Ask an Atheist

There are atheist blogs all over the place, books about the subject, and web pages on non-religion that you will never have enough time to read through.

Still, it’s good to know there are young people like Shane who are able and willing to answer your questions about atheism. His responses are simply matter-of-fact about the way things are. He’s not trying to push any buttons.

Atheists are a very diverse bunch and I have been around many atheists. It seems as if there isn’t that much in common between you guys.

You also really do not have that much of a doctrine to inquire about. But I do have a question:

How come atheists target Christianity? I think it is merely targeted only because it is what most of you were raised in close proximity to on English speaking forums.

However, there are all sorts of complaints you can lodge against a plethora of religions.

You also seemingly investigated and stopped only at Christianity, why is that?

Thanks.

Atheists don’t solely target Christianity, but Atheists in the United States do tend to place more emphasis on Christianity than other religions simply because 75% of the United States claims to be Christian.
What most Christians don’t realize is that their religion isn’t the only one. When I call myself an atheist and people seem stunned that I don’t believe in god, they rarely realize that god isn’t a proper noun. “God” is not the one and only god. When Christians refer to god, usually they’re referring to Yahweh. It’s therefore interesting to note that when I asked a group of 10 self-proclaimed Christians who Yahweh is, 7 of them had no idea what I was talking about.

I’m sure that none of you believe the creator of the universe is Zeus, or Aker, or Allah, or Poseidon, or Zenu, despite the fact that they are all gods. And there are still people today who believe in all of these. In fact over 1 billion people worship Allah rather than Jesus Christ.

As for me, as I said earlier I’ve read not only the Bible, but the Book of Mormon, the Qur’an, and the Torah. I can tell you specific arguments for each religion, as well as contradictions and errors in each text, but find that most of my responses apply not only to Christianity, Islam, or Judaism, but rather to religion as a whole.

Keep in mind that there are billions of people who look at Yahweh and Jesus Christ the same way you look at Poseidon, Athena, or Zenu.

“We’re all atheists, I just go one god further.”

Be his friend. Send him some appreciative words. We need more people doing what he’s doing.

And while you’re at it, check out this site’s own short-and-sweet “Atheist F.A.Q.

(Thanks to Mriana for the link!)


[tags]atheist, atheism, MySpace[/tags]

  • http://stereoroid.com/ brian t

    A similar question was posed on AskTheAtheist.com recently, phrased as “do you respect Islam more than Christianity?“. If there was a consensus, it’s along the lines of “Christianity is what we know best”. I’d not be much good in a debate against an Islamic scholar…

  • Mriana

    You’re welcome. Hopefully this goes well for him and others learn something from his page. :)

  • http://atheistrevolution.blogspot.com/ vjack

    Actually, there are several atheists doing this. See http://www.asktheatheists.com/

  • http://revolutheran.blogspot.com RevoLutheran

    I just wanted to point out that God of Christians is the same as Allah for the Muslims (and also Yahweh for the Jews, but that was acknowledged in the post). In fact, Christians in arab countries such as Palestine actually use the name Allah when referring to God.

    Jews, Christians, and Muslims all worship “the God of Abraham” — the same diety. I acknowledge that many Jews, Christians, and Muslims might miss this point, but do some research on it if you want…Yahweh = God = Yahweh.

    That’s all — just wanted to clarify. :-)

  • Stephen

    I just wanted to point out that God of Christians is the same as Allah for the Muslims

    Not under any meaningful usage of the word “same”. The central tenet of Christianity is that God’s son came to earth in human form. The central tenet of Islam is that Allah is one alone, and the Koran explicitly denies that he has a son. That the two share a common origin is not in doubt, but they are certainly not the same.

  • Mriana

    I use to think they were the same, but upon closer inspection, they are not quite the same. Common origin is about all they do have in common.

    I think Stephen said it best with his explanation.