Forest Whitaker in talks to direct, star in The Shack

Yesterday brought us the first clip from the Left Behind reboot and the news that the Academy had rescinded the Oscar nomination for Alone Yet Not Alone. Today brings news of a not-so-conservative Christian-themed movie.

Deadline reports that Forest Whitaker, most recently seen in Black Nativity, is in talks to direct and star in a film adaptation of The Shack, the William P. Young book about a man who loses his daughter to a serial killer and then spends a weekend discussing the problem of evil with God himself (or rather, perhaps, with God themselves, since God appears as a man and two women).

The film is being produced by Gil Netter, whose credits include Flicka (2006), The Blind Side (2009) and Life of Pi (2012); and it is written by John Fusco, whose credits include Youngs Guns (1988-1990), Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (2002) and Hidalgo (2004). (So… will there be horses in this movie?)

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Black Nativity back on track with Forest Whitaker

The on-again, off-again film adaptation of Black Nativity seems to be on again, now.

Two months ago, it was reported that the film, which is based on a 1961 musical and concerns a young black teen who spends Christmas with his grandparents, had been shelved because Samuel L. Jackson dropped out of the project.

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Review: The Last King of Scotland (dir. Kevin Macdonald, 2006)

Don’t let the title fool you. The Last King of Scotland takes place not in the Highlands but in Uganda, and the title refers not to some European monarch but to one of the most notorious African dictators, Idi Amin. So why do this film — and the Giles Foden novel on which it is based—bear this title? Partly because “King of Scotland” was one of the many titles Amin gave himself during his brutal eight-year reign; another was “Conqueror of the British Empire.” Amin, who rose through the ranks of the British colonial army under the patronage of Scottish officers before Uganda became independent, was a fan of all things Scottish, and sometimes wore kilts in public.

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