To Bid or Not to Bid

If you bid a lot of money on this wafer, you win the eBay auction.

If you *don’t* bid a lot of money on this wafer, we all win the eBay auction.

But if you’re a true Christian, you just have to ask yourself: How much is Jesus worth? :)

Brilliant marketing, I say.

A priest gave me a consecrated communion wafer when I last attended Catholic mass. Instead of eating it right then and there, I decided to save it for a later time.

Oddly enough, I happened to see parts of Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ that very same day which has filled my mind with numerous ideas. I’ve glued together a couple popsicle sticks, have three thumbtacks, a needle, and a thorny stem from a rose.

If this auction does not reach an appropriate amount, I will reenact the film with my wafer. I’m rather creative so I’ll take artistic license with the wafer, perhaps lighting it aflame or placing it in other unsavory situations or locations, such as the bathroom. I’ll be sure to make a video for all to enjoy should that be the case.

I say “appropriate amount” because I want to objectively measure the worth of the Lord Jesus Christ. Setting an arbitrary amount would not allow me to do so.

(Thanks to Janice for the link!)


[tags]atheist, atheism, eBay, Jesus, Catholic, Christian[/tags]

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  • http://emergingpensees.com Mike C

    ummm, I think this would only be meaningful to Catholics. They’re the only ones who think that the communion wafers literally are the body of Christ. (Well, and I guess the Eastern Orthodox too.) The rest of us believe them to be “only” symbolic to one degree or another. (Though I put “only” in quotes since I don’t think there is anything insignificant about a symbol. Human existence consists largely of symbols.)

  • Jen

    This is so fantastic that I may actually stop breathing from laughter.

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  • http://viva-freemania.blogspot.com/ Tom Freeman

    “if you’re a true Christian, you just have to ask yourself: How much is Jesus worth?”

    Surely the question ought to be: What would Jesus bid?

  • Mriana

    It seems the seller removed the “wafer”. It’s no longer on that link at least. Of course, if someone bought it… I wonder how much money they are out of for buying it?

  • http://paxnortona.notfrisco2.com Joel Sax

    I can tell you why the link was removed, Mriana: it was offensive to Catholics! (You don’t muck with the holy cracker! Especially if it has been blessed because you’re mucking with The Body and Blood of Christ the Crispy!)

    Now, mind you, the same people don’t mind if you sell tortillas that appear to have thin crust in the shape of the Virgin Mary….I wonder what it is like to eat her?

    Is that blasphemy against the Spirit or just a bad joke?

    Tom: Jesus wouldn’t bid because he wouldn’t be carrying money?

  • Mriana

    Now, mind you, the same people don’t mind if you sell tortillas that appear to have thin crust in the shape of the Virgin Mary….I wonder what it is like to eat her?

    Maybe as satisfying as eating the Chocolate Jesus. :lol:

    Is that blasphemy against the Spirit or just a bad joke?

    Just a bad joke.

    So, when are people going to learn that that little round wafer thin cracker is nothing but symbolism? Ever notice how it looks like a sunny halo when you put the cup in front of it? Yup, it’s also the same halo around JC’s head or symbol of it. It’s also the sun, just as the halo deal around JC. I’d continue, but you all can guess where I’m going with all of this.

    Second question, when are people going to learn to do their research and find out where all these symbols and alike originated and all?

  • http://paxnortona.notfrisco2.com Joel Sax

    Mriana, if you were educated in Catholic schools like I was, you’d know that the communion wafer is the Body and Blood of Christ. You are not to touch it, drop it on the floor, etc. In Catholic dogma, it’s much more than a symbol.

    Methinks you were raised Episcopalian or something like that.

  • Mriana

    No, I wasn’t raised Episcopalian, but I did become an Episcopalian after I left home at 19 and spent almost 20 years in the Episcopal Church, which made a little more sense to me than what I was raised and far nicer to people also. I was sort of raised Evangelical Fundamentalist. What I mean by sort of, is that we went to church only when we visited my FM minister great uncle and his wife or my Church of God grandparents. When my mother became “born again” when I was 14 and had my uncle baptize us both (she lived under the philosophy “when mama is cold, baby wears a sweater” even when I was 14) she took me to a Lutheran Church (ELCA) because she knew I would fight her about an Evangelical Fundie church. Meanwhile, the only thing I got out of the baptism (in a river) was swimmer’s ear. :roll: Gee, thanks Father, Son, and H.G., but a T-shirt would have been nicer.

    I wanted to make my own choices when I left home at 19 and I was free to explore my religious questions in the Episcopal Church too. So, I killed two birds with one stone- my own insatiable questions and an answer for my relatives when they asked if I was going to church. I’m getting it now though, because my answer to their question is “no”.

  • http://paxnortona.notfrisco2.com Joel Sax

    Mriana, just remember the Vatican Rag when you think of things Catholic:

    Two, four, six, eight
    Time to trans-substantiate!

    ;)

  • Mriana

    I’ll get my magic wand. :lol:


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