100 Years of Teaching

KDRV News shared the above list of rules for teachers from a hundred years ago, in conjunction with the celebration of the centennary of Ruch School, from which the list comes (HT Shelley Ross). It is interesting to reflect on – the gender assumption about who would teach, the need to get there early to [Read More...]

You Have Heard Them Called Antitheses, But I Say To You…

Doug Chaplin has posted about the extraordinary antitheses in Matthew’s Gospel. I disagree with his way of understanding them, and so thought I would write a post in response. I regularly tell my students that it is unlikely that these sayings should be understood as meaning “You heard God say in the past, but I [Read More...]

James Kugel Lecture on Biblical Interpretation

HT Scott Bailey [Read more...]

Popping Shrimp and Online Teaching

There’s a wonderful op-ed piece by Aaron Hirsh in today’s New York Times, on online teaching and what it stands to gain and lose. His proposal, that wise use of online components can free up more time for experiential learning, resonates with my own thoughts on this subject.   [Read more...]

Reciprocal Discomfort

On Wednesday, Butler University hosted its start of year faculty workshop. I presented on my experience of teaching online in the breakout sessions. In the first plenary session, we were compelled to write about, and then share with others sitting at our table, one thing that we find challenging or that makes us insecure. I [Read More...]

Using Jesus

David Hayward wrote the following on his blog today: Everyone with any sense knows that we accept the acceptable words of Jesus and appropriate his unacceptable words in altered forms. That is, we use his sayings if they are agreeable, and we reject or theologically undermine the ones that aren’t. I think an interesting question [Read More...]

Christ’s Elementary Word

Yesterday in my Sunday school class we discussed Hebrews 5:11-6:3. After a bit of discussion of the penchant in some Christian circles (although by no means all) to be content with an immature understanding of and approach to their faith, and a declining focus on education in some churches and denominations, we turned our attention [Read More...]

Teaching Religion Online

The “Spotlight on Teaching” section of the latest issue of Religious Studies News is focused on online education. It includes interesting articles such as: Sandie Gravett, “Rethinking Online Education” Erica Andrus, “Introducing Religion to Cyberstudents” John Strong, “Hybrid or Blended Teaching Formats” John Baumann, “The Challenge of Online Education” Annie Blazer and Brandi Denison, “The Internet [Read More...]

Ken Ham, Moses, and Jesus

Ken Ham has posted a reaction on Facebook to an image I shared on my blog yesterday (you can read the comments from his cronies there). I’ll share the text of his Facebook post here and then discuss it: Come on James McGrath, do you really think stooping to such lows befits a professor at [Read More...]

Scholarship in the Blogosphere

There are several interesting topics that I think I can bring together under this heading. First, Mark Goodacre has blogged about the strange experience of having a peer-reviewed journal article be written which interacts with a post on his blog! And so he raises the question of whether this is flattering or worrying, since often [Read More...]

The Jesus SeM&Minar as Teaching Tool

I’ve mentioned here before the class activity  I use when teaching my course on the historical Jesus. I get students to bring M&Ms, and we re-enact the voting on sayings of Jesus undertaken by the Jesus Seminar. And we call ourselves the Jesus SeM&Minar. Keith Reich recently tried the activity in his class. Click through [Read More...]


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