Excellence in Education from a Christian Perspective

That’s the tag line for A Beka Book company (owned by Pensacola Christian College). They provide textbooks for fundamentalist Christian homeschooling parents.

They’re not too bad when it comes to Math (PDF):

The text presents a Scriptural view of working, tithing, saving, paying taxes, and budgeting time and money and gives a positive introduction to the American free-enterprise system.

I don’t even mind the English (PDF):

Selections from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe are presented, including the often-omitted record of Crusoe’s spiritual growth and his Christian witness to Friday.

It gets a little disturbing when they teach foreign languages (PDF):

The A Beka Book foreign language program is designed to give students the skill to speak, understand, read, and write basic Spanish or French in most every day situations, with a strong emphasis on witnessing for Christ.

At least the History books (PDF) are comprehensive, going all the way back to the beginning of time:

The text builds a solid foundation of ancient history, tracing man’s history back to the Garden of Eden…

And note the quotation marks below:

Since man’s actions are a product of his thoughts, the history of ideas is emphasized, rather than only political events and economic conditions. Students are given a Christian perspective on language, chronology, “prehistoric times,” art, music, revolutionism, evolutionism, socialism, Communism, humanism, liberalism, and much more.

Damn hippie “liberalism”…

Where I really get upset is with the Science books (PDF):

Like the other books in the series, Matter and Motion is written in the perspective of the founders of modern science: the belief that God is the Creator of the universe and the Originator of its order, reason, and reality; and that science is one way for man to control and master the physical world for the benefit of mankind…

Chapters on magnetism and electricity follow, and the text closes with a chapter on science versus the false philosophy of evolution.

Physics: The Foundational Science can play an important role in showing students the harmony between scientific knowledge and Christian belief. The text is firmly grounded on the view that we live in a God-created world governed by laws discoverable by reverent scientific inquiry. Issues of vital concern to Christians are handled in depth. Interspersed throughout the text are biographies of great physicists who were also Bible-believing Christians.

And Sex Ed isn’t any better:

The acceptance of immoral behavior by today’s society makes it
necessary to teach morality in sexual attitudes at an early age. Using Biblical terminology and examples, this book offers principles that will guide the young teen in setting dating standards. The author, Dr. Hugh Pyle, discusses the sins of adultery, fornication, and homosexuality as they are presented in the Bible and explains their results. The book details God’s plan concerning dating and marriage and the consequences of disobeying His moral commands in these areas….

I’m going to guess the “results” of homosexuality have little basis in science…

I’m not against homeschooling.

I’m not against parents teaching their children the morals they want them to learn.

I am against false information being presented to children as if it were fact. Which is what is happening in several instances here. It’s goes far beyond a re-interpretation (or re-writing) of historical events.

If Christian parents want to homeschool their children properly, why not opt instead for some textbooks that present accurate information, things that are true instead of things you wish were true?


[tags]atheist, atheism, Christianity[/tags]

  • Ron in Houston

    Hemant

    I’m glad you spoke in support of homeschooling. It does get a bad rap because a whole lot of people do it to mind control their kids. However, public schools are quickly becoming insane bureaucracies.

    I know you’re a teacher so I don’t want to say too much. I’ll just say this: my big gripe is with administrators.

  • Lauren

    I was homeschooled with A Beka Books. Since I’m an atheist now, I guess they didn’t take too well. ;) Actually, when I reenrolled in public school at age 12 they didn’t know what grade to put me in because I aced all my placement tests…which were for all the way through high school. Because of that, I have a hard time condemning A Beka Books’ academics. But that was over 10 years ago, so there could quite possibly be much more bullshit in the curriculum now. For example, I don’t remember any mention of homosexuality in my science or health books.

  • cipher

    If Christian parents want to homeschool their children properly, why not opt instead for some textbooks that present accurate information, things that are true instead of things you wish were true?

    Hemant, the problem is that they think the things the wish to be true, are true. One of the greatest jokes of our time is that the Christian fundies and the New Age morons are almost exactly the same, but for a few points of doctrine. Each side is rigidly married to its beliefs, defends them against all comers, and, when someone presents contradictory evidence, that person becomes the enemy and has to be gotten out of the way as quickly as possible before the entire edifice crumbles. But try pointing this out to a rep from either side; he/she will look at you like you have two heads.

    I really am quickly losing my tolerance for the “right” of parents to teach their kids whatever they want them to believe. I’m starting to think that people who have more than a handful of neurons to rub together need to go more heavily on the offensive.

    I wonder whether the section on Robinson Crusoe includes the part in which Crusoe admits that Friday has helped him to see God in a different light by espousing a belief in universal salvation?

  • http://agersomnia.blogspot.com Agersomnia

    Is there a way to sue this people for spreading lies to kids?

    I mean, they spread lies about what science is, and scientists should be able to sue them…

    But influencing kids in such a destructive way! they are cultivating psychosis on their every child! Total lack of contact with reality…

  • Gabriel

    A parent or guardian who would choose these books to homeshcool their child isn’t concerned with that child (children) learning about the real world. The idea is to keep the child away from reality and locked into a mindwashing, ultra-controlling parent centered world. I still remember the catalyst that started my own seperation from church. The preacher delivered a sermon on the evils of education. He actually told the congregation that it was probably sinful to send you children to college becuase they would be introduced to non-christian ideas and that educated people were less likely to attend church. That was it for me.

  • Aaron

    I suppose Dr. Pyle is glad his parents succumbed to the “sin” of fornication.

    What a “Hugh Pyle” of crap.

  • Ron in Houston

    Cipher said:

    I really am quickly losing my tolerance for the “right” of parents to teach their kids whatever they want them to believe. I’m starting to think that people who have more than a handful of neurons to rub together need to go more heavily on the offensive.

    I support what you’re saying. I felt the same with those kids from those crazy polygamist families. However, there aren’t really any alternatives. Right or wrong, you have the constitutional right to be a moron and indoctrinate your kids.

  • http://www.sharpiron.org Christian Beyer

    There is something obviously lacking in those text books. But I am not too concerned, because they aren’t found in public schools. But let’s be realistic for a second. Aside from math texts, how important are text books in elementary school? Or high school?

    I teach in a high school, not academics, but culinary arts. We I have an assigned text book with corresponding curriculum that I reference when writing my lesson plans. Outside of that, they never get opened. They are dull, boring and irrelevant. You don’t teach people to cook with books, contrary to what you see in Barnes and Nobles.

    Any good teacher only uses the text, if at all, as an occasional guide. The problem is that too many teachers are learning the curriculum along with their students, from the texts, and most of them are flawed (particularly the history books) in some fashion.

    I’ll bet most of the ‘educated’ people who are visitors to your site picked up most of what they know from other sources. The biggest problem I see today is not that people can’t read – it’s that they don’t read. Reading other books, better written and with more detail and from differing points of view than school text books is what educates those who are educated.

  • http://ohthethinksyoucanthink.blogspot.com Linda

    Hemant,

    I understand your concerns, and I agree with you for the most part. I do not believe in homeschooling for this very reason. The kids end up receiving only one perspective. They have very limited interaction with other kids whose parents many teach them something totally different.

    The educational system today has a whole gamut of problems, the way I see it, but it is what it is and that’s all we have for now. I don’t see it changing drastically anytime soon, as long as the same type of “administrators” (as Mike pointed out) are running the system. And they breed more of the same kind to take their place.

    I have a friend (a great teacher) who had to leave her job a few weeks ago because she let her kids be “too free in the classroom and were having too much fun.”

    Going back to the original subject matter… I don’t think we can get away from the parents teaching their own kids what they believe, nor is there anything wrong with that. I only see a problem when that’s the only perspective that the children learn.

    I try to let my kids get a variety of perspectives whenever possible. As they mature, they need to have the freedom to explore on their own. I am very passionate about what I believe. But to insist that’s the whole truth and the only right way to be would be a great disservice to my kids. I don’t want them to become who I am… I want them to be all that they are.

  • cipher

    Right or wrong, you have the constitutional right to be a moron and indoctrinate your kids.

    Ron,

    Yeah, I know. I just hate that it has to be this way, and I’m wondering whether or not it may be time to start pushing for an end to constitutional protections for stupidity – “I can believe whatever I want to believe”. I agree with the fundies on one point – this is a war, and, if they win, there goes everything. I can’t see any way in which we can survive, certainly as a civilization and probably as a species.

  • http://obimomkenobi.wordpress.com Obi-Mom Kenobi

    Thank you for the early comment about not being against homeschooling. Unfortunately, there are some real fundamentalist nutjobs teaching their children at home. That is true, most definitely. On the flip side of the argument though, I know many, many fundamentalist nutjobs who send their children to public schools who still successfully teach their children false and anti-scientific/anti-historic “information” about evolution, homosexuality, world history, and etc. Further, they push (successfully in some cases) to get the same such anti-science and anti-historic dogma incorporated into the public school system. Nor should we forget the nutjob religious fundamentalists who feel it is their calling to teach in the public school system and weasel their dis-information into their classroom lesson plans. Burning crosses on students’ arms, anyone? We are atheists. We homeschool our son.

    “I really am quickly losing my tolerance for the “right” of parents to teach their kids whatever they want them to believe. I’m starting to think that people who have more than a handful of neurons to rub together need to go more heavily on the offensive.”

    Cipher, sorry to have to disagree with you but I will always defend a parent’s right to teach their child what they believe to be true. Always. It is, in my opinion, the bedrock of American freedom. Beliefs can be overcome; they can change with time and new information. My husband grew up with a fundie BS family, even went to a fundie BS private school, and still saw the truth of scientific discovery once he left home. Homeschooling is a wonderful way to learn how to learn. Once you start a kid on the path of loving to learn, there’s nothing that isn’t possible.

  • EKM

    Christians should just stop using the word “education” and just say “indoctrination”.

  • Wes

    I was sent to a fundamentalist private school that use A Beka books. I hated them even when I was little. They feel the need to put a moralizing message in everything. In English class, for instance, we would parse out the grammar of paragraphs explaining why it’s sinful for men to grow their hair out long, or for women to dress in non-traditional fashions. Their whole curriculum is structured around inculcating conformity, religious indoctrination, and stifling critical thought. They’re a perfect example of how right wing ideologues see other people’s children as tools for promoting their agendas.

    As for the right for parents to indoctrinate their children, I support it up to a certain extent. But I think it’s important to note the irony in the fact that the “right to indoctrinate your children” is one of those unenumerated rights which the right wing hates so much (others would be such things as privacy and abortion). The constitution does not explicitly say that parents can teach their children anything they want. It’s actually much more explicit on separation of church and state (though the exact phrase does not appear), than it is on parental rights. And yet fundamentalists insist on the latter while denying the former.

  • Rose

    @Christian Beyer – This:

    …Too many teachers are learning the curriculum along with their students, from the texts…

    has replaced the whale in my nightmares.

    And I know this is totally juvenile, but since it’s still technically Saturday morning here:

    Dr. Hugh Pyle = Dr. Huge Pile of Sh*t.

  • cipher

    I think it’s important to note the irony in the fact that the “right to indoctrinate your children” is one of those unenumerated rights which the right wing hates so much (others would be such things as privacy and abortion).

    Yeah, this is what kills me. They would take away our right to teach our children naturalism, humanism, evolutionary theory etc. in a minute if they could. There’s always a double standard.

    On the one hand, protecting their rights also protects ours. On the other, it practically ensures global and societal collapse. We’re screwed.

  • cipher

    (This also validates my belief that nothing good can ever come out of Florida!)

  • Vincent

    Using Biblical terminology and examples, this book offers principles that will guide the young teen in setting dating standards.

    Biblical examples of sexual standards? Well let’s see, Lot was raped by his 2 daughters, Tobit married his first cousin, Moses was tricked into marrying the sister of the woman he wanted so he had to work extra and marry both of them at once. It just goes on and on.

  • cipher

    Moses was tricked into marrying the sister of the woman he wanted so he had to work extra and marry both of them at once.

    Jacob, actually.

  • LeAnn

    While I support the choice that parents have to homeschool their children, send them to private schools, or send them to the public schools in their local district, I have issue with the indoctrination that can take place using either of the two biggest Christian homeschool curriculums, ABeka and SonLight. As a history teacher (and Christian) I have major issues with both of these curriculums in their presentation of world history and American history. Both curriculums present non-Christian people and places in negative ways using terms like “savage” and one (I don’t remember which) even goes so far as to explain that the Trail of Tears was a good thing for the Native Americans and that it was to help them, etc. I mean, seriously?!?!?!? Who could even believe such a thing! If I were to choose to homeschool my child, I don’t think I could choose either of these curriculums unless I decided to supplement the material with other texts, novels, biographies, etc.

  • Ron in Houston

    Ciper said:

    “We’re screwed.”

    I don’t know if you intended that to be funny, but it did give me a laugh.

    I’m not so pessimistic. Besides Hemant can save us.

  • JohnB

    When I think about what kind of education I received in public schools, I have to wonder how much worse home-schooling can be. I know, I know…most parents home-school their kids to insulate them from ideas they find damaging to their faith, but there are exceptions.

    Luckily for me, I was a very curious and studious kid who spent most of his free time hanging out in libraries (school and otherwise), just soaking up as much about everything as I could get my hands on. School wasn’t fun for me, but learning was, and still is.

    I was also a very religious kid, until I learned that those opposed to evolution were Christians and others made uncomfortable by its implications. Christians, so loud in their espousing of “truth”, were actually offended by and bent on stifling the biggest truth I ever learned. It was a crushing disillusionment for that kid and he has been without religion ever since.

  • cipher

    I don’t know if you intended that to be funny, but it did give me a laugh.

    I’m not so pessimistic. Besides Hemant can save us.

    I’m actually deadly serious, but I don’t mind that you laughed!

    Hemant has enough on his plate…

  • Ron in Houston

    cipher

    I’m applying the George Carlin rule. I’m going to pray to Hemant because he seems like a guy who can get things done.

  • cipher

    I’m going to pray to Hemant because he seems like a guy who can get things done.

    We’ll have to dogmatize this thing, then. To start with – what are we going to use for a symbol? It will have to be something PZ can desecrate.

    Also, very important – how many natures does he have?

  • Justin

    I don’t know much about homeschooling, but I would guess that it is typically less effective at preparing kids for “the real world.” By that I mean preparing them for jobs, careers, etc. Am I correct? If that is the case, then the sort of textbooks mentioned in the article are not helping the younger generation. Since education is absolutely important for a nation’s prosperity, I believe that homeschooling should be highly regulated by the government. Allowed, but regulated. Although, I suppose that would defeat the purpose, no?

    PS. I have been reading this blog for some time now. Excellent work, Mr. Mehta.

  • Skylar

    I’d be really interested to see this sex ed book. “Biblical terminology”??? So everyone “knows” everyone??? As terrible as it is, I can’t help but find it hilarious.

  • Darryl

    (This also validates my belief that nothing good can ever come out of Florida!)

    Florida–second only to Texas (sorry, Ron).

  • Darryl

    Cipher, don’t get paranoid. We’re not screwed on this front yet. We’re in a shit hole at the moment, but we’ll probably dig out. Either way, life goes on.

  • Desert Son

    Presumably the health textbook has an extensive section devoted to keeping meals kosher? After all, we know the Judeo-Christian god has it in for shellfish and pork. Perhaps the civics and history texts should also include sections on civic duty so that children may be reminded not to speak ill of or defy their parents, lest they be put to death.

    Darryl, don’t give up on us Texans, and for that matter, Floridians, yet. I’ve lived all over this country, and no geographic location is spared regular issuance of both good and ill.

    No kings,

    Robert

  • Richard Wade

    On the one hand, protecting their rights also protects ours. On the other, it practically ensures global and societal collapse. We’re screwed.

    Cipher, I share your frustration but looking at the long term I am more optimistic. I’m glad that in spite of your anger you can see the fallacy of trying to force people to think or believe a certain way. Even if the enforced doctrine was one based on rational thought and scientific principles, the Belief Police would be a tyranny beyond imagining. Any such regime would be easily corrupted for the selfish interests of whoever was in power at the time. A choice between the “Rational Taliban” or the “Religious Taliban” would not be a choice we would ever want to make.

    I think fundamentalist homeschooling is in the long run self-defeating. While the best and brightest of those children such as Lauren, Wes and John B who have commented here today can eventually think their way out of the quagmire of willful ignorance, the majority of those kids will not be able to compete well in a society that is continuously more and more dependent on critical thinking and good, reliable science. Only a few intelligent ones will be able to rise to positions of power or influence while still retaining the most retrograde aspects of their indoctrination, for example Mike Huckabee, but they will face an increasingly steeper uphill battle. Meanwhile, their average and below average siblings will not be able to rise above a status allowed by a high school level education, if even that.

    Here is an example of the built-in handicaps they are being given:

    The text is firmly grounded on the view that we live in a God-created world governed by laws discoverable by reverent scientific inquiry.

    “Reverent scientific inquiry” (which sounds oxymoronic to me) basically means if the evidence unearthed conflicts with scriptural dogma, then it must be assumed to be false. The only thing to do with such evidence is to bury it again. I don’t think we’ll see many scientists or skillful critical thinkers coming from fundamentalist homeschools.

    I think those kids who are homeschooled in order to protect them from people who think differently will be socially handicapped as well. They will have been brought up to think that the best way to deal with diversity is to avoid it. So as adults they will continue to be insular, remaining in small communities of like-minded people. Even if they’re not physically isolated from the rest of society, they will only associate with their closely conforming friends, a kind of “Amish in the city.” This will limit their exposure to new ideas and innovative viewpoints, and even if they hear of them their first instinct will be to be suspicious rather than curious. The rest of the world will leave them behind.

    Those anti-intellectual and anti-science parents who homeschool their kids to preserve their backwardness face a daily embarrassment: The science that they try to dismiss whenever their fantasies are challenged is the same science that brings them their food, puts medicine into their sick kids veins and gives them all the technological gifts that make their lives longer, safer and more satisfying. By accepting all the gifts of science but not the responsibility they live lives of hypocrisy, and each generation of kids has more individuals who see through it.

    Much of this is sad for most of those kids in the short term but a good thing for the rest of civilization in the long term. I don’t think the Enlightenment can ever be turned around. With its brief and limited setbacks it is still inexorably growing.

  • cipher

    Richard, the problem I see with this scenario is that they won’t remain isolated, in cloistered communities. They’re gradually commandeering the political process. Every four years, they gain more ground. Huckabee took the South, essentially.

    There is also a growing body of evidence that fundamentalism has a neurological basis. If this is true – and I’ve suspected as much for years, long before it became a subject of research – they’re passing this trait onto their progeny. They’ll continue to bear children and to fan out across the country so that it will cease to be a localized phenomenon.

    The evangelical law schools – Liberty, Regent and one or two others – have for years been producing a corps of Christian activist lawyers. I understand that much socially regressive legislation is their doing. They’re determined to “reclaim this nation for Christ”, and they won’t stop until they’ve done so.

  • TheOtherOne

    Using Biblical terminology and examples, this book offers principles that will guide the young teen in setting dating standards.

    I hope they include Esther in those biblical examples. Lady entered a harem, got herself taught what she needed to know, tarted herself up, and . . . um, let’s just say *impressed* . . . the relevant royal enough to save her people. Lesson to be learned from this? Anyone? Unfortunately, they’ll probably say something like “extramarital sex isn’t the worst sin in the world, as long as it’s het” . . . . Assuming they don’t try to spin it as “the women were shown to him and he just fell in love with her inner beauty.”

  • Ron in Houston

    Cipher said:

    There is also a growing body of evidence that fundamentalism has a neurological basis. If this is true – and I’ve suspected as much for years, long before it became a subject of research – they’re passing this trait onto their progeny. They’ll continue to bear children and to fan out across the country so that it will cease to be a localized phenomenon.

    I agree, but it gives me some hope. Maybe we can medicate them out of their delusions.

  • http://ohthethinksyoucanthink.blogspot.com Linda

    There is also a growing body of evidence that fundamentalism has a neurological basis. If this is true – and I’ve suspected as much for years, long before it became a subject of research – they’re passing this trait onto their progeny.

    cipher,

    I don’t think that’s entirely true. Yes, I also agree that there is a link between fundamentalism and cognitive preferences, but to say that religious fundamentalism is genetically passed down is unfounded, in my opinion.

    The research indicates genetic predisposition to certain personality traits. Those traits are present in people within all different belief systems; not only the fundamental religious groups. As Richard pointed out, the “Rational Taliban” people would have similar traits as the “Religious Taliban” people. Different beliefs; similar traits.

  • cipher

    Linda,

    The article I sent you a couple of months ago presents evidence favoring a neurological basis for ideological preference. If further research bears this out – and I fully expect that it will – I think it’s reasonable to infer it’s a heritable trait.

  • Wes

    Cipher,

    Let’s not be too quick to conclude a genetic basis from a neurological basis. Always keep in mind that development and environment play a big role in the final shape of the phenotype. The genes aren’t so much an exact blueprint as a sort of set of rough guidelines, and phenotypic plasticity is always there.

    I have seen some studies which provide some provocative evidence of a neurological basis for certain fundamentalist and conservative tendencies (if I remember correctly, one recent study that I remember used an EEG to measure activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, which reacts to cognitive dissonance, and found that self identified conservatives has less activity in the ACC). So while it’s definitely not a closed case by any means, there’s at least enough evidence to take the neurological hypothesis seriously.

    But that does not prove it’s inherited. The results could be due to brain plasticity or some other phenomenon. Also, genetic predispositions will react differently to different environments. Or, the brain patterns could be the result of training or habituation. There are many ways that the neurological component of fundamentalism (if it exists) could be produced that aren’t necessarily genetic.

  • cipher

    Wes,

    Yes, I know. It’s one factor among many. Not conclusive, but enough evidence to warrant taking it seriously. Just something to take into consideration. I wasn’t trying to make a hard and fast point. My point was that fundamentalism appears to be self-perpetuating, and it’s here to stay.

  • http://ohthethinksyoucanthink.blogspot.com Linda

    Children raised in environments which consistently reward convergent reasoning and strict adherence but punish divergent reasoning, could conceivably grow into adults who are prone to getting stuck in various beliefs or ideologies. Might our current preoccupation with strict religious fundamentalism be creating obstacles to resolving the complex dilemmas we face in the world today? If we continue to insist that children around the world unfailingly adhere to the tenets of religious fundamentalism which promote intolerance, are we doomed to repeat the past simply because we have nurtured a world of thinkers who will not diverge from what they are told?

    Cipher,

    Above is a paragraph from the said article that you are referring to. And thank you again for sharing it. First of all, I don’t know that it’s at all conclusive that fundamentalism is genetically linked. And I don’t think you can single out the religious when discussing the subject of promoting intolerance.

    While the article addresses religious fundamentalism in particular, I believe we can apply it across the board to any belief system or ideology. The fundies do not have a monopoly on close-mindedness. We pass down all kinds of ideas and beliefs to our children in an attempt to make them think like us. If not consciously or purposely, they learn simply by watching and mimicking.

    I just wanted to point out that the hatred (or intolerance) for the religious is also an ideology that can influence and shape our children.

  • http://www.thegookins.net don

    I appreciate that Hemant stated right away that he is OK with homeschooling, and that the discussion here has been very civil. I am an atheist, and we are a secular homeschooling family, so I pretty much have several years of firsthand experience in this area. Hopefully I can clear up some misconceptions about homeschooling, and/or maybe reinforce some other perceptions.

    There is a very large contingent of homeschoolers who are fundamentalist Christians. However, there are also very many secular homeshcoolers, which includes both nontheists and some very mainstream religious folks who don’t believe that religion needs to be infused into everything. Secular homeschoolers tend not to get noticed as much because we blend in with the rest of y’all, whereas the fundie homeschoolers do tend to isolate and segregate themselves. They have all kinds of activities just for themselves (homeschool soccer, homeschool band, homeschool whatever), but my kids and other secular homeschooled kids do the same things as publicly schooled kids. My kids do Tae Kwon Do, soccer, dance, girl scouts, Cub Scouts, fencing, and baseball in regular community groups, and typically the other kids don’t even know they’re homeschooled. They have friends who are homeschooled and others who aren’t. My point here is that not all homeschoolers are denim-jumper wearing, lord-praising fundies; they’re just the most visible.

    As far as curriculum goes, oversight varies by state. Some states regulate heavily and others don’t. We do come across a lot of the A Beka and similar materials, and they kind of make me cringe. I can tell you that most homeschoolers, even the religious ones, don’t use a single source of curriculum. It’s usually pretty eclectic. Many people vary the curriculum within their family depending on each child’s learning style. Even the fundamentalists aren’t usually exposed only to their own worldview. Most homeschooled kids, religious or not, do end up prepared for college or the working world. The flip side of that is that there are a lot of kids going to public K-12 schools who still get the religious indoctrination outside of school and still believe it for the rest of their life. And after spending a year teaching an intro level college course a couple years ago, I can attest that there are a number of publicly-schooled kids who aren’t being adequately prepared academically.

    While I do think it’s unfortunate that kids are exposed to this kind of material, I have to support a parent’s ability to direct the education of their own children. Some of the things the fundies teach their kids scare me, but statements like this, from above, scare me more:

    I’m wondering whether or not it may be time to start pushing for an end to constitutional protections for stupidity – “I can believe whatever I want to believe”.

    Do we really want the government telling us what we can or can’t believe? I’d be willing to bet that atheism wouldn’t be on the approved list.

  • cipher

    Don,

    That is why I went on to say,

    On the one hand, protecting their rights also protects ours. On the other, it practically ensures global and societal collapse.

    In my view, it’s a lose-lose situation.

  • http://3thingsdaily.com ngl

    That’s the thing, though. these parents truly believe that this bollucks is 100% true. My parents certainly thought that. I was raised homeschooled on abeka books.

    I’m atheist now. Indoctrination doesn’t always work.

  • http://http://metroblog.blogspot.com Metro

    Re. the sex “ed” text …

    What are the Biblical terms for “contraception”, “erectile dysfunction”, and “anal sex?”

    How about “fisting”? “Blowjob”? “Rimming”?

    More importantly–where are those examples they spoke of? The Bible may be a much more interesting book than I heretofore believed!

  • Richard Wade

    What are the Biblical terms for “contraception”, “erectile dysfunction”, and “anal sex?”

    Well let’s see. I guess anal sex could be described as “sodomy” if you use the term, uh, loosely. Contraception could be expressed as say, “wasting seed.” As for erectile dysfunction, hmmm. Oh I know, “piety!”


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