Box office: Three new wide releases flop in North America, but Bridget Jones’s Baby is a hit overseas

Box office: Three new wide releases flop in North America, but Bridget Jones’s Baby is a hit overseas September 18, 2016

bridgetjonessbaby-a

Three new movies — including a couple of long-delayed threequels — got off to a poor start in North America this week, but one of them was a hit overseas, at least.

Bridget Jones’s Baby landed in third place at the North American box office with an estimated $8.2 million between Thursday and Sunday nights.

That’s the lowest domestic opening of any film in the Bridget Jones series, even before inflation is taken into account. (The first two films came out in 2001 and 2004.)

However, the new film broke records overseas, where it racked up $29.9 million and had the best opening of any romantic comedy released in the British Isles.

Meanwhile, Blair Witch landed in second place for the weekend with $9.7 million, which is easily the lowest wide debut of any film in that once-hyped series. (The original Blair Witch Project grossed $29.2 million in its first wide weekend in 1999, and Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 opened to $13.2 million in 2000.)

The film’s poor performance is all the more remarkable because low-budget horror films like Don’t Breathe, Lights Out and The Purge: Election Year have done very well this year, and so have bigger-budgeted horror films like The Conjuring 2.

The weekend’s other major wide release was Snowden, which stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt as the former NSA agent who revealed just how extensively the U.S. government was spying on its own citizens. The film grossed a mere $8 million, which marks the lowest opening of any Oliver Stone film in wide release since 1997’s U-Turn.

Hillsong: Let Hope Rise, a “faith-based” documentary about a praise and worship band, also opened on 816 screens across the U.S. (It doesn’t come to Canada until early October.) It grossed $1.3 million and ranked 13th for the week.

Finally, Ben-Hur earned only $225,000 and landed in 28th place in its fifth week. It has grossed $26.03 million in North America and another $54.9 million overseas, where it has almost finished rolling out, for a worldwide total of $80.9 million. (The film will open in Italy later this month, and it will come to Japan in January.)

Meanwhile, in other box-office news…

Sully led the box office with $22 million in its second week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $70.5 million. The film has earned another $23.4 million overseas for a global total of $93.9 million.

Don’t Breathe earned $5.6 million and ranked fifth in its fourth week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $75.3 million. The film has earned another $31.7 million overseas for a global total of $107 million.

When the Bough Breaks earned $5.5 million and ranked sixth in its second week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $22.7 million. The film does not seem to have been released overseas yet.

Suicide Squad earned $4.7 million and ranked seventh in its seventh week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $313.8 million. The film has earned another $405.1 million overseas for a global total of $718.9 million.

The Wild Life earned $2.7 million and ranked eighth in its second week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $6.7 million. The film has earned another $20.9 million overseas for a global total of $27.5 million.

Kubo and the Two Strings earned $2.5 million and ranked ninth in its fifth week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $44.2 million. The film has earned another $10.4 million overseas for a global total of $54.6 million.

And Pete’s Dragon earned $2 million and ranked tenth in its sixth week, thereby raising its domestic cume to $72.8 million. The film has earned another $40.2 million overseas for a global total of $113 million.

Now for a bit of extra data on Ben-Hur’s place among “faith-based” and Bible films:

Ben-Hur now ranks 11th among recent Bible-themed films in North America:

  • 2004 — The Passion of the Christ — $370.8 million
  • 1998 — The Prince of Egypt — $101.4 million
  • 2014 — Noah — $101.2 million
  • 2014 — Exodus: Gods and Kings — $65 million
  • 2014 — Son of God — $59.7 million
  • 2009 — Year One — $43.3 million
  • 2006 — The Nativity Story — $37.6 million
  • 2016 — Risen — $36.9 million
  • 1981 — History of the World, Part I — $31.7 million
  • 2016 — Hail, Caesar! — $30.1 million
  • 2016 — Ben-Hur — $26.0 million
  • 2002 — Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie — $25.6 million
  • 1979 — Monty Python’s Life of Brian — $20 million
  • 1980 — Wholly Moses! — $14.2 million
  • 2006 — One Night with the King — $13.4 million
  • 1988 — The Last Temptation of Christ — $8.4 million
  • 2016 — The Young Messiah — $6.5 million
  • 1985 — King David — $5.1 million
  • 2003 — The Gospel of John — $4.1 million

It also still ranks fifth among Bible-themed films of the past 20 years overseas (Box Office Mojo doesn’t have foreign figures for older Bible-themed films):

  • 2014 — Noah — $261.4 million
  • 2004 — The Passion of the Christ — $241.1 million
  • 2014 — Exodus: Gods and Kings — $203.2 million
  • 1998 — The Prince of Egypt — $117.2 million
  • 2016 — Ben-Hur — $54.9 million
  • 2016 — Hail, Caesar! — $33.1 million
  • 2009 — Year One — $19.0 million
  • 2014 — Son of God — $11.1 million
  • 2016 — Risen — $9.2 million
  • 2006 — The Nativity Story — $8.8 million

And it now ranks fifth among Bible-themed films of the past 20 years worldwide:

  • 2004 — The Passion of the Christ — $370.8 + 241.1 = 611.9 million
  • 2014 — Noah — $101.2 + 261.4 = 362.6 million
  • 2014 — Exodus: Gods and Kings — $65.0 + 203.2 = 268.2 million
  • 1998 — The Prince of Egypt — $101.4 + 117.2 = 218.6 million
  • 2016 — Ben-Hur — $26.0 + 54.9 = 80.9 million
  • 2014 — Son of God — $59.7 + 11.1 = 70.8 million
  • 2016 — Hail, Caesar! — $30.1 + 33.1 = 63.2 million
  • 2009 — Year One — $43.3 + 19.0 = 62.4 million
  • 2006 — The Nativity Story — $37.6 + 8.8 = 46.4 million
  • 2016 — Risen — $36.9 + 9.2 = 46.1 million

Ben-Hur also now ranks 13th among “faith-based” films in North America:

  • 2004 — The Passion of the Christ — $370.8 million
  • 2014 — Heaven Is for Real — $91.4 million
  • 2015 — War Room — $67.8 million
  • 2016 — Miracles from Heaven — $61.7 million
  • 2014 — God’s Not Dead — $60.8 million
  • 2014 — Son of God — $59.7 million
  • 2011 — Soul Surfer — $43.9 million
  • 2006 — The Nativity Story — $37.6 million
  • 2016 — Risen — $36.9 million
  • 2011 — Courageous — $34.5 million
  • 2008 — Fireproof — $33.5 million
  • 2014 — When the Game Stands Tall — $30.1 million
  • 2016 — Ben-Hur — $26.0 million
  • 2002 — Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie — $25.6 million
  • 2016 — God’s Not Dead 2 — $20.8 million
  • 2005 — The Gospel — $15.8 million

And now for a bit of extra data on the year’s top-grossing animated films:

In North America, The Secret Life of Pets still ranks eighth among animated films:

  • 2016 — Finding Dory (Pixar) — $483.9 million
  • 2004 — Shrek 2 (DreamWorks) — $441.2 million
  • 1994 — The Lion King (Disney) — $422.8 million
  • 2010 — Toy Story 3 (Pixar) — $415.0 million
  • 2013 — Frozen (Disney) — $400.7 million
  • 2003 — Finding Nemo (Pixar) — $380.8 million
  • 2013 — Despicable Me 2 (Universal) — $368.1 million
  • 2016 — The Secret Life of Pets (Universal) — $363.4 million
  • 2015 — Inside Out (Pixar) — $356.5 million
  • 2016 — Zootopia (Disney) — $341.3 million

Overseas, Finding Dory now ranks 15th, The Secret Life of Pets now ranks 21st, and Ice Age: Collision Course still ranks 36th:

  • 2013 — Frozen (Disney) — $875.7 million
  • 2015 — Minions (Universal) — $823.4 million
  • 2012 — Ice Age: Continental Drift (Fox) — $715.9 million
  • 2009 — Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (Fox) — $690.1 million
  • 2016 — Zootopia (Disney) — $682.2 million
  • 2010 — Toy Story 3 (Pixar) — $648.2 million
  • 2013 — Despicable Me 2 (Universal) — $602.7 million
  • 2003 — Finding Nemo (Pixar) — $559.5 million
  • 1994 — The Lion King (Disney) — $545.7 million
  • 2012 — Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (DreamWorks) — $530.5 million
  • 2010 — Shrek Forever After (DreamWorks) — $513.9 million
  • 2015 — Inside Out (Pixar) — $501.1 million
  • 2011 — Kung Fu Panda 2 (DreamWorks) — $500.4 million
  • 2004 — Shrek 2 (DreamWorks) — $478.6 million
  • 2016 — Finding Dory (Pixar) — $477.1 million
  • 2007 — Shrek the Third (DreamWorks) — $476.2 million
  • 2013 — Monsters University (Pixar) — $475.7 million
  • 2006 — Ice Age: The Meltdown (Fox) — $465.6 million
  • 2014 — How to Train Your Dragon 2 (DreamWorks) — $444.5 million
  • 2009 — Up (Pixar) — $442.1 million
  • 2016 — The Secret Life of Pets (Universal) — $441.6 million
  • 2014 — Big Hero 6 (Disney) — $435.3 million
  • 2008 — Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (DreamWorks) — $423.9 million
  • 2008 — Kung Fu Panda (DreamWorks) — $416.3 million
  • 2007 — Ratatouille (Pixar) — $414.3 million
  • 2011 — Puss in Boots (DreamWorks) — $405.7 million
  • 2013 — The Croods (DreamWorks) — $400.0 million
  • 2010 — Tangled (Disney) — $391.0 million
  • 2016 — Kung Fu Panda 3 (DreamWorks) — $376.4 million
  • 2004 — The Incredibles (Pixar) — $371.6 million
  • 2011 — Cars 2 (Pixar) — $370.7 million
  • 2014 — Rio 2 (Fox) — $368.6 million
  • 2007 — The Simpsons Movie (Fox) — $343.9 million
  • 2011 — Rio (Fox) — $341.0 million
  • 2005 — Madagascar (DreamWorks) — $339.1 million
  • 2016 — Ice Age: Collision Course — $333.7 million
  • 2008 — WALL-E (Pixar) — $309.5 million
  • 2015 — Hotel Transylvania 2 — $303.5 million
  • 2012 — Brave (Pixar) — $303.2 million
  • 2011 — The Adventures of Tintin — $296.4 million

And worldwide, Finding Dory still ranks seventh, while The Secret Life of Pets now ranks 13th:

  • 2013 — Frozen (Disney) — $400.7 + 875.7 = 1276.5 million
  • 2015 — Minions (Universal) — $336.0 + 823.4 = 1159.4 million
  • 2010 — Toy Story 3 (Pixar) — $415.0 + 648.2 = 1063.2 million
  • 2016 — Zootopia (Disney) — $341.3 + 682.2 = 1023.4 million
  • 2013 — Despicable Me 2 (Universal) — $368.1 + 602.7 = 970.8 million
  • 1994 — The Lion King (Disney) — $422.8 + 545.7 = 968.5 million
  • 2016 — Finding Dory (Pixar) — $483.9 + 477.1 = 961.1 million
  • 2003 — Finding Nemo (Pixar) — $380.8 + 559.5 = 940.3 million
  • 2004 — Shrek 2 (DreamWorks) — $441.2 + 478.6 = 919.8 million
  • 2009 — Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (Fox) — $196.6 + 690.1 = 886.7 million
  • 2012 — Ice Age: Continental Drift (Fox) — $161.3 + 715.9 = 877.2 million
  • 2015 — Inside Out (Pixar) — $356.5 + 501.1 = 857.6 million
  • 2016 — The Secret Life of Pets (Universal) — $363.4 + 441.6 = 804.9 million
  • 2007 — Shrek the Third (DreamWorks) — $322.7 + 476.2 = 799.0 million
  • 2010 — Shrek Forever After (DreamWorks) — $238.7 + 513.9 = 752.6 million
  • 2012 — Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (DreamWorks) — $216.4 + 530.5 = 746.9 million
  • 2013 — Monsters University (Pixar) — $268.5 + 475.7 = 744.2 million
  • 2009 — Up (Pixar) — $293.0 + 442.1 = 735.1 million
  • 2011 — Kung Fu Panda 2 (DreamWorks) — $165.2 + 500.4 = 665.7 million
  • 2006 — Ice Age: The Meltdown (Fox) — $195.3 + 465.6 = 660.9 million

Next week brings us Storks and the remake of The Magnificent Seven.

"We are so happy we have reached you through here and you came to know ..."

Watch: The Savior, possibly the first ..."
"I had not known about this movie except for here. Thanks for posting the English ..."

Watch: The Savior, possibly the first ..."
"The science in Dark City was just plain flaky.As opposed to the oh-so-realistic "human metabolism ..."

Dark City and the ambiguous ending.
"So now Joaquin Phoenix can say,"Hello... I'm Jesus Christ."Seriously if he plays Jesus, he better ..."

Mary Magdalene director Garth Davis says ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Entertainment
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment