James Charlesworth on Jesus’ Tomb(s)

Eerdmans shared the above interview with James Charlesworth, talking about the excavations in Talpiot and the tombs found there, in connection with his forthcoming edited volume, The Tomb of Jesus and His Family?: Exploring Ancient Jewish Tombs Near Jerusalem’s Walls. For my own thoughts on the subject, see The Burial of Jesus: What Does History [Read More...]

Talpiotpalooza

There have been a number of articles and blog posts in recent days related to the burial of Jesus in general, and the claim that a tomb in the Talpiot neighborhood of Jerusalem is the place where Jesus was buried. Here are the relevant links to three recent articles in The Bible and Interpretation: James Tabor wrote [Read More...]

The Historical Jesus around the Blogosphere

There’s a lot of interesting stuff in the blogosphere in the past day or so related to topics of regular interest on this blog. Bart Ehrman offered a lengthy reply to Richard Carrier. Ehrman also did an interview at Religion Dispatches about his latest book, Did Jesus Exist? Thom Stark deals with Richard Carrier’s attempt [Read More...]

From the Talpiot Tomb to the Blogosphere

In my class on the historical Jesus yesterday we discussed the burial of Jesus, including some discussion of the Talpiot tomb. Here’s what’s been appearing in the blogosphere since my last round-up on the topic: Mark Goodacre shows problems with the claim that Jonah’s name appears on an ossuary in the Talpiot patio tomb. He [Read More...]

Talpiot Tomb/Good Friday-Easter/Passover Round-Up

Since the book and documentary promoting the view that Talpiot Tomb B is connected with the earliest Christians was timed to coincide with the Easter season, it is unsurprising that the attention to it is growing. And it seems appropriate to blog about the Talpiot tombs on a day which is all about Jesus’s body [Read More...]

Into and Out of Tombs Round-Up

Blogging about the Talpiot tombs and the historical Jesus blends into other topics that come up in particular during the week before Easter. And so a range of those intersecting subjects appear in posts to which I link below. Mark Goodacre highlights some successes in getting corrections made to information on the Jesus Discovery web [Read More...]

Talpiot Tomb, Jesus Mythicism, and Related Round-Up

Mark Goodacre had a busier blogging day than we’ve seen from him in a long time, discussing both the evidence that ossuaries in Talpiot tomb B (the “patio tomb”) had been moved around, and seeming discrepancies between information from James Tabor and Simcha Jacobovici on the one hand, and James Charlesworth on the other. Bob [Read More...]

Contrasting Views on the Authenticity of the James Ossuary (and related subjects)

Michael Heiser indicates that his mind is changing about the matter of the authenticity of the James ossuary, because of a photo of the ossuary, with its full inscription, dated prior to the discovery of the Talpiot tombs. The photo has apparently been authenticated by someone from the FBI. If this is correct, it seems [Read More...]

Talpiot Photos and a Video that may Change your Perspective

A round up of the latest blogging on the Talpiot tombs and James ossuary. James Tabor has provided more photos of the most discussed inscription from Talpiot tomb B. He also offers additional photos of other inscriptions from the tomb, also known as the patio tomb. Tom Verenna offers video evidence from the “Lost Tomb of [Read More...]

The Talpiot Tomb Jumps the Tropical Fish

Here’s the latest round-up on the Talpiot tomb discussion in the blogosphere. The title of this post comes from a post by Bob Cargill which responds to the suggestion that the “fish” on one of the Talpiot ossuaries is inspired by a tropical fish. It includes this image which treats the logic of that claim [Read More...]

Round-Up: Talpiot Tomb and James Ossuary Latest

Here’s my round-up combining the latest from the blogosphere on two key archaeological topics that are featuring prominently in news and blogs: the Talpiot tombs and their ossuaries, and the conclusion of the James ossuary forgery trial. James Tabor makes an attempt at satire, but I don’t think it works very well. He also draws [Read More...]


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