What I Learned Over My Harry Potter Weekend (No Spoilers!)

It took me an entire Sunday, but I finished the book. Good stuff.

Here’s what I learned from the book and from a Harry Potter release party:

  • When I sold my soul, I should have done it in 7 separate parts.
  • Even one of the largest Potter Parties in the country can be ruined by Christian fundies on the street screaming to everyone that they’re going to hell. Here’s one guy… though there were several more in his vicinity:

  • Other Christian fundies might be embarrassed by those in their group. Some that I saw remained silent, passed out pamphlets, and stood at a distance from their louder church colleagues. It’s like they wanted nothing to do with them.
  • If you start telling the fundies that “Allah is God,” simply out of spite, like one guy did, the cops get mad.
  • Apparently, there are light sabers in Harry Potter:

    LightSabers
  • Barnes & Noble enjoys taunting the children before midnight:

    Taunting
  • Starbucks now has exciting new drinks! And you need to magically create extra money if you want any hope of paying for them…
  • Bathrooms are so much cooler when they’re Potterfied:

    PotterPotty
  • For all the talk of the book having a Christian undertone, I enjoyed this conversation between two characters (p. 411):

    “Well, how can that be real?”

    “Prove that it is not,” said [Character 1].

    [Character 2] looked outraged.

    “But that’s — I’m sorry, but that’s completely ridiculous! How can I possibly prove it doesn’t exist?… I mean, you could claim that anything’s real if the only basis for believing in it is that nobody’s proved it doesn’t exist!”

    “Yes, you could,” said [Character 1]. “I am glad to see that you are opening your mind a little.”



[tags]atheist, atheism, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Christian, fundamentalist, witchcraft, Allah, Muslim, light saber, Barnes & Noble, Starbucks[/tags]

  • http://www.skepchick.org writerdd

    I noticed a few Bible quotes and allusions in this HP book. Amusing. Also, several characters said “Thank God” when a loved-one escaped death. (Althought no-one said it was God’s will when a loved-one did get killed.) I don’t recall anything like this in the previous books.

    I also found the comment “Of course this is happening inside your head. Why should that mean it’s not real?” to be interesting. I won’t say any more about that, because it would be a huge spoiler! I wonder if JKR was giving a measured response to criticism by fundies, and balancing it with some healthy skepticism.

    Loved the book and the way it all worked out, but I still find myself wondering if JKR got a new editor after book 4 or if the publisher stopped trying to edit her because they knew the book would make a ton of money even unedited, because the last 3 books are much flabbier and less tightly structured than the first few (which is not to say that I didn’t love them, and I do realize that the topics became more mature and the story darker as the series went on!)….

    Well, I bet she’s glad to be able to move onto something else now. What a huge accomplishment, to finish a seven-book series!

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    *****PRETTY MUCH SPOLER FREE COMMENT*****

    I’m not that far into the book, but I also noted some atheist undertone…

    There was a quote early in the book about Harry being told that a character who had passed away was really good, but someone else telling him that the character had a dark past.

    And people were telling Harry, “don’t worry about that dark stuff… keep your memories about that character positive. Remember them fondly.”

    And Harry was all I can’t CHOOSE what to believe… I have to KNOW the facts… I have to find out. I can’t just believe that this person was all good… I have to KNOW.

    This theme seems to recur… I’ve found it twice so far.

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    I’m also really surprised that the Goddies were out there picketing the book release.

    WTF?!?!? Do they picket every non-Narnia fantasy release?

    I’m glad there was no such nonsense at the big release party in LA… I might have cast a hex on them!

    (BTW, I make a particularly frightening SNAPE!)

  • ash

    i dunno, sounds like the fundies kept the queuing slightly less monotonous – we had no religious comment (hey, england) but the friday-night-at-midnight possibly wasn’t the best idea…we had drunken slurs and got to watch chavs vomit!

    what made me smile most was watching people lurch past who had obviously never mastered anything more advanced than ‘see spot run’ screaming ‘he dies! what’s the point?!’…to which the blatant fatalistic answer is ‘we all die! what’s the point?!’. i didn’t bother, as i didn’t want a kicking…

    ps they hadn’t read the book, so no comment on whether they were right or not…

  • http://misanthropic-bastard.blogspot.com/ Rasputin

    And Harry was all I can’t CHOOSE what to believe… I have to KNOW the facts… I have to find out. I can’t just believe that this person was all good… I have to KNOW.

    That bit got me thinking and if you look deep enough you can find more in all the books. I’m thinking about writing something up on that.

  • anti-nonsense

    I noticed the bit about “you could claim anything is real if the only reason for believing it is that nobody has proven it doesn’t exist” line too. I though that was a great line. Made me wonder about Rowling’s religious background, I don’t recall ever hearing that she’s gone on record as to her religious affliatations and stuff like that made me wonder.

  • Jen

    I was at the same party as you and I didn’t see any religious people acting religious. I did some punk in line without a book yelling “He lives!” and I joked with my friends that while we thought it was a fake spoiler, maybe it was a guy trying to convert us. Why did the cops get mad at the Allah guy?

    I got a much more atheistic view out of the book, overall, though of course they celebrate Christmas and Easter. I think you could view some of it as a hero myth, which Jesus fits, but all in all, I didn’t get a feeling any character was religious in the slightest.

  • Logos

    Why would the cops get mad because someone mentioned Allah?

  • Richard Wade

    Why would the cops get mad because someone mentioned Allah?

    LOL! Hmm. One guess.

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com/ olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    anti-nonsense, Rowlings is on record as being, brace yourselves true unbelievers, a Christian.

    I was surprised at the religious content of the book, though it was clear from the very beginning that there was some. Godparents, Christmas, … That she made her intentions in the last book with what is clearly a near death experience and a feature more than just a bit suggestive of resurrection, quite clear. I thought the book explained some of the things that have gone unsolved in the series rather well.

    The fundamentalists who picked are jerks who are afraid of witches and wizards, or who are told to be. Considering how many people in the United States have read the books and the percentage of the country who profess to be Christians, it’s pretty clear that the majority of readers here are Christians.

    Just out of curiosity, how come blog atheists don’t go after Wiccans and Pagans? How come it’s always stunningly undifferentiated, generic “Christians” that are the focus of the stereotyping ire?

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    Just out of curiosity, how come blog atheists don’t go after Wiccans and Pagans? How come it’s always stunningly undifferentiated, generic “Christians” that are the focus of the stereotyping ire?

    So you’re asking “how come we’re not bigger assholes to wiccans”?

    Isn’t that a question rather like “when did you stop beating your wife?”

    olvlzl, I never had a wiccan tell me I was going to hell. I’ve never seen a wiccan family disown their gay son. I’ve never had friends who were beaten as children because they didn’t believe what the coven taught.

    Those things, and the general health of our home-grown democracy, sometimes causes one to point ire at the perpetrators of these crimes.

    Unless you’re like our President, and when attacked you respond by attacking a completely unimplicated target.

    In that case, yes, by all means, let’s persecute the Wiccans…. They never did anything to us… but why let that stop us?

    I recall you have a personal distaste for Randi… isn’t he always debunking the Hocus-Pocus crowd? Doesn’t that count as “going after the Wiccans”? Let the skeptics debunk the swamis.

    I’m an atheist, my goal is different. My goal is to help the religious to understand that they need to learn to deal better with people with different beliefs, atheists included.

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com/ olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    Siamang, no, I was asking why you don’t stereotype those religions and attribute negative beliefs and actions to all of them. There are plenty of people here who are on record as believing that ALL religion is harmful.

    You know, I’ve never had a Quaker, a member of The Church of the Brethren, or any of hundreds of other Christian denominations tell me any of those things. I’ve encounted many Christians who are universalists who can make a case that the New Testament and parts of the Old Testament support the idea of universal salvation. You ever been damned to hell by a Quaker? By the way, I’ve identified myself as gay so don’t try to pull that one on me.

    Randi seems to go for whatever targets will get him the most attention. I don’t remember him going after Wiccans, maybe he realizes that it might lose him some of his audience. I wonder if Randi has ever tried his debunkery on evolutionary psychology, but, wait, that would be difficult because so much of what they do is nothing but hocus-pocus. Maybe, considering that HH Richard Dawkins has said that he might have to pay up on his phony challenge the great Randi has some incentive to look at these pseudo-sciences with his great powers. I doubt it, though. Dawkins holds the Saint Sagan Chair in “skeptic” circles these days.

  • Maria

    I noticed a few Bible quotes and allusions in this HP book. Amusing. Also, several characters said “Thank God” when a loved-one escaped death. (Althought no-one said it was God’s will when a loved-one did get killed.) I don’t recall anything like this in the previous books.

    I also found the comment “Of course this is happening inside your head. Why should that mean it’s not real?” to be interesting. I won’t say any more about that, because it would be a huge spoiler! I wonder if JKR was giving a measured response to criticism by fundies, and balancing it with some healthy skepticism.

    Loved the book and the way it all worked out, but I still find myself wondering if JKR got a new editor after book 4 or if the publisher stopped trying to edit her because they knew the book would make a ton of money even unedited, because the last 3 books are much flabbier and less tightly structured than the first few (which is not to say that I didn’t love them, and I do realize that the topics became more mature and the story darker as the series went on!)….

    Well, I bet she’s glad to be able to move onto something else now. What a huge accomplishment, to finish a seven-book series!

    I found all this interesting as well.

    olvlzl, I never had a wiccan tell me I was going to hell. I’ve never seen a wiccan family disown their gay son. I’ve never had friends who were beaten as children because they didn’t believe what the coven taught.

    That’s true, Wiccans tend to be pretty laid back. However, I think the point he’s getting at (and I’ve noticed this too) is that some websites and groups (no, not this one! :))will go on and on about how all religion is bad and then focus ONLY on Christianity, and act like ALL the Xtians are bad and are all the same. And I admit it’s frustrating to see stereotypes like that, even though I understand in the bible belt they to tend to fit a certain stereotype. But outside of it they are very diverse just like any group. Just like when a religious person (and I’ve heard plenty of non-Xtian religious person say this) says that all atheists are mean and horrible people-I hate hearing that too.

    I’m an atheist, my goal is different. My goal is to help the religious to understand that they need to learn to deal better with people with different beliefs, atheists included.

    That’s an admirable goal

    anti-nonsense, Rowlings is on record as being, brace yourselves true unbelievers, a Christian.

    I was surprised at the religious content of the book, though it was clear from the very beginning that there was some. Godparents, Christmas, … That she made her intentions in the last book with what is clearly a near death experience and a feature more than just a bit suggestive of resurrection, quite clear. I thought the book explained some of the things that have gone unsolved in the series rather well.

    The fundamentalists who picked are jerks who are afraid of witches and wizards, or who are told to be. Considering how many people in the United States have read the books and the percentage of the country who profess to be Christians, it’s pretty clear that the majority of readers here are Christians.

    These are good points. And it’s true, I’ve said this on here before, JK Rowling is Presbytyrian. That’s why it’s so hilarious the fundies go after her. Most Xtians I know love the Harry Potter books. I actually picked up several subtle religious overtones in the book, but along with a healthy skepticism. She’s pretty liberal from what I understand. The book was excellent.

  • profquad

    This seems like as good a place as any to express my thoughts on the role of Jesus in the Harry Potter world.
    Obviously, they celebrate Christian holidays, and in a purely wizard culture, they are clearly not just doing it to save face among the Muggles. Also, everything that Jesus did in the Bible which acted as proof of his divinity are easily done using magic. It is possible that he was just a powerful or early or pioneering wizard, so he is celebrated by the wizarding community.
    However, assuming that he was a wizard, the only way for him to have risen from the dead would be to have created a Horcrux. And the only way to create a Horcrux is to murder someone.
    Jesus was a murderer.

  • Jen

    Just out of curiosity, how come blog atheists don’t go after Wiccans and Pagans? How come it’s always stunningly undifferentiated, generic “Christians” that are the focus of the stereotyping ire?

    Maybe because there aren’t as many stories in the media about what Wiccans are doing this week? For the record, though, just a week ago there was that “Homer in a field next to the pagan thingy” and everyone in the atheist blogosphere made fun of the pagans that were going to get their revenge with rain.

    Also, I bet if you were to poll all the atheist blogosphere, you would find more former Christians than any other religion or, for that matter, people raised atheist. People talk about what they know. I think Christians, Muslims, Pagans, and Wiccans all equally believe silly things, but in my day to day life, one of those groups is much more likely to affect me personally and politically.

    Also, while not all Christians believe X, Y, and Z, they are all using the same starting point. As I have a problem with that starting point, I do tend to lump them together, because all their conclusions based on said starting point are flawed.

    anti-nonsense, Rowlings is on record as being, brace yourselves true unbelievers, a Christian.

    And my father is on record as being a Catholic. Doesn’t mean he cares about it in the slightest, or knows anything (since his church as a child did all their masses in Latin). Do we have any idea how religious JKR is?

    I’ll agree there was some vague Christ imagery, but much of the Christ imagery is really just generic literary hero archtype.

  • http://www.celebrateauthors.com jesica

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  • Maria

    Do we have any idea how religious JKR is?

    http://www.accio-quote.org/articles/1999/1099-post-weeks.htm

    http://www.accio-quote.org/articles/2000/1000-vancouversun-wyman.htm

    Well, she’s a member of the church of Scotland and evidently cared enough to have her daughter baptized. In the second article she quotes that she is indeed a Christian who believes in God. just wondering, why does it matter? would it bother you if she was religious? would you consider her the same as Pat Robertson? Does a person have to be non-religious for you to respect them? Personally I don’t care. I pay attention to who the person is and what they do. some of the best attacks on the religious right have come from liberal believers who support secularism.

  • Dana

    Also, while not all Christians believe X, Y, and Z, they are all using the same starting point. As I have a problem with that starting point, I do tend to lump them together, because all their conclusions based on said starting point are flawed.

    This is the exact same argument I’ve heard some religious people say about all atheists……..

  • http://www.skepchick.org writerdd

    Christianity Today seems to think that the Harry Potter saga has turned into some kind of Christian allegory:

    Something similar seems to have happened to J.K. Rowling. She began writing about wizards and quidditch and Bertie Botts Every Flavor Beans, and somewhere along the way, Christ began to whisper into the story.
    And the whole world was listening.

    All the talk about JKR’s religiosity cracks me up. Of course we’ll never know if she doesn’t choose to talk about it, but there are SO many people who are nominally religious or religuos for the sake of tradition, including a majority of Americans in my opinion, that just because she’s a member of a church or has her child baptized says absolutely nothing about her actual beliefs or dedication to the teachings of a church or to the teachings of the Bible, for that matter.

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    Maria, as soon as I read that JKR was a fan of Jessica Mitford I knew she couldn’t be a bad egg.

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    I thought you thought everyone was a bad egg.

    You ever been damned to hell by a Quaker?

    You know, Olvizi, I’ve never MET a Quaker. They’re vanishingly rare.

    Met a hella lotta fundies, thought. All those things I list, damning to hell, splitting a family in two, beating a child for their unbelief, are things from my personal circle of friends.

    So which am I likely to react to? People I know personally and their lives, or some Quaker that I’m sure I’d love if I met, but haven’t met.

  • monkeymind

    I’ve never MET a Quaker.


    http://www.quakerfinder.org/

    No more excuses! And talk about friendly… they invented it.

  • Richard Wade

    Looking for Biblical symbolism in Harry Potter or The Lord of the Rings is kind of like looking for faces in the clouds. With enough imagination you can see anything you want. Some of the symbolic allusions I’ve heard proposed are really a stretch worthy of an Olympic gymnast.

    If you must see these works as anything more than a white hat/black hat western then it’s much easier to see a historical symbolism of the period just before World War II. Both stories center around the aftermath of an unfinished war where a great evil was put down but not destroyed. It is returning and now the children of those killed in the first war must take up the fight again.

    Why not just enjoy a wonderfully told tale and forget about finding faces in the clouds?

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com/ olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    Siamang, why do you think that other people who haven’t beaten a child for unbelief are responsible for that act? That’s the very definition of stereotyping and prejudice.

    Ok, you’ve talked me into it. I’m going to go join a Quaker meeting, there should be a lot more Quakers than there are now.

  • alexus

    HAHAHA yes i also drew a connection to fundies when i read that.. in fact as soon as Character 1 said that, I started to hate his guts. I’m so glad that Character 2 spazzed right after! too bad he/she ended up being wrong! :P

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    Siamang, why do you think that other people who haven’t beaten a child for unbelief are responsible for that act? That’s the very definition of stereotyping and prejudice.

    They are hardly responsible for that act. I stand by what I wrote before. People can take my comments as they are, as you are a poor sum-upper.

    If you want the very small minority Quakers to wash away the sins of modern Christendom, I will bring to bear the larger group of Christians who in my experience have unleashed nastiness and wielded political power sufficent to draw the negative attention of atheists.

    I never said that the minority controls the whole. I never said the majority bears responsibility for the minority.

    I merely said that Christians probably receive more attention than Wiccans because of our experiences.

    You can wave a handful of Quakers at us all you want… it doesn’t erase our own experiences.

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com/ olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    I will bring to bear the larger group of Christians who in my experience have unleashed nastiness and wielded political power sufficent to draw the negative attention of atheists.

    Individuals bear responsibility for the evil that they do, people who don’t do rotten things aren’t responsible for those who do. If the majority of Christians in the United States were actively involved in evil doing then things would be a hell of a lot worse then they are now. Pretending that the majority of people who call themselves Christians are actively engaged in doing you wrong is not only vastly unrealistic and unjust, it’s paranoid.

    As for those who do evil through politics, they’re only calling themselves Christians, they are actually worshipers of Mammon. Since Jesus warned that you can’t serve both God and Mammon, that would seem to be an acid test as to the genuineness of their profession. Authoritative, you might say.

    If someone has done you wrong then why don’t you complain about that person instead of smearing an entire group? Doesn’t it kind of make sense?

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com/ olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    Oh, by the way, Siamang . I seem to remember that Albert Einstein wished there were more Quakers in the world. Come to think of it, I seem to remember dear old Bertie Russell had nice things to say about them too. Considering he divorced one that’s saying something. You guys can’t keep up with even that generation of atheists.

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    Pretending that the majority of people who call themselves Christians are actively engaged in doing you wrong is not only vastly unrealistic and unjust, it’s paranoid.

    Did I use the word “majority”?

    No I didn’t. I said “I will bring to bear the larger group of Christians who in my experience have unleashed nastiness and wielded political power sufficent to draw the negative attention of atheists.”

    I confine my criticism to that group of Christians who have done nastyness and wielded political power destructively. I think it is a minority group of Christians who have done this, but I do think that this minority is a larger group than the entire number of American Quakers, of which there are about 100,000 in the United States.

    Please respond to the things I write, and not to the things you imagine I may be writing.

  • monkeymind

    olvzl, cool thy jets! The only negative thing Siamang about Quakers was that they were rare! Most Friends I know agree with Siamang about the bulk of people who call themselves Christians, it’s why they are Friends and not evangelicals or whatnot. In fact I recently saw a pamphlet for Quaker youth on how to deal with fundie kids on the playground telling them they were going to hell, not really saved, and all that crap.
    Siamang, you may actually have met some Friends, they don’t say thee and thou any more or dress like the guy on the Quaker Oats box.

  • Jen

    Well, she’s a member of the church of Scotland and evidently cared enough to have her daughter baptized. In the second article she quotes that she is indeed a Christian who believes in God. just wondering, why does it matter? would it bother you if she was religious? would you consider her the same as Pat Robertson? Does a person have to be non-religious for you to respect them? Personally I don’t care. I pay attention to who the person is and what they do. some of the best attacks on the religious right have come from liberal believers who support secularism.

    I hope I didn’t come off as really caring one way or another about what religion JK is. I just think its funny that every time the Christians burn her books, we laugh over her Christianity, and yet I personally had no idea if she was actually religious or just a checks-the-box Christian. I was just speculating, based on how little religion is in the book.

  • http://off-the-map.org/atheist/ Siamang

    Monkeymind,

    I have no doubt I have met a Quaker and not known it. Odds are good that I’ve met a few, living in a politically liberal city.

    I see that they also welcome nontheists to be Friends. Quite a forward-thinking group.

    http://www.nontheistfriends.org/

  • Maria

    I hope I didn’t come off as really caring one way or another about what religion JK is. I just think its funny that every time the Christians burn her books, we laugh over her Christianity, and yet I personally had no idea if she was actually religious or just a checks-the-box Christian. I was just speculating, based on how little religion is in the book.

    Hi Jen, no, actually I didn’t think you did once I took a good look at what you said. I was just asking if it would matter to you but I probably didn’t phrase it right. Sorry if I sounded rude. I agree with what you said above. It is quite ironic isn’t it? I’ve scared many fundie Xtians by telling them she is one herself……..

    Maria, as soon as I read that JKR was a fan of Jessica Mitford I knew she couldn’t be a bad egg.

    Who is Jessica Mitford? Sorry, don’t know…..can you tell me please?

    You know, Olvizi, I’ve never MET a Quaker. They’re vanishingly rare.

    True enough, they are rare. I have met some. They are very nice, at least from my experience. They actually remind me a lot of the Bahai’s-another very peacful (and very persecuted, especially in the Middle East) religion. Does anyone here know any Bahais? Just curious, I know it’s off topic but just wanted to ask. I’ve met some and was pretty impressed by them-I went to a meeting with a friend who is Bahai. They knew my beliefs (or lack thereof) and didn’t seem to mind it. We had a mutual respect of one another.

    Looking for Biblical symbolism in Harry Potter or The Lord of the Rings is kind of like looking for faces in the clouds. With enough imagination you can see anything you want. Some of the symbolic allusions I’ve heard proposed are really a stretch worthy of an Olympic gymnast.

    If you must see these works as anything more than a white hat/black hat western then it’s much easier to see a historical symbolism of the period just before World War II. Both stories center around the aftermath of an unfinished war where a great evil was put down but not destroyed. It is returning and now the children of those killed in the first war must take up the fight again.

    Why not just enjoy a wonderfully told tale and forget about finding faces in the clouds?

    well said!

  • http://olvlzl.blogspot.com/ olvlzl, no ism, no ist

    Maria, Jessica Mitford was the wonderful author of The American Way of Death and A Fine Old Conflict and other wonderful things. Maybe the best way to begin is by reading the late and wonderful Molly Ivins’ obituary for Decca.

  • Jen

    Maria- no worries, you did come off a little strong, but Dawkins knows I have here too, so believe me when I say there is no judgement. I do enjoy that she is a Christian, considering how the fundies have their underwear in a twist about those books converting their children to Satanism. I don’t care what religion she is myself; that said, if her books were really Jesus-y, I probably wouldn’t read them.

    Re: the Quakers

    The only Quaker I know is my aunt, who converted. This particular aunt switches religions on a fairly regular basis, which has always amused me. She never seems to be “regular” Christian, though, and she was raised as such.

  • Karen

    Siamang:

    (BTW, I make a particularly frightening SNAPE!)

    LOL! I can SO see you as Snape, Siamang! :-)

    I have no doubt I have met a Quaker and not known it. Odds are good that I’ve met a few, living in a politically liberal city.

    I’m sure you have. They’re very liberal and very political, at least the ones I know, and pretty much opposite of evangelicals and fundamentalists in every issue except for – you know – the gospel and all that. ;-)

    The American Friends Service Committee is very involved with justice and sanctuary for Central American refugees, and other pro-immigrant causes – quite the unpopular issue, these days!

  • Gillian

    There a few christian references throughout the HP series. However, there are also atheistic, Pagan and Buddhist themes are laced throughout the whole series as well. Especially the Buddhist themes. But here’s the rub. It doesn’t matter what faith or non-faith you’re from. Everyone will relate to the series, as they would any fiction. Why? Because it’s not about religious experience. There is no christian morality. There is no Pagan morality. There is no Muslim, Jew or Atheist morality. There’s only human morality. Regardless of what faith or non-faith, culture or ethnic background we come from, as humans we have the same experiences. We know love, loss, anger, confusion, deal with duality in our character, etc., etc. Anyone from any background can look at just about any piece of fiction and relate to it in one way or another. Theology/Mythology, they all have themes of human experiences because they were written by humans, laced with a bit of mysticism, idealism, supernaturalism and lots of metaphor to add flavor.

    To be honest, there were less christian themes in the HP series than there were of a few other belief systems.

  • Giulia

    Kind of late reply… but for me, those who rely on ‘Jesus the savior’ are too weak to fix their own problems. It’s like a support system with a low possibility of working, and jeebus, theres so much scientific research out there that shows people can heal themselves with their own minds, like the ‘nam myoho renge kyo’ chanters. granted, thats a religion itself, although its more like a philosophy, but if we just rely on ourselves…

    hitler was not a really traditional christian, incidently, he was christian, but didn’t embrace everything of it. so it depends on the person more or less, but the religions aren’t really to blame (Except the stupid parts in the religious texts) its people who twist things negatively. (usually)


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