Syriac Summer School

VHMML has added a range of resources to its website, including a school for learning to read Syriac manuscripts. Byzantine News shared news about the summer school HMML and Dumbarton Oaks will be holding this summer. Tony Burke blogged about the critical edition of the Syriac Infancy Gospel of Thomas that he has been working on. Of [Read More...]

Paul Must Have Been Angry

  The idea for this joke came about in my Sunday school class yesterday. We have been studying 1 Corinthians, and found ourselves talking about what made Paul’s letters persuasive before they were scripture. For those who may not get the joke, our oldest manuscripts of the New Testament are written in all upper-case letters, not because [Read More...]

Counting Manuscripts and Which Manuscripts Count

Peter Gurry shared the above image graphing the number of manuscripts we have from each century. Keep in mind that centuries are a convenient timekeeping device, and it is not as though a manuscript copied new year’s eve on the last day of the second century is more valuable than one copied the following day. In fact, [Read More...]

Identification of Authors in Ancient Literature

A discussion here on this blog brought up the question of whether other ancient works may, like the Gospels, have initially circulated without an author being indicated, with the attribution to the author being added only subsequently to the manuscript tradition. This led to a blog post by Matthew Ferguson, which made comparisons to the works of [Read More...]

Papyri Online

What’s New in Papyrology shared two links yesterday. One was to the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts, which has images of many important papyrus fragments of the New Testament available online.  The other has transcriptions of a number of manuscripts of the Gospel of John. [Read more...]

Syriac Manuscripts from the Vatican Library Online

The Center for the Preservation of Ancient Religious Texts at Brigham Young University announced that a large number of additional Syriac manuscripts in the Vatican Library are now available in digital form online. Click through for a list of the manuscripts with details about what each one is. [Read more...]

Scribes with Knives

The British Library blog has a number of images of medieval scribes at work, with some commentary explaining the tools they used and other aspects of what is depicted. While the development of the writing desk does seem to represent a difference between them and their more ancient predecessors, there are still aspects of their [Read More...]

Bart Ehrman on the Gospel of Judas

Bart Ehrman gave the lecture above at a very strange place. In the YouTube sidebar, it recommended another lecture Ehrman gave at the Getty Museum:   [Read more...]

The Biblical-Monastic @ Sign

Via IO9 I learned that Wired has an interesting piece about the probable monastic scribal origin of the @ sign, as a way of indicating “at” (whether in English or another language). It seems th@ monks beg@ this bit of shorthand – in the Biblical sense.   [Read more...]

The Book of Kells Online

The Library of Trinity College Dublin has made the entire Book of Kells available online! If you like that, you’ll probably like this Anglo-Saxon Psalter in the French National Library too!     [Read more...]

Comparison and Collation of Mandaean Texts

The second paper this morning was by Tania Notarius, and is on the relationship between a variety of overlapping and partially-overlapping manuscripts we have, each of which is a compilation of smaller collections of individual magical incantations, together with explanations for how to use them. Often these sorts of things were copied by scribes who [Read More...]