5 Ways to Stop Envy Before It Starts

It’s been called the green monster. Invidia in the Latin texts. A deadly sin. And a common one.

Photo via http://pastorerickson.com/?p=2211

Envy. It’s what’s for dinner — or at least it’s what’s often in our hearts by the time we get to that point of the day. By then, we’ve usually encountered someone having some success. More than we’re having, at least.

And that’s all it takes.

I confess to wrestling with this one. I think most writers — any creative souls really — know the struggle within when another is praised. When another succeeds. When someone else arrives there ahead of us.

It might be subscribers, followers, book sales, publicity, adulation of any kind that triggers our envious demons. Most of us, however, especially as people of faith, know that open envy would blatantly violate God’s commands — and other’s high opinion of us. So we choose a different, more sophisticated route that lets our green monster nibble around the edges of another’s success:

  • “Well sure, he has that high-visibility position. If I had that….”
  • “What do you expect when she has that publisher? How could she not….”
  • “But he doesn’t have children or a family, so he has time. Who wouldn’t if….”

What are we doing if not creatively dumbing down the standards for success to what we think is our level? Mind you, the excuses we tell ourselves often are not true. But that seldom matters at the time. Neither does our ignoring our own blessings as a result. As Shakespeare penned in Sonnet 29:

Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,

Featured like him, like him with friends possess’d,

Desiring this man’s art, and that man’s scope,

With what I most enjoy contented least.

Here are 5 ways to stop envy before it starts:

  1. Call it what it is. Sin. When you catch yourself excusing another’s success, point it out to yourself. Then confess it. After all, we can’t avoid what we can’t identify. We’ll be knee-deep in the muck of envy before we realize it. By then we’ll need the rest of the day just to get out.
  2. Be generous. Train yourself to intentionally help others, especially those who can’t seem to help you in return. If we simply stop being envious, we are but envious trolls who aren’t being envious — at that moment. But if we intentionally move in the opposite direction, we’re becoming something quite different. Something new.
  3. Find someone else to celebrate every day. It’s good for them. It’s good for you. Commit each day to shine a spotlight on somebody. I try to use Twitter as one way to highlight a new someone every day. It’s like eating your spinach but with eternal health benefits.
  4. Remember you are in charge of you. When we try pulling others down to our level, we’re simply pointing out that we are the ones unhappy with ourselves. So whose fault is that, really? Do something about it. Embracing a victim mentality only makes it easier to justify envy the next time around when we’re still stuck in the same spot.
  5. Perform for an audience of One. No, I don’t mean you. Os Guinness noted well in his book The Call that only one opinion really matters. Scriptures remind us that comparing ourselves among ourselves, we are not wise. The moment we start the slide toward invidia, we enter an ominous downward spiral of lies: “Because they succeeded, I quit. Because I’m not them, I refuse to be me.” Of course, you never could become them and you cannot but be you.

No wonder we’re frustrated.

Do you find it challenging to stop envy before it starts? When do you find yourself quick to belittle another’s success? Thanks for leaving a comment here to let the rest of us know we’re not the only ones with this problem.

About Bill Blankschaen

Bill Blankschaen is a writer, speaker, author, content and messaging consultant, and general Kingdom catalyst. As the founder of FaithWalkers, he equips Christians to think, live, and lead with abundant faith.

His writing has been featured with Michael Hyatt, Ron Edmondson, Skip Prichard, Jeff Goins, Blueprint for Life, Catalyst Leaders, Faith Village, and many others.

Bill is a blessed husband and the father of six children. He serves as VP of Content & Operations for Polymath Innovations in partnership with Patheos Labs. He is the Junior Scholar of Cultural Theology and Director of Development for the Center for Cultural Leadership. He works with Equip Leadership, Inc. (founded by John C. Maxwell) and ministry leaders around the Pacific Rim to better equip ministry leaders there to lead with passion and greater influence.

  • Trudy1971

    Thank you for these words which I really need to hear. I’ve always been insecure and never felt I was good enough because of my mother telling me so. Just when life started to be comfortable and I felt good about myself, a new family moved into the neighbourhood. The wife was very flashy and loved to talk about how much everything costs and how she demanded only the best. I know this is an insecurity on her part. But it stayed with me and I can’t shake it. If I take a nice vacation to Florida, she takes one as well but adds on a cruise. If I buy a new car, hers is bigger and cost twice as much. My business is doing well, hers is doing 10 times better. I find myself hating her and envying her. This is not a great way to live and it’s pulling me down into darkness. The odd part is my other neighbour is rich beyond anything I can imagine. But she lives in a house like mine, drives a car like me and we talk so easily. I’m never envious of her. When I look at my close family and friends, they would consider me someone to envy! So why can’t I feel secure?


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