Bridge to Terabithia and mortality


My interview with Katherine Paterson, author of Bridge to Terabithia, was cited again yesterday — this time in an excellent article by Emily Bazelon at Slate.com on how both the book and the film treat mortality, denial, anger, and related themes.

And while I like the film overall, I do agree that it “nearly wrecks” the final scene “by bursting into Disney fantasy” — a point that I considered making myself, in my review, but you never know just how closely you should flirt with giving away major spoilers.

Anyway, the book’s ending was perfect, powerful, unexpected, and raised so many questions. The movie’s ending … doesn’t.

And I thought the rickety wooden bridge was much, much more evocative and alluring than the CGI thing that replaces it.

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  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11819923803855144915 russell lucas

    Agreed. That final shot in the make-believe kingdom was just the fulcrum to use all the shots they show in the misleading trailer so that people who came for the trolls, et cetera can’t claim they were ripped off.

    This joins the recent run of “fantasy” films where the real-life world is infinitely more interesting than the fantasy one.