Send Your Kid to Camp Quest West (for Free!)

If you’re interested in sending your 6-8th grade child to Camp Quest West (in California), you have a chance to win a free campership!

All the child has to do is write a 200-400 word essay (DOC) answering any one of these three questions:

1. Should Intelligent Design be taught in school along with evolution? Why or why not?

2. What, if anything, does evolution tell us about the interconnectedness of life and how we should treat each other?

3. Is science the only way of knowing about the universe, or are there other ways of knowing? Explain.

If your child’s essay is the winner, you get bragging rights all summer. Definitely worth applying for.

The deadline is March 15th.

Go here for more details.

(via A Whore in the Temple of Reason)


[tags]atheist, atheism[/tags]

  • http://www.camp-quest.org/ WayBeyondSoccerMom

    My children attended Camp Quest West last year, and they had a terrific time. I cannot recommend it highly enough. It was well-run, the children were well-cared for, and my kids had a blast. They loved their counselors.

    BTW, my children have attended several sleep away camps, and Camp Quest West was the best one so far.

    Even if your child doesn’t win or even enter the essay contest, the camp is well worth checking out for your child this summer.

  • http://emergingpensees.com MikeClawson

    1. Should Intelligent Design be taught in school along with evolution? Why or why not?

    What if the child answers “yes”? Do they still have a shot at the scholarship?

  • Siamang

    I think so, Mike.

    If I taught high-school biology, I’d teach about Intelligent Design. I don’t think you can get around it at this point, if you’re covering evolution.

    But no, I wouldn’t teach it as science. I’d use it to illustrate the difference between the methodical process of experiment, verification, peer-review, publishing and the slow hard work of proving your ideas and getting them accepted by the majority of your field, and the process of winning a school board election.

    Just as scientists do not perform experiments to choose who goes on a school board, school boards cannot look at their election results to see what is and isn’t science.

  • K

    OOooooh, thanks for this. Junior is eagerly anticipating what he’s going to write and he thinks he’s going to win.


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