Why President Obama’s Transgender Proclamation Is Far Broader and More Dangerous than You Think

The Department of Justice announced a radical new policy regarding transgendered students access to the bathroom of their choice in public schools.  The gist?  Bow down to the Obama Administration’s radical views on transgendered children and allow them access to whatever bathroom they want, or loose all of your federal funding.

And while this is shocking and outrageous, the implications of the DOJ policy are more far-reaching and dangerous than we could have ever imagined.

My husband, David French, explains:

First, the very act of teaching biology and human physiology will be hate speech unless it’s modified to conform to the new transgender “facts.” Teachers will have to take great pains to note that chromosomes, reproductive organs, hormonal systems, and any other physical marker of sex is irrelevant to this thing called “gender,” which, “factually,” is a mere state of mind.

Second, any statements of dissent — from teachers or students — will be treated as both “anti-science” and “discriminatory,” contributing to a “hostile environment” that schools are legally bound to prohibit. This prohibition will go well beyond the use of pronouns and into discussions of what it means to be male and female. The argument that a “girl” with a penis remains a boy will be treated exactly the same as an argument that blacks are inferior to whites or Arabs inferior to Jews.

Third, public schools will now be even further opposed, doctrinally and legally, to orthodox Christianity. Christian parents who send their children to public schools need to be aware of the new “facts.” They will be taught not only that their churches are factually wrong in their assessments of sex and gender but that they are actually bigoted and hateful — comparable to white supremacists.

Fourth, the administration’s actions set a key political precedent. Federal funding — long seen as a boon to local schools — is now clearly and unmistakably an instrument of national control. The federal education bureaucracy is stocked with energetic and creative progressives, and last week’s letter represents just one more step in an ongoing effort to turn money into mandates.

Finally, because the administration’s edict is tied to funding, not even civil disobedience can block its enforcement. In other words, state officials can “defy” the edict all they want, but unless a court rules in their favor, the administration need merely stop a bank transfer to enforce its “guidance.” This would place citizens of dissenting states in the unenviable position of either complying — and sacrificing their kids’ liberty and safety — or defying and seeing cash-strapped schools lose millions of dollars in public support, all while they continue to pay taxes to fund progressive jurisdictions.

To read the rest of David’s article, visit his column at National Review.

As concerned parents and citizens it is imperative that we understand the full weight of the DOJ’s mandate and what it means for our children and the future of education in our country.

I’ve said it before, and I will say it again.  We will be made to care.

Parents’ phone use hurts kids: Babies with “distracted” parents might not develop correctly

I knew I needed to play with my eight year old, but I also was having an important text conversation with a coworker on a subject that needed to be ironed out. [Read more…]

Why Are Police Officers In Public Schools? Because of Lousy Parents

If you watched the news last week, undoubtedly you heard about the policeman suspended for forcibly removing a young black girl from her seat after she refused to listen to her teacher’s request to leave the classroom.  Oh, and she hit the policeman in his face.

Not surprisingly, this incident has led the Left to scream about the problem with police officers in public school.  At National Review, David French takes this argument head on by flipping the narrative, explaining why police officers were put in public schools in the first place.

David begins by stating the obvious:

Let’s begin with a point of agreement: Ideally, no one wants cops in schools.

A law-enforcement presence, by its very nature, introduces criminal law and criminal penalties into the kinds of altercations and disruptions that used to be dealt with entirely through in-house school and parental disciplinary processes. I still vividly remember the day when my father grabbed me by the arm — after receiving a note from my teacher that I’d been involved in a fight with the same kid on consecutive days — marched me over to the kid’s house, and then hashed it all out with his father, man-to-man. The dads agreed the fighting had to stop, pledged to punish us more severely than the school ever would, and — suddenly — peace reigned on the playground.

So how did we go from the days where parents sorted out these types of conflicts to today where policemen are forced to do so?  David writes:

But in all too many public schools, parental involvement simply isn’t an option. As one inner-city public school teacher told me, in her first four years of teaching elementary school, she could count the number of intact, mother–father households on the fingers of one hand — and those parents weren’t even married. Very few parents bother to show up for parent/teacher conferences, and the interactions are often dominated by angry threats to sue for various perceived slights. Lousy parenting leads to horrific, often violent child behavior — and even seasoned teachers can be shocked and frightened when classroom incidents spiral out of control.

[…]

Just as I can vividly remember what it’s like to have parents fix school-discipline problems, I can also remember the moment in my high school when the police took control. A fight broke out during my senior year, a brawl so violent that teachers — even football coaches — were knocked to the ground and thrown against lockers. Students scrambling to get out of the way slipped on the bloody floors, and chaos reigned until first the sheriff and then the state police arrived in force. For the next week, we walked the halls with police officers in every corridor, and we were grateful for their presence.

Read David’s full article to learn what he thinks it will take to get police out of schools.

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Candace Cameron Bure: Why Chasing Your Dreams is Good for Your Kids

 

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An exclusive guest post by Candace Cameron Bure

I began devoting my Monday and Tuesday nights to watching Dancing with the Stars the very first season it aired. I loved the show—how it followed the contestants’ journeys in a positive light, and was a refreshing breath of fresh air for reality television.

I said to my husband that if I were asked to participate on the show, I would definitely consider it. He probably thought I was a bit crazy, but my ever-supportive Val replied with, “Do what makes you happy.”  [Read more…]

What Happened at the Mall Today with my Black Child – A White Mother’s Fear

At the mall at the Apple store, when Naomi found a "photo booth" function on a new desktop.

At the mall at the Apple store, when Naomi found a “photo booth” function on a new desktop.

Once, we were in the airport in DC, trying desperately to catch a flight for which we were running behind. As we were collecting our belongings from security, we handed Naomi – our daughter from Ethiopia – to Austin and instructed him to hold her off to the side. [Read more…]