Which Secret Will the Person Tell?

Which would be a greater shock to this person’s parents…?

obama.jpg

(via PostSecret)


[tags]atheist, atheism, Barack Obama[/tags]

  • Tony

    In their (likely) very narrow worldview, I’d say they protest being an Atheist….they can (with time) likely get over voting for a black christian.

  • http://ecstathy.blogspot.com efrique

    Tell them Obama is God – that might take the curse off it.

  • Mriana

    My mother, who I have mentioned before is an Evangelical Fundie, is not troubled that I am voting for Obama. She has gotten use to me, over the years, of looking in a person’s heart, so to speak, rather than what is on the outside. In fact, I think I convinced her to vote for Obama. :D Now, if I told her I was a non-theist, she’d go insane. Shoot! She went insane just hearing what I had to say about Bishop Spong and screamed into the phone, “THAT IS NOT CHRISTIAN!” Then I got the inquisition. So, I don’t dare tell her what I don’t believe.

    The sad thing is, she thinks she knows me, but she hasn’t gotten to actually know me. sigh. Maybe getting to know my political views is one step in that direction though. Who knows.

  • Darryl

    Even fundamentalists realize that choosing Obama will have more to do with the price of gas next year than choosing God.

  • I like tea

    Hey, that secret could have been submitted by me. It wasn’t, but it could have been.

    they can (with time) likely get over voting for a black christian.

    It’s probably that he’s Democrat, not that he’s black. Fundamentalist Christians tend to tie the Republican party platform to God’s Will.

  • Nick

    A friend’s girlfriend has a Lutheran minister for a father. When she mentioned that she was considering voting for Obama, he flipped out — apparently he thouoght that Obama coming into power was one of the signs of the apocalypse and that she was NOT allowed to vote for him.

    More fun: my friend’s Jewish and he and his girlfriend argue over how the kids would be raised and whether the marriage should be in a church or a temple. My suggestions, “Take the kids to both places” and “Why not make up your own ceremony with pieces of both religions and go to a UU church for it?” were laughed down. Oh well.

    (When I saw this, I *immediately* thought of her. As far as I know, though, she’s still pretty religious.)

  • http://josephbales.com Joey

    My parents both know I’m voting for Obama as I’ve made no attempt to hide it. My Dad couldn’t really understand it because he just discovered the internet and thinks that everything you read on there is true, especially the parts about Obama being a Muslim. I sorta convinced him that part isn’t true, but I still think he’s skeptical.

    Neither parent knows that I’m an atheist although I did manage to work up the courage to put the scarlet A on my blog this week. I don’t think my Dad would care, but my mom might.

  • Ada

    My parents wouldn’t like knowing that I’m voting for Obama, but they’d definitely be more upset if they found out I’m an atheist. There have definitely been elections where I could have made a postcard like this, but even my crazy parents can admit that all the choices this year pretty much suck. The fact that they know McCain isn’t a great choice either really takes the sting out of voting for someone else.

  • TXatheist

    If I told my parents I was voting for McCain they’d look at me funny. Only my brother in all of my side of the family is voting for McBush and that’s because of his darn wife who got him to become a devoted xian.

  • http://del.icio.us/jcchurch James

    My parents were already offended when I told them I was voting for John Kerry in the last election. I still haven’t told them that I’m not a believer.

  • http://mollishka.blogspot.com mollishka

    Naivite: I really don’t understand how these two things could be on par with one another.

    A more interesting question: would parents find being not straight or not Christian worse/more shocking/more problematic?

  • EKM

    I like tea said

    It’s probably that he’s Democrat, not that he’s black. Fundamentalist Christians tend to tie the Republican party platform to God’s Will.

    Have you read Thy Kingdom Come: How the Religious Right Distorts the Faith and Threatens America by Randall Balmer? He makes the case that the Repub agenda is anti-Christian. Jesus said his followers should look after the poor, yet the Repub agenda is all about corporations. And he also thinks it is ironic that a lot of Christians have environmentalism, even though they think that they have a duty to preserve God’s creation, but instead support a party that pushes policies that favor corporations over people.

    A long time ago I saw George Carlin on TV, I think in the 1980s. He said something that I think holds true today: Republicans care about property rights, and Democrats care about people’s rights.

  • Polly

    I would have a much easier time telling my mother that I’m voting for Obama (IFF Nader isn’t on the ballot), than ever telling her I don’t believe in god.

    My mother still hangs on to the claim that Obama is a Muslim. (My wife occasionally expresses doubt about his loyalty to the USA because she suspects he still might be)
    When I bring up those last 20 years in a xian church, my mother says, “have you heard what his rev. Wright said about America?”
    me: So?

  • chancelikely

    It’s really weird for me since my mother and I can’t exactly talk religion anymore (I’m an out atheist, and she doesn’t want to hear about it), but she listens to my political opinions, and, after thirty-four years of voting exclusively for Republicans, in 2006 she mentioned casually that she had voted for all the candidates I had said I supported.

    So I’ve apparently got her ear when it comes to politics but not when it comes to religion. Weird.

  • Mriana

    Nick said,

    June 10, 2008 at 6:19 am

    A friend’s girlfriend has a Lutheran minister for a father. When she mentioned that she was considering voting for Obama, he flipped out — apparently he thouoght that Obama coming into power was one of the signs of the apocalypse and that she was NOT allowed to vote for him.

    Doesn’t she know once she gets into that voting booth no one has control of who she votes for? My grandfather tried to tell me who to vote for when I was 18. I told him, “Thank you for your advice, but when I get into that voting booth, I will vote who I want.” He was irrate, but when I got into that voting booth, I didn’t vote for Reagan. I voted for who I wanted to vote for and she can do the same thing. No one is allowed to stand there and force her hand, because that is illegal. If she wants to vote for Obama, she should once she gets into that voting booth.

  • http://mygoddlessdrama.blogspot.com/ Stacy

    I think Obama is secretly an atheist. No one can think outside the box like this, have this much tolerance and global thought, CARE about the future of our planet 9 a very non christian thing to do in my opinion) and believe in God. Thoughts?

  • http://heathendad.blogspot.com/ HappyNat

    (My wife occasionally expresses doubt about his loyalty to the USA because she suspects he still might be)

    Your wife doesn’t think Muslims can be loyal to America?

    So I’ve apparently got her ear when it comes to politics but not when it comes to religion. Weird.

    Or maybe the Repulicans have been so dishonest, greedy, and inept she finally stopped voting for them. Not to discount your influence . . . :)

  • Ubi Dubium

    I think if he is secretly an atheist, he had better be VERY secret about it if he wants to win this election. Sad, really. A genuine crazy preacher and fabrications of his secretly being a Muslim have not really hurt his campaign, but that would. Sigh.

  • Polly

    For all those who think Obama is such a dramatic departure from Bush,
    I won’t say anything except to point you to this editorial.

  • Taki

    Having done both of these things, atheism was worse, in that it was harder for them to understand the reasoning.

    Talking politics just leads to annoying debates I’d rather not participate in, so I’m actually more reluctant to bring up that topic.

  • Polly

    @HappyNat,

    Your wife doesn’t think Muslims can be loyal to America?

    Remember, a muslim as president. I think it’s just general suspicion that he’d favor Islam in the country – as the current prez. favors “faith” based programs.
    Also, there’s a pretty firm view in this country that Xian extremism represents the fringe, but Islamic extremism represents Muslims in general.

  • EKM

    Polly said,

    When I bring up those last 20 years in a xian church, my mother says, “have you heard what his rev. Wright said about America?”

    Has she heard what some white preachers have said about America? To a lot of people in this country, religion is just a “Get Out of Jail Free” card.

  • Darryl

    the Repub agenda is anti-Christian. Jesus said his followers should look after the poor, yet the Repub agenda is all about corporations. And he also thinks it is ironic that a lot of Christians have environmentalism, even though they think that they have a duty to preserve God’s creation, but instead support a party that pushes policies that favor corporations over people.

    No! It can’t be!!!

    I think Obama is secretly an atheist. No one can think outside the box like this, have this much tolerance and global thought, CARE about the future of our planet 9 a very non christian thing to do in my opinion) and believe in God. Thoughts?

    I think Mike C. would fit this description, but he’s no atheist.

    For all those who think Obama is such a dramatic departure from Bush,
    I won’t say anything except to point you to this editorial.

    Polly, there is no question that Obama is a dramatic departure from Bush, but that’s a separate issue from how in hell Barack is going to clean up the mess that we have made in the Middle East. He can’t do it (if he can do it) by himself. If the Congress and, more importantly, our people are not behind him, nothing will change.

    WARNING: Darryl is going to vent now. If you’re not into politics or unpleasant realities, then stop reading now.

    Every day I see decisions being made by our government that deflate my hope for a turn-around in the country. I think we’re at a place where we’re so far down this road that to turn around, if that’s even possible anymore, will involve great suffering. The fault is with us–as it always has been. In the face of rampant corruption, and apathy, and downright stupidity, I’m dubious about whether a enough Americans have those qualities necessary to preserve a Constitutional Republic.

    The pulpits of America ought to have enough talking points to last from now to Kingdom come by just naming the sins of our people, and the errors of our way, but where are they? They have become salesmen, like Joel Osteen, selling good feelings, telling us what we want to hear–that we’re good and we’re going to be okay.

    Where are the prophets? You know, those preachers that risk everything by naming names and crimes. The preachers we do hear about are decrying the teaching of evolution in our schools, or licking their lips over the prospect of filling the Supreme Court with judges who will overturn Roe vs. Wade, except–except for the Rev. Wrights who do point the finger at us, but not without discrediting themselves in the process. If we’re supposed to be such a religious nation, where in hell are the preachers? They’ve been bought off just like everybody else. Do we really expect the Ralph Reeds and Tony Perkins of this country to save us? What a joke.

    Where are the Dr. King’s when we need them? Where are the preachers that risk something for the truth, and have nothing to gain by it? Here’s another way that the conservatives are not Christian: Jesus stored up his wrath and his most piercing rhetoric for the hypocrites that paraded themselves as the eminently faithful. I hear more Jesus out of Bill Moyers and Amy Goodman than from the pulpits of the televangelists. Maybe there’s a few out there, somewhere, that just haven’t come to my attention. I suppose it’s up to them now, since government and the press have taken a walk.

    What irony it is that only preachers are expected to be truthful about sin, but the ones we hear from are usually stupid, and the rest are silent or unheard. The true preachers don’t come attired like priests. Like Bill Moyers, they are assumed to be partisan schemers, the Left’s answer to those morons on the far Right. What a sorry country we have become when it’s up to the myth-makers to save us, and even they are failing us!

    Kierkegaard is vindicated.

    We’ve made a mockery of our politics. We’ve nominated the less-qualified to be our President–AGAIN!. Why? Because it’s entertaining. It’s a horse race. What fun! And, because we’re cynical about politics. It’s only about power now.

    Nietzsche is vindicated.

    For all his qualities Obama has been a U.S. Senator for only 2 years. He only came to National attention 4 years ago. But, he seems to be the only choice for liberals. I am fucking astounded that McCain is even competitive in this election. Considering the state we’re in, how in hell does a Republican even have a prayer? I don’t fool myself–McCain could win in November. That’s how screwed up we are.

    Please forgive me, my people, but I have nothing but utter disgust for Americans now, which is to say “mea culpa.” Don’t get me wrong, I’m too much the optimist to lose hope; it’s just that my hope is not with America any more. We’ve failed. We’ve failed ourselves and the rest of the world. If we’re going to be saved, it will come from elsewhere, not here.

  • I like tea

    Have you read Thy Kingdom Come: How the Religious Right Distorts the Faith and Threatens America by Randall Balmer? He makes the case that the Repub agenda is anti-Christian.

    I didn’t say Republican policy was Christian in nature (any sane person can see it’s not), I said many fundamentalists consider acceptance of Republican principles as an essential facet of their religious worldview (which is another thing that any sane person who lives in America can see).

    A genuine crazy preacher

    Wright isn’t crazy, and everything he said about America is pretty much correct. Can you blame an older black man for having problems with this country? Criticizing one’s country out of a genuine desire to see it improve isn’t unpatriotic, and only nationalistic neocon assholes would say otherwise. It sickens me that the same group of people who loudly shout about supporting our troops question the loyalty of a former Marine just because they don’t like his opinions.

  • J Myers

    A friend’s girlfriend has a Lutheran minister for a father. When she mentioned that she was considering voting for Obama, he flipped out —apparently he thought that Obama coming into power was one of the signs of the apocalypse and that she was NOT allowed to vote for him.

    So this preacher is attempting to thwart God’s preordained plan? Who the fuck does he think he is?

  • SpursFan

    For all his qualities Obama has been a U.S. Senator for only 2 years.

    Darryl,

    Not that this takes away from your point (which I partially disagree with), but I’m pretty sure Obama was elected in 2004. Assuming he was took office in January of 2005, that makes him a Senator for 3 1/2 years. Sort of minor, but if we are to accept your greater propositions, the basic facts must be correct.

    FYI — Obama has three and a half more years in the Senate than our last two presidents did. They were only state executives before.

  • I like tea

    So this preacher is attempting to thwart God’s preordained plan? Who the fuck does he think he is?

    You can want the apocalypse to come all you want, but if you help it along, you’re an agent of Satan and bound for Hell.

    Or something.


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