Scenes from an Atheist De-Baptism Ceremony

How does one actually go about having an atheist de-baptism ceremony?

I attended one in Westerville, Ohio over the weekend and I can now tell you about all the ceremonial details.

It begins with some words from Acting President of American Atheists, Frank Zindler:

“Do you agree that the magical potency of today’s ceremony is exactly equal to the magical efficacy of ceremonial baptism with dihydrogen monoxide, and do you agree that the power of all magical ceremonies is nonexistent?”

Then, everyone responds with a booming, “Amen!”

There is no Baptismal pool here.

All that is needed is a blow dryer — in this case, the Blow Dryer of Reason — held by AA’s Legal Director Edwin Kagin:

dryer2.jpg

Then, the masses form a line to take part in this joyous occasion:

bapline2.jpg

One by one, they go underneath the Dryer…

bap2.jpg

And sometimes, the non-religious emotion overcomes you and you just fall (via jenigray2000):

falling.jpg

Some people just can’t get enough!

bapt2.jpg

Even President George W. Bush wants to get in on this action:

bush2.jpg

It’s not just for adults. This little girl can now see the light!

What do you get after you’ve gone through the whole process?

A nifty certificate.

This woman is positively thrilled:

cert2.jpg

What does that certificate say…?

certreal2.jpg

And no de-baptism service is complete without stopping by the de-communion table, which holds the holy A&W Root Beer and peanut butter and honey de-communion crackers.

communion2.jpg

This raises an interesting question… what happens if you desecrate an atheist communion wafer?!

One brave soul wants to find out and is surely seeking the wrath of the Catholic League’s Bill Donohue

His inbox is going to have *so* much crazy hate mail…

The media had a good time with this ceremony as well. Here’s a great article by Sarah Pulliam of The Columbus Dispatch.

Special thanks to event organizer (and good friend) Ashley Paramore for putting together a really kickass event.

  • http://jennifurret.deviantart.com/ Jennifurret

    This is a great idea! I think this would be really fun to do at Purdue. Is Ashley the person I should contact to see if she minds if we do it?

  • Brian E

    Completely awesome! I must get de-baptized!

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  • http://friendlyatheist.com Hemant Mehta

    This is a great idea! I think this would be really fun to do at Purdue. Is Ashley the person I should contact to see if she minds if we do it?

    Ashley will give you great advice on it, but it’s not a trademarked idea or anything :) You can just go ahead and do it!

  • http://feveredintellect.blogspot.com Viggo the Carpathian

    Am I the only one who finds this childish and intentionally antagonistic? This looks to me like the kind of thing I would expect of sophomore theatre majors trying to shock the establishment.

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  • Siamang

    Am I the only one who finds this childish and intentionally antagonistic?

    I have this really great solution when I think something someone else is doing is childish.

    I don’t participate. It works wonders.

    Viggo, if you want, YOU go organize a meeting of atheists that is mature and non-antagonistic. Give it all the trappings of a PROFESSIONAL theatre troupe attempting and succeeding at building a new norm for excellence.

    I’ll avoid attending that one as well. But please post it on the interwebs so that we can tell you how wrong your meeting is as well.

    (What a lot of panties in a bunch atheists we have around here. “No, no! You’re not doing ATHEISM right! Only I know the way to do atheism right!”)

    Feh. Let the people who want to have silly meetings have silly meetings. You have a better idea? YOU do what you think should be done.

  • KC

    This “ceremony” was HYSTERICAL! There is no “shocking the establishment” etc. There was no one there to antagonize, and the de-baptism was indoors at an atheist coming-out party. It was simply a mockery of religious rituals… and quite honestly one of the funniest things I’ve seen in awhile. I thought it was a great idea, and being baptized when I didn’t have a choice makes it even better to ‘remove’ it when I did have a choice…. but it only has as much symbolism as you choose to give it.

  • http://wolfpurplemoon.livejournal.com Amy

    I almost wish I’d been baptised so I could have a de-baptism!

  • Ron in Houston

    Viggo, I suppose you’re right, but then again the same thing could be said about things like Monty Python’s Life of Brian.

    To me, they were just having fun at their own meeting.

  • Miresse

    @ Amy – Ditto!

  • T

    I don’t believe in God, I place my faith in logic. But this is just silly. Even if it is just for fun, there are too many people who are making a non-belief system into a belief system. I don’t even like the term ‘Atheist’ as it implies that it is in fact a belief or method (-ist/-ism suffix).

    Doing this is just further diluting and is doing more harm than good. I agree with the other poster who said this would be seen as antagonistic.

  • Tim Van Haitsma

    I think this hilarious. I need to get myself a blowdryer of reason. Blowdryer of reason vs the blowhards of religion.

  • http://jadedconformist.blogspot.com erickg

    This is great. Thanks

  • anom

    I would be laughing the entire time. That is awesome.

  • http://ateosis.blogspot.com Barón d´Holbach
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  • http://myspace.com/jenigray2000 Jeni Gray

    Just for a little more context, either Edwin or Frank said at the beginning of the “ceremony” that many of us nonbelievers had been hurt by organized religion and that it’s important for us to be able to laugh about these things (I’m paraphrasing here.) He said his father was a Lutheran preacher and that he grew up in a very religious household. I was raised in a fundamentalist household and was baptized when I was 12. I felt like I was making fun of my own former beliefs, and it was very freeing and a lot of fun. There really was nothing negative or antagonistic about it, in my opinion.

    Great pictures, Hemant!

    Jeni (the girl in green :D)

  • http://berzeblog.blogspot.com dberze

    this is my peanut butter and honey cracker which is spread for you…this is my rootbeer, drink that shit up fools!

  • lo-rez

    This raises an interesting question… what happens if you desecrate an atheist communion wafer?!

    you get nasty looks for illogically wasting perfectly good peanut butter crackers.

  • ruben

    I respect your opinion, Im not a perfect religious, but i think that it can be exist someone special there, but i dont understand the reason for you laugh of the religious people with these acts.
    If you are atheist, ok, its all right , good for you¡¡, i dont laugh of you, please, you dont laugh of me.

    Not all the religious people are mad with their faith.Respect them.
    please.

  • Darryl

    What a lot of panties in a bunch atheists we have around here.

    Si, you’ve been a bit testy the last couple of days. Everything alright?

    This is a place for comments, and they should be welcomed not ridiculed. For some atheists this ceremony was a hoot, for some it was a useless mocking of things that some people take to heart. To point out the difference is not a waste of time or a sign of one’s delicates being bound up in hidden places. Have a beer or two then write me back.

    Cheers mate!

  • dub1

    This was COMPLETELY disrespectful . . . of people with peanut allergies!

    Agnosticism and atheism are the fastest growing belief systems: long overdue to come together and celebrate with a ceremony that one no longer believes in a book that says we should stone someone who wears wool and linen.

    Good for them, and great idea!

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  • http://cockingasnook.wordpress.com/ Nance Confer

    Yes, Amy. This is my problem. I was never dunked or sprinkled and now there is yet another ceremony I am not eligible to participate in!

    How will I get through the day? :)

    Nance

  • http://cockingasnook.wordpress.com/ Nance Confer

    I first read dub1′s comment to say that “antagonism is the fastest growing belief system” . . .

    Slow down, Nance, slow down.

    Nance

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  • kero

    LOL I think it’s funny. Dudes the very fact that people would spend time and effort to mock something others consider holy makes that thing being mocked seem all the more holy. I don’t see anyone mocking a hindu ceremony or an islamic ceremony but they choose a catholic one . . . interestingly ammusing. I think there may be something to this catholicism after all. I want to learn more about catholicism.

  • http://heathendad.blogspot.com/ HappyNat

    the very fact that people would spend time and effort to mock something others consider holy makes that thing being mocked seem all the more holy.

    Really? How does that work in your brain? So if they had mocked scientology you would suddenly believe in thetans?

    I don’t see anyone mocking a hindu ceremony or an islamic ceremony but they choose a catholic one

    Well it happened in Ohio where Christianity is the major religion and most of the attendees were raised with or around Christianity, so that would be the obvious target to mock. Also, almost all Christians practice baptism. The Catholics have cornered the market on a lot of crazy ideas but baptism isn’t one of them.

  • kero

    Also, almost all Christians practice baptism. The Catholics have cornered the market on a lot of crazy ideas but baptism isn’t one of them.

    The way the psuedo priest/pastor is dressed looks strnagely catholic . . . don’t you think :) Also communion wafer?? C’mon who are you kidding . . . it’s obvious which religion is being mocked there dude.

    So if they had mocked scientology you would suddenly believe in thetans?

    LOL I knew you’d bring scientology into this. No I was just making the point that every time an atheist wants to try to defame or mock a religious group they target catholicism. Scientology is rarely ever the focal point of these type of mockfests (if i may coin the term ;) ).

    Orthodox satanists (not to be confused with the Anton Lavey watered down version) also take part in similar ceremonies with a black pope, communion wafer etc. It’s interesting that atheists are beginning to look so much like satanists now. Keep up the good work and keep spreading that love guys :)

  • Andrew

    I don’t believe in God, I place my faith in logic. But this is just silly. Even if it is just for fun, there are too many people who are making a non-belief system into a belief system. I don’t even like the term ‘Atheist’ as it implies that it is in fact a belief or method (-ist/-ism suffix).

    Doing this is just further diluting and is doing more harm than good. I agree with the other poster who said this would be seen as antagonistic.

    Exactly. This is just creepy. Honestly, Hemant, you should know better. Your approach to atheism was very helpful to me in my transition, but this event too closley resembeles religious intolerance for my tastes.

    This is why I don’t go to meetings. I think it is important for atheists to stay connected, in one way or another, to protect their rights, but some folks take it too far. I honeslty have no right to judge these people on any other grounds than that they are indirectly giving me a bad name by doing things I find childish and ignorant.

  • http://cockingasnook.wordpress.com/ Nance Confer

    Some people just don’t recognize a joke when they see one. Like their funny bones have been damaged somehow.

    Nance

  • http://www.bernerbits.com Derek

    Some people just don’t recognize a joke when they see one. Like their funny bones have been damaged somehow.

    Still others recognize the joke and perceive it as a threat to their religious freedom. The level of threat is usually proportional to the actual hilarity of the joke.

  • http://heathendad.blogspot.com/ HappyNat

    The way the psuedo priest/pastor is dressed looks strnagely catholic . . . don’t you think Also communion wafer??

    Many Christian leaders all wear some silly robe thing, his brobe reminds me of what my Methodist pastor used to wear. If he just going after just Catholics don’t you think he’d have a collar? Also our communion bread looked a lot like a wafer.

    No I was just making the point that every time an atheist wants to try to defame or mock a religious group they target catholicism.

    Well that isn’t even close to what you stated in your first comment. Just because you see everything through your pope colored glasses doesn’t mean the rest of us do. I’m not sure your realize how similar Catholic and Pentecostals are in their beliefs, why would we only mock one group when we can include all Christians? You really aren’t that special . . .

  • Siamang

    Kero wrote:

    Scientology is rarely ever the focal point of these type of mockfests (if i may coin the term ;) ).

    Yeah, because THIS never happens.

  • Nick

    Though I wasn’t raised overly religious I was baptised. I find this whole ceremony rather amusing if not down right funny! I wouldn’t mind attending something like this. (Australia anyone???) There’s always seems to be a line drawn in the sand about whether making fun of religious belief is funny and about disrespecting other people. Does this mean we shouldn’t make fun of religion? Of course not. I precieve all religions to be nothing more than stories, superstitions and fairy tales, we make fun of that stuff all the time. Just because people take religion seriously doesn’t mean we should worry about making fun of something they believe in. What if you believed in religion at one point and laughing at it is your cure? Should you not do so? Religion doesn’t have feelings after all, it’s an institution. Mockery is by far the simplest of humour but it is by far the most freeing. I laugh at religion all the time, it helps me cope with the stupidity of it.

  • http://www.bigcynic.com Rich Hudson

    >>Am I the only one who finds this childish and
    >>intentionally antagonistic?

    Uh, I think the religious fanatics are out-antagonizing the reality-based community by a factor of, oh, a million, I’d say. The Christofascists are definitely winning the “death threat” competition, whereas one doesn’t hear of too many atheists issuing death threats. It’s the religious nutjobs who are the ones trying to bend reality to fit their fantasies by forcing their fairy tale-based rules on everyone else. The reality-based community is just saying, Leave religion out of public debate.

  • Phelyx

    Religious people really work that double standard, don’t they? They have always been completely free to ridicule and mock my beliefs by holding their made-up rituals that invoke a weird vengeful man in the sky who allegedly made all of reality in one week, just 6000 years ago. That kind of purposeful ignorance is a huge insult to my beliefs in science and evolution, etc… Rituals that perpetuate ignorance and distrust of scientific reality and rational thought are offensive to me. But we have freedom here, so you can conduct these rituals every week or as often as you want. You can televise them, and even get your own TV networks. You can use these weird beliefs to avoid taxes, create huge corporations and you can even start universities and exercise political influence. You can sometimes even get schools (of all places) to teach your impossible myths to children and call them truth. I’ll tolerate it if that’s really what you want to do. You’ll be insulting and mocking my beliefs but go right ahead. I won’t kill you, bomb you or burn down your house.

  • http://www.uaar.it Flavio

    In Italy, as you probably already know, we were able to have the privacy authority state that the catholic church must take note that someone isn’t part of the church anymore, on their own records. See this article on Wired and Uaar’s site (in Italian).
    I think similar procedures are available in Spain and other European countries.
    We actually try to stress the “civil rights” part of the thing, not so much the ridicule. I personally don’t mind the latter at all.

  • Rosemary Lyndall Wemm

    Please, please, tell me where I can be de-baptized like this.

  • Rosemary Lyndall Wemm

    Kero,

    You are being very Catholo-centic here.

    During my christian superstition-tainted years I attended baptism ceremonies conducted by Anglicans (both low and high church), Methodists, Presbyterians, the Greek Orthodox Church, the Russian Orthodox Church the Coptic Church, Pentacostalists, Baptists, but strangely enough, never a Catholic baptism (in spite of the fact that I attended weekly Catholic services during the 7 months I lived in Flores, Indonesia, where it is said that even the rocks are Catholic.)

    Perhaps that is why it never ocurred to me to see the atheist’s de-baptism ceremony as based on the practices of the Catholic Church. Only the last two mentioned churches on my attendee list consistently had ceremonies where the presiding official did not dress up in fancy garb and the bulk of them swung incense or crufixes or other iconic figures or implements.

    I’ve also attended, even participated, in ceremonies conducted by several other religions (Muslim, Hindu, Brahman) and although they do not practice baptism they, too, have elements similar to those of the general de-baptism ritual.

    Your comments remind me of the saying: If you only have a hammer everything looks like a nail. Or, if you only have knowledge of one church’s way of doing things then you think that hilarity debunking multiple church’s is aimed just at your personal set of beliefs.

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  • Moira

    While I did find the video to be funny, I also think its funny that Athiests find it necessary to gather and have pseudo-church…kinda self-defeating. Atheism has always been a bit funny to me because its as faith-based as the religious beliefs they enjoy mocking. Since science can neither prove nor disprove the existence of gods/god/whatever then holding an opinion to either side is inherently faith based. The logical statement should be “It is probable that no god exists” the faith based statement is “No god exists”.

  • http://boredbeyondbelief.wordpress.com Joe G.

    The young woman “slain in the Skepticism” was hilarious. I remember having similar experiences when I was a charismatic Christian. If only I could have been de-baptized and “slain” in the same way! Ha!

    For those you who find this offensive – remember that some of us spent years in religious practices and find this sort of silliness exactly what the funny-bone ordered!

    Flavio – grazie per il collegamento di Uaar. Interessante!

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  • Nin

    That kind of purposeful ignorance is a huge insult to my beliefs in science and evolution, etc

    Well your religion of atheism is even more insulting to the God that created the very things your all knowing scientists study and use to study to come up with their narrow minded (all finely tuned natural systems have come about purely by chance) views on the universe.

    I studied science (physics) up to university my conclusion is that there is a God. who created everything and he cannot be measured the way we humans like to measure each other and things. Many scientists of note believed in the existence of God. The more prominent ones wurely did like Isaac Newton and Einstein. LOL even Charles Darwin was quoted many time sas questioning his very own theory of evolution in the face of the intricacy and delicate balance in which life was maintained on earth.

    You guys can learn something from that :)

  • jerome

    Moira said:

    The logical statement should be “It is probable that no god exists” the faith based statement is “No god exists”.

    Bravo. I’ve been saying this for years. I can understand the agnostic standpoint but atheism is more illogical than any other religion I know. It stands only in opposition to the belief in the existence of God with no evidence to prove this. Therefore unlike other religious systems there is no forseeable goal in it since it cannot succeed in proving a god or gods non existence.

  • anton

    Why not dessecrate an islamic religious icon instead of a christian one for a change. Why all the effort focussed on christians when there are so many other religious groups out there?

  • Darryl

    Moira, atheism is no religion.

    Nin(ny), pay more attention to what gets written here and you’ll learn something.

    Jerome, you’re just plain wrong–see instructions above.

    Anton, because Christians pose the greatest problem here in the U.S.

    “Next!”

  • anton

    Rosemary said:

    I attended baptism ceremonies conducted by Anglicans (both low and high church), Methodists, Presbyterians, the Greek Orthodox Church, the Russian Orthodox Church the Coptic Church, Pentacostalists, Baptists, but strangely enough, never a Catholic baptism (in spite of the fact that I attended weekly Catholic services during the 7 months I lived in Flores, Indonesia, where it is said that even the rocks are Catholic.)

    Rosey did it ever occur to you that Anglicans, Russian and Greek Orthodox Churches along with the Ethiopian and several other churches are all Catholic? They may not be Roman Catholic but the ceremony of baptism has a great resemblance in all of them. The only real difference is that only the Roman Catholic Church recognizes the Pope as the head of the Church.

    The so called de-baptism ceremony mocks all of these not just the roman catholic. The point that I think Kero was trying to make was that atheists seem to be more anti-christian than they do disbelieve the existence of a god(s).

  • http://wolfpurplemoon.livejournal.com Amy

    Jerome and Moira, would you be agnostic over the existence of fairies, unicorns, father christmas and other such mythical/fictional characters? What about any of the thousands of gods worshipped over the whole of human history? If not, why is the abrahamic god a special case? There is no proof of any of these characters, except for mentions in human literature, in fact there is more tangible proof of the existence of father christmas or the tooth fairy than god, I actually had presents in my stocking on christmas morning and money under my pillow when I lost a tooth!

    Or you could both pick up a copy of The God Delusion and read what Richard Dawkins has to say on the subject and far more eloquently!

  • dpsych1

    Cant we all just have a little fun.

  • Rhonda

    I liked the idea of this rite of passage cerimony. Silly it may be to some and I suppose I think it is silly on the face of it. However, rites of passage are important for most of us. Who hasn’t celebrated one? I know I love to celebrate my birthday every year even though the candles are getting far to numerous to blow out. I suppose I created my own rite of passage from being a religious dupe to an enlightened rational adult. If you think carefully about it, those of us who have been deconverted from religion do go through something that passes us into the enlightened world, mostly it is done privately, but I like a public exhibition of it too, especially if it is kept light and humerous as this was among like-minded people. Great fun – no harm to anyone.

  • http://www.blackmesapress.com Donald R. Burleson

    How deliciously refreshing, air-blowing the baptism waters OFF with reason! There is hope for the world yet, with this kind of thing going on.

  • http://www.theacomplia.com Acomplia

    Lovely post. Please add my email address to your list and email me the updates if possible. I always like to read your blog and comment on it.

  • http://www.jamilahkolocotronis.com LKJ

    Why bother, even for fun?

    I was baptized as a Christian at 6 weeks. Later I became a non-Christian. I don’t need a farcical ceremony to banish my baptism.

    Oh well. To each his own.

  • http://www.jamesrobertsmith.net Bob Smith

    I’ve never believed in any god. So it would just be good fun for me to be de-baptized.

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  • Mriana

    All I got was swimmer’s ear when my mother had my Free Methodist great uncle baptize me in a river. How do you debaptize that? lol

  • Carol

    This is a non issue. I’m glad these people had a party. They did not target anyone, they did it in private. Each of them made something different of it, as all the commentators do.

    They need to get better eats though. The food should be very unlike communion. And seriously something yummy and wholesome!

    For those of you who feel your religion (or non-religion) was abused somehow, you need to ask yourself why you were offended by this? Isn’t your faith/non-faith yours and no one can take it away from you? If these folks were mocking and joking, so what? Look at them with interest and move on.

    Unless of course this threatens you…and it stirs up deep seated doubts you might have about your own belief system…Unless a crermony like this works its way into the faultlines of your consciousness and pries you apart from your faith (or non-faith)…

    You know, something like that…

    An atheist with doubts….hehehe

  • Billy

    Check out the exorcism video’s on a couple sites. Scary stuff, and too hard to watch.

    I should know. I had one removed when I was a child.

  • http://www.bruceburleson.org Bruce Burleson

    About 20 years ago I made the myopic decision to be baptized in a Pentecostal church. However since it’s been 15 years or so since I totally eschewed religion of all sorts, I’m long overdue for a De-Baptism! What a hilarious and excellent idea, and a poignant slap in the face to the idiocy that is organized religion.

  • Jeffry

    Athiests , are they like Goths?
    What a bunch of whiners.
    I know UFO’s are not real, but I don’t need to make myself feel better by telling people they aren’t around.

    Athiests are angry, that’s obvious.
    Why don’t they join in cults ( or an offshoot of some China club) who also don’t believe in God.
    Athiests never ever seem to mention a disbelief in the devil, why the free ride?
    To be honest, I find athiests to be bitch’n but don’t go past the door outside, because something very bad happened in their lives and figure God can’t exist if they had to suffer.

  • Siamang

    Jeffry,

    Are you just another angry whiney Christian?

    Jeeze, are you so insecure in your beliefs that you had to come here and post that?

    I didn’t go to some Christian site and start mouthing off. You came here. It’s clear you’re a little bit A-curious… if you know what I mean, wink wink!

  • Polly

    Jeffry,

    I hate “athiests”, too. They’re always up to no good, judging by how often Christians attack them.

    That’s why here at Friendly Atheist, we try to explain the many good reasons we have for not believing in god. Perhaps you can learn something if you listen.

  • claude

    If you want to go further in this direction, please read Daniel Quinn’s “THE STORY OF B ” It will air blow your brains !!
    After this, you are not even an atheist.

  • Frank Rizzo

    This was certainly hilarious. As I am just a man, I cannot speculate on the existence of God, or god(s), or God(s), or whatever.

    But I know pomp & circumstance when I see them. Aren’t they the reason people shun religion? Are we going to see atheists going around proselytizing and urging others to convert?

    If so, I expect to see a resurgence of religion, which is exactly what this world does not need.

    If you’re atheist, here’s an idea:

    Stand on your own two feet. Play cards with people, or go square dancing. Don’t let your personal philosophy become some kind of badge you wear.

    You’ll be no better than a Catholic or Jew if you do that.

    BTW, yes, I have a sense of humor. I just didn’t find this experiment funny in any sort of way. It insults traditional Christian religion without any sense of why it is doing so. Perhaps I’m being too critical.

    At least I’m not asking others to join me.

  • Jeffry

    You have something in your eye?

  • Jeffry

    I know you think I’m here to ruin the fun, but to be honest I want to get a pulse on what Iraqi’s are getting killed for. This is the kind of freedom America is dying for the Muslim world to have. Then by all means enlighten me.

    I grew up in Baptist churches. I knew many Sunday Christians that wore religion on their sleeves. But whatever man has to offer the world better be worth it, cause
    from what I understand there’s simply one hell of a price to pay for what is only seen as what would be a petty mistake.
    But, I know just that last sentence alone has no meaning to those who were born to be that way.

    Which is why being “born again” has no business being mentioned in these kinds of places, because I figure athiests are about as stubborn as American Christians thinking Jesus wants America’s TV evengelicals to have million dollar mansions.

    Not to try to score a point here, I often write to the Olsteens and Copelands and tell them hell is waiting for them.

    I have to say though, Athiests are great risk takers.

  • Siamang

    But I know pomp & circumstance when I see them. Aren’t they the reason people shun religion?

    I don’t know. You’d have to ask “people”. I’m a person. I don’t shun religion for it’s pomp and circumstance. I just don’t believe the supernatural claims of religions.

    You’ll be no better than a Catholic or Jew if you do that.

    I am no better than “a Catholic” or “a Jew”.

    Stand on your own two feet. Play cards with people, or go square dancing.

    Right. Because the people in this video never, EVER play cards.

  • Siamang

    Not to try to score a point here, I often write to the Olsteens and Copelands and tell them hell is waiting for them.

    Then you’re insane.

    Stop with the childish fantasy stories. Grow up.

  • MasterMind

    LOL I think it’s funny. Dudes the very fact that people would spend time and effort to mock something others consider holy makes that thing being mocked seem all the more holy. I don’t see anyone mocking a hindu ceremony or an islamic ceremony but they choose a catholic one . . . interestingly ammusing. I think there may be something to this catholicism after all. I want to learn more about catholicism.

    There’s nothing to mock with Hindu’s, they go on their way; mock the Islams, you get blowed up. Scientologists, eh, who cares? They’re not big enough to mock. I would mention the jews, but saying that word is suddenly taboo.

    But Christians, they’re big, they’re based in America where you can’t kill masses without SOME consequences, they blindly attack others (at times) and they’re faith is the most, ah, ridiculous.

    There’s an art to ridiculing others. I suggest you learn it.

    ; P

  • max

    thank you so much for making atheists look like bumbling assholes that are just trying to elbow the ribs of mainstream religions. I really appreciate being portrayed as some dumbfuck with a terrible sense of humour. Can I just be an atheist without worrying about other peoples’ beliefs?

  • jen

    I think the guy with the monkey face is the one who needs to evolve

  • vdb

    the question is not: “do you believe in god?”
    it is: “does god believe in you?”

  • http://illuminist.org Dennis from Oregon

    How can you conclude a de baptism, done in the name of reason, and conclude it in the name of the diefied Sun?? (Amen)

    As Christains you were duped into worshipping the Sun all along. You went to Church on Sunday, the day of the Sun, to worship in a building with a giant penis on the top, a morphing a the penis that adorned the Mithraedic Sun temples of old.

    Then you said prayers from the book that in Latin is biblios helios. You were told this means “Holy Bible, yet the correct translation of course is “Book of the Sun”.

    Then you conluded your prayers to the “Son of God” with Amen, the name of the diefied Sun..

    So its a valid question…

    Congratulations on you first step to throw off superstition and religious dogma..

    At Illuminist.org we have a forum, http:/dennisfromoregon.com/forum that is dedicated to exploring this topic, as well as all topics, from a free from dogma perspective.

    You have my personal invitation to explore and meet like minded people..

  • Mark Farris

    All you Christians only know the bits and pieces of insanity you have been spoon fed as children. I know there is no god because the bible tells me so. Isaiah 43:10 reveals the ignorant, misogynist, hate filled men who wrote the bad book did not comprehend infinity.

    As Christianity continues to falter here in the US it grows in the third world where science is not exactly a priority. All the while Christianity expands on that thin ice, the waters of critical thought are warming up here in the land of milk and honey. All you Christians have is that same old sad ass guilt trip you have to continually push. You give away guilt, fear and sorrow only so you can sell salvation. You are hucksters.

    Your fairytale is exposed at every step as science continues to advance. Paleontology is digging up transitional fossiles left and right, archeology has already dug farther down than the Jewish folk tales can account for, the Hubble telescope has given us a glimpse back in time farther than any religion has suggested! Grow up.

    No doubt the barn used for the de-baptism will not be big enough for the crowd next year. The fastest growing ideology today is based on reason, not insanity. Any of you Christians want to talk about love in the bad book, I can turn a page or two and show you hatred and ignorance. You are confused.

  • Jessi

    I stumbled across a link to this site, and for all of you who are saying this is making fun of Catholics alone, I have to say that you are very wrong. As some others have said, many Christian sects have a priest or pastor who dresses up in a robe. I was raised Pentecostal, which I truly see to be the most oppressive of all forms of Christianity. While the pastor didn’t dress up, we took communion, we had baptisms, and we even had anointment with oil. This doesn’t even cover talking in tongues…which scared the crap out of me when I was a kid.
    I can completely understand the need for a support system for atheists (what some of you are calling a “church”). While rituals may seem silly to some, they are a good way to acknowledge things, bring them to light, and let them go.
    I really wouldn’t mind participating in a ritual like this to “cleanse” myself of all the guilt and confusion that religion put on me over the years. Rituals don’t have to be religious. They are only symbolic…a way of officially doing something…like graduations, weddings, birthday parties, ribbon cutting ceremonies…etc. Why not have a ritual to free yourself of religion? I see absolutely nothing wrong with it.

  • Chris

    This is a great way for people to blow off some steam. We have to tolerate so much foolishness from “believers” each day–we need to be able to act silly and get the frustration out of our systems.

  • Rozmarija Grauds

    C.mon Jeffry and all, the only thing atheists want is SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE. We don’t care how many churches are built, and let them be tax exempt, it’s just that nothing in Legislature should be based on writings in the Bible, or Koran, or any ancient book attempting to diagnose sociobiology and “explain” natural phenomena lacking data. If we fail to speak up, we’ll all be living in a fascist theocracy, and you won’t like that!

  • Sonic Nurse

    To each their own.

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