Ignorance of Atheism

How many incorrect stereotypes can you cram into one letter-to-the-editor?

Let’s find out:

Atheism: A life without purpose

The article “Atheists find sanctuary at gathering” (Oct. 12, Page A-6) leaves me puzzled. Doesn’t this seem like anarchists forming a political party?

If they were successful in their goals, would our money say “In No God We Trust”? Or perhaps, “We Trust In No One”? (Should “No One” be in small letters to avoid any semblance of a higher being?)

I wonder if atheists are more likely to be depressed than people of faith and, as a result, spend more for medical care. Should this be considered truth in advertising?

When atheists claim that religion has caused such harm, do they include the work being done every day in soup kitchens and homeless shelters? Are they complaining about the food quality or the accommodations? (Have they ever volunteered their time?)

I feel bad for the atheists. Their life must seem like such a dead end. Unfortunately some seed has been scattered on rocks. I’ll pray for them anyway, even though they must think I’m talking to myself.

GREG MASZTAL

Oakdale

I counted 329847932 remarks that are flat-out wrong or that can be responded to with a simple one-word answer.

One thing is clear: This guy knows next to nothing about atheism. He has probably never spoken to an openly atheistic person.

And he wants the public to know it.


[tags]atheist, atheism, Modesto Bee[/tags]

  • Stephen

    Wait, I found one correct statement in the entire letter:

    “I’ll pray for them anyway, even though they must think I’m talking to myself.”

  • FromUpNorth

    If they were successful in their goals, would our money say “In No God We Trust”?

    I wonder if Mr. Masztal can find any other justification for the current motto other than the will of a national majority. If it is right and proper for a theist national majority to have “In God We Trust” inscribed on the coinage, what would be wrong and improper with having “In No God We Trust” inscribed on the coinage should that be the will of some future atheist national majority? To what could he possibly object?

  • Mriana

    I think this guy misses the point. Originally that was not on money before 1957. Before that there were a number of slogans, my favourite being, “mind your business”, which I think Ben Franklin came up with. IF we have to have a slogan, that would be my first choice.

  • FromUpNorth

    I think this guy misses the point. Originally that was not on money before 1957.

    Actually, “In God We Trust” first appeared on U.S. coins during the Civl War, by act of Congress. It was adopted as the national motto of the United States in 1956, again, by act of Congress. See the U.S. Treasury’s official fact sheet on the history of “In God We Trust,” http://www.treas.gov/education/fact-sheets/currency/in-god-we-trust.shtml .

    These acts of Congress were prima facie violations of the First Amendment, which declares, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion….”

  • Polly

    Well, he got one right.

    I’ll pray for them anyway, even though they must think I’m talking to myself.

  • Atheistyouth

    wow, that man has so many misconceptions. the idea sisn’t to chang what it says it is to remove it. and if he’s trusting god to his money how does he justify inflation or the ever decreasing value of the dollar on a international scale?

    I think he may be whining to himself.

  • http://oproject.wordpress.com Hamish MacPherson

    Hey Hehmant

    I saw this too, was about to blog it but ended up not knowing where to start concluding that it didn’t even deserve derision! I hope he actually talks to an atheist one day


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