Billy Graham’s Top Five / A handful of World Wide Pictures films worth watching.

The Hiding Place (1975)
One of the best and most ambitious Christian films ever made, this moving, realistic, and superbly-acted historical epic — based on Corrie Ten Boom’s account of how she was sent to a concentration camp with her sister for hiding Jews from the Nazis — doesn’t flinch from some of the more graphic and disturbing aspects of the Holocaust. Yes, Minister’s Nigel Hawthorne has a bit part as a cowardly pastor.

Joni (1979)
Based on Joni Eareckson’s popular account of how she found a deeper faith after a diving accident left her a quadriplegic, and filled with subtle visuals and silences, this just may be the most “cinematic” of World Wide’s films. Eareckson, playing herself, proves she is a more than capable actress as she recreates some of the most traumatic experiences in her life. Ghostbusters’ Ernie Hudson plays one of the hospital orderlies.

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Billy Graham Goes to the Movies

For more than 50 years, the evangelist’s organization has been making films for the purpose of bringing viewers to Christ. And it’s worked—more than 2 million times.

Forty years after the fact, Denny Wayman can still remember one of his first experiences with evangelism — and it took place in a movie theatre in downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Wayman was still in junior high school when World Wide Pictures, the movie studio founded by evangelist Billy Graham, produced The Restless Ones (1965), a film about juvenile delinquents, teen pregnancy, and other social issues. The film ends with Graham issuing an altar call at one of his crusades, and just as the characters in the movie are encouraged to come forward, so too the audience in the movie theatre was invited to take a stand for Christ. And Wayman was one of the counselors who stood, waiting, at the front.

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