Keep an Eye on This Student

Ms. SuperScience at Beautiful Biology gave her AP Biology students a questionnaire to fill out during the first week of school. She asked the kids a number of questions so she can learn about who they are and what makes them tick.

Fairly normal procedure.

Now, look at one student’s response to the prompt, “Tell me three things that I should know about you“:

Student E: I was born in Czechoslovakia. I attended [ ] Elementary School. I believe that all people are sinners and desperately need the mercy of Jesus Christ to forgive our sins.

Ok… Next question: “What topics in biology do you find most interesting and why?”

Same student:

Student E: evolution, because people all over are denying that a loving God made the Earth especially for us. Oh, and molecular chemistry, for understanding what really drives bodily functions and natural phenomena.

Oh boy.

Ms. SuperScience feels the same way you do:

Sooooo- bets on how long before Student E feels the need to either confront me or try to convert me?… I’m anticipating something by the end of next week. Also, his parents could be a lot of fun at open house… I’d assume they are similar as this type of belief usually comes from home.

For what it’s worth, I finished my second week of teaching high school math. So far, no student in any of my classes has made a comment about eBay or atheism or the book.

That’s a good thing. I’d like to keep it that way as long as possible.

I am curious about when someone will find out, though… the betting is open. Make your picks.


[tags]atheist, atheism, intelligent design, creationism, science[/tags]

  • Kate

    *headdesk*

    WHY won’t more people realize that accepting evolution and belief in God AREN’T mutually exclusive things?!?! Morons…

    Funny, my AP Bio teacher was religious too, Catholic. But not stupid. Evolution was her favorite topic.

  • The Unbrainwashed

    Kate,
    They are mutually exclusive beliefs. The processes that drive evolution are indicative of an independent system. Injecting a personal God into a process that contradicts such a being is logically flawed and the symptom of a deluded, compartmentalized mind.

  • Jen

    When I was in high school, I don’t think I ever knew what religion (or lack thereof) any of my teachers followed. And I remember my bio teacher starting the semester off with something along the lines of “I am not saying anything about your religion, I am here to teach science”. In college, teachers were more open about what they believed in, but my anthro class still started out with the same speech.

    Had he not taught at a Catholic college, I suspect my anthro teacher would have said something more along the lines of, “Your religion is stupid, and science is right whenever the your religion and facts do not mesh”. I would pay good money for a teacher not to kiss ass when it comes to evolution.

    I suspect the answer to when your students will connect you to your book is around the time the first one gets really mad at you and googles your name. Then again, I never did that in high school because my teachers were old and boring and not interesting like all the people my age.

  • Susan

    Keep us posted on how the math teaching goes! I’m hoping (in the way-off future) to become a math professor, and I’ve enjoyed the math tutoring I’ve done in the meantime. I’d be interested in hearing about your experiences.

  • http://thinktoomuch.net/ Hugo

    “The Unbrainwashed”, I understand how you think. Of course, “the brainwashed” don’t think like that. Especially when dealing with adults (who have “settled” world-views), keeping the two linked isn’t advantageous. Pointing out that CS Lewis accepted evolution could show them a way to embrace science without giving up cherished beliefs.

    Yes, this might undermine the agenda to get them to give up cherished beliefs, but at that you won’t succeed anyway. How about encouraging the acceptance of science, and then place your hopes on the next generation?

    “Liberal Christianity” is an interesting thing…

  • Kate

    The Unbrainwashed – no. A lot of people are mistaken. Do yourself a favor and read “Finding Darwin’s God” by Ken Miller. Pure brilliance.

    Not. Mutually. Exclusive.

    Just because you believe in God doesn’t mean you have to belief in the *poof* “it happened!” creationism lies.

  • miller

    Hemant, I bet that within a year, you’ll get a student come up to you and say how cool you are!


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