Carnivore vs. Christian

Question for you vegetarian atheists out there:

Who would you be more likely to date: Someone who was religious or someone who ate meat?

Does one matter more than the other?

Are there varying degrees of religiosity or vegetarianism that you would condone?

Personally, I find myself to be *much* more passionate about atheism than I am about my vegetarianism.

However, while I could see myself dating a somewhat religious girl, I think her eating meat would be a dealbreaker.

(via Friendly Atheist Forums)

  • David D.G.

    Speaking as one who accepts evolution, I didn’t claw my way to the top of the food chain to eat vegetables.

    ;^D

    ~David D.G.

  • DeamonCohln

    Any female Christians who eat meat may report to me then.

    mmmm….corruption

  • Carlos

    I didn’t know you were vegetarian, Hemant. Perhaps you could do a blog post about it, explaining how you came to be so.

    Or have you already done that?

  • http://friendlyatheist.com Hemant Mehta

    I didn’t know you were vegetarian, Hemant. Perhaps you could do a blog post about it, explaining how you came to be so.

    Or have you already done that?

    There’s not much of a story to it… I was raised in a religion (Jainism) that advocated vegetarianism. When I became an atheist, it still made sense to me that it’s wrong to kill animals, so I remained a vegetarian. That’s about it!

  • http://atheistagogo.wordpress.com/ Gregory

    Hmmm…

    On the religious front, it simply depends on what kind of “religious” we’re talking about. Simplistic beliefs are likely to turn me off; more nuanced, searching ideas of spirituality are less likely to do so.

    On the meat-eating front, the only folks that bug me are the ones folks who get angry and defensive at the mere idea of the existence of vegetarians, or that proudly proclaim their complete inability to eat a meal without meat. Complete ignorance about vegetarianism is also a turn-off.

  • L

    As a girl who is both, I have to agree, I am more passionate about my atheism than I am my vegetarianism. While I see vegetarianism a considerate diet to abide by, I can understand why not everyone would choose to follow it (so far as health reasons, physical activity needs, and distaste for vegetarian food goes.) However, I can not understand why anyone would feel the need to believe in an imaginary friend at such a mature stage of their life. To me, atheism seems more of a sign of independence, where vegetarianism is a step further, and not necessarily a required (though preferred) one. I can respect someone who chooses not to participate in something they don’t see the direct result of. I can’t respect someone who is ignorant.

    (Spirituality, on the other hand, is a completely different topic from organized religion.)

  • http://www.purduenontheists.com Jennifurret

    I didn’t know you were a vegetarian either. There go my chances… <3 delicious, delicious meat

  • Becky

    I’m a vegetarian engaged to an atheist who eats meat. :D I’m perfectly happy with this situation.

  • Annie

    Well put, Gregory.

    As a vegan married to a non-vegetarian, religion is my deal breaker. However, since I do most of the cooking, I only have to see meat on his plate when we dine out.

    Carnists and zealots are both out for me.

  • http://spgreenlaw.wordpress.com/ spgreenlaw

    I’d say I’d be equally unlikely to date an omnivore or a religious person, though it’s hardly a black or white issue. I could date someone who is only vaguely religious in a light spiritual or deistic way, and I could see myself dating someone who made an effort to cut most meat out of their diet, or who only consumed free range, “humanely” slaughtered meat.

    The way I see it, both religion and poor ethical choices (like causing unnecessary pain) are both intellectual failings. Generally when one thinks about it long enough and has enough valid information, one will find themselves more likely to be godless and vegetarian/vegan.

    Edited to add: This isn’t to say that I think omnivores are stupid or cruel. One mistake does not erase the rest of a person’s admirable qualities, and nobody is perfect.

  • Ubi Dubius

    My first requirement for any woman I date is that she can keep a secret from my wife. Haven’t found one yet.

  • http://terahertzatheist.ca Ian

    I think an issue for me might be a vegan girlfriend. Being a poor student it can be difficult to work around a diet that consists of oftentimes expensive organic restaurants.

  • Adrian

    I’ve been vegetarian for a little over 10 years and I would much, much rather be with a meat-eater than a Christian. Veg is sort of a lifestyle choice (you know, one of those actual lifestyle choices) and it doesn’t reveal that much about a person. If the girl were a thinking, rational, intelligent, sceptical person then what trauma did she suffer to be a Christian, and if she’s not thinking, rational, intelligent and sceptical we probably won’t get along too well :)

  • patientia

    I’m a vegan atheist in a relationship with a meat-eater agnostic (more likely apatheist). He’s eating less meat than when we met (due to my cooking), but didn’t become vegetarian (yet). We live in a country where most people believe that “a meal without meat is not a meal”, so we have poor vegan food choice in stores. He sais he’ll become vegetarian when there’s enough cheap tasty vegan replacements for what he eats (mock meat, mock cheese etc.). He respects my veganism and checks ingredients of products I buy (in case I missed something).

    I used to be in a long-term relationship with a Christian, but he wasn’t passionate about religion, he almost never went to church, I never saw him praying… He was a meat-eater, but didn’t eat much meat, and I became a vegetarian while in that relationship. I think neither bothered me much. It’s all about intensity of somebody’s religiosity or meat-eating.

  • Cathy

    I’m not a vegetarian and I have no problem with vegetarians or vegans, but is veganism really based on complete rationality (“Generally when one thinks about it long enough and has enough valid information, one will find themselves more likely to be godless and vegetarian/vegan.”)? After all, pure veganism eventually will lead to a vitamin B12 deficiency without supliments. And, I could see how killing a cow would reasonably be considered harm, but it is not overly difficult to milk a cow (goat, sheep, whatever you like) and not cause it pain or deprive the offspring of milk (most animals will make surplus milk if milked regularly). So, would the issue be with the commercial “factory farm” style practices? But if that were the case, wouldn’t buying humanely produced milk be morally okay?

  • Amanda

    I am a vegetarian atheist with a Christian meat-eating husband. He’s also a republican and I’m a democrat. Makes life interesting – there’s lots to talk about! And it helps that we’re both flexible, middle of the road types. If he expected me to cook meat for him that would be a deal-breaker. He cooks his own. I also would not have married a hunter. His views on that topic are the same as mine – i.e. “What the hell is wrong with those people?!”

    Amanda

  • http://themousesnest.blogspot.com Mouse

    When my wife and I first met, I was vegetarian and she was not. I did most of the cooking and she added whatever meat she wanted. I’m back to eating meat since early in my first pregnancy and have not gone back to vegetarianism due to a variety of reasons, health and otherwise. It’s still something I will hopefully get back to once I’m done having kids. It gives my mother-in-law conniptions in trying to figure out what to feed me, but it’s a relatively minor issue.

    Religion would have been a deal-breaker. Especially once kids entered the picture. I know there are people who say they do this, but I don’t think I would ever be comfortable with a situation where my kid received even a partial upbringing in a strongly religious setting. (Our son is getting a Dale-McGowan-style grounding in religious literacy, so that he’ll have understanding without indoctrination.)

  • http://complexzeta.wordpress.com Simon

    I wouldn’t consider dating an omnivore, and it’s unlikely I’d date a non-vegan. If we couldn’t share food, that would defeat a large part of the purpose of the relationship for me.

    A theist could be okay. At least it would be something to discuss.

  • Amanda

    Religion would have been a deal-breaker. Especially once kids entered the picture.

    I hear what you’re saying there. We have two kids and it can be a challenge. And with our oldest turning 4 I’ve really only reached the tip of that iceberg. Living in the deep south doesn’t help on that front either – ugh. I am really glad that my in-laws are far away, that helps. I would say that a hard-core, wants to convert everyone type religous belief would be a deal breaker for me to. We are able to manage our different beliefs while raising children though. If my oldest asks a question about death, for example, I can give my answer, but then also suggest that she ask her dad and get his opinion too. I am bale to respect his religious views because I don’t find any to be too crazy.

  • Adrian

    Cathy,

    I’m not a vegetarian and I have no problem with vegetarians or vegans, but is veganism really based on complete rationality

    It may be an ethical decision and like all ethical decisions, it is informed by reason and evidence but not based on it.

    There are also environmental and health reasons which yes, do lead one to vegetarianism after an impartial evaluation of evidence. We effect the world through our purchases and food is one of the biggest hidden purchases we all make.

    After all, pure veganism eventually will lead to a vitamin B12 deficiency without supliments.

    Everyone needs to watch their diets to ensure the proper vitamins and nutrients, vegetarians are no different. Just as we need to make sure we eat fruit and vegetables to prevent scurvy, strict vegans can take fortified cereals or vitamins. It really isn’t a problem.

    So, would the issue be with the commercial “factory farm” style practices? But if that were the case, wouldn’t buying humanely produced milk be morally okay?

    I think that if meat consumption was cut back to the point where milk was a big issue then the goals of many vegetarians would be met.

  • Shane

    “I also would not have married a hunter.”

    Hunting is an important ecological activity that controls populations of many different animals. I live in the Canadian prairies and it is common and necessary here to control the population of animals that have been displaced by farmer growing massive quantities of food for urban vegetarians.

    To invert your original question and answer it (I am not a vegetarian) the answer would really be to quantize the crazy of the other person (since I am not a vegetarian, I obviously regard vegetarianism as irrational but this is not the time or place for THAT discussion). And you go get vegetarian/vegan crazies all the way up to the terrorist bomber stage. All in all though I think vegetarianism is probably strongly skewed to the harmless side of that scale–much more so than religion. But I can see the very real possibility of preferring a nominally or apathetically religious person to a zealous vegan.

    But I did grow up on a small mixed farm and would like to own one myself eventually and raise a small amount of livestock. Ideally I would like to marry someone with a similar background who is going to be helpful when it comes time to butcher the chickens ;-)…

  • Richard Wade

    Who would you be more likely to date: Someone who was religious or someone who tied their shoes with the knot at the bottom of the lace holes rather than at the top?

    Does one matter more than the other?

    Are there varying degrees of religiosity or eccentric shoe tying that you would condone?

    Personally, I find myself to be *much* more passionate about atheism than I am about shoe fastening techniques.

    However, while I could see myself dating a somewhat religious girl, I think her wearing shoes with the knot at the bottom would be a dealbreaker.

  • Shane

    There are also environmental and health reasons which yes, do lead one to vegetarianism after an impartial evaluation of evidence.

    I highly doubt that. The environmental part to an extent but even more so the health aspects. But I am not about to get into a flamewar about vegetarianism here. For one thing I am probably grievously outnumbered…

  • Adrian

    Shane,

    The environmental part to an extent but even more so the health aspects.

    I notice you described farmers as providing for “urban vegetarians” even though over 90% of crops go to feed livestock. That combined with this comment makes me think that even a small time spent reading up on these issues could provide a lot of, ahem, food for thought.

    We may honestly differ about questions about morality (I certainly differ from many other vegetarians), but the facts are pretty clear and aren’t matters of opinion.

    I’m not really interested in a prolonged debate, but if you’re interested I could try to find some reference articles so we could at least share a familiarity with the evidence.

  • Aj

    Amanda,

    I also would not have married a hunter. His views on that topic are the same as mine – i.e. “What the hell is wrong with those people?!”

    Answer: Hundreds of thousands of years of adaptation, and thousands of years of culture.

    Simon,

    If we couldn’t share food, that would defeat a large part of the purpose of the relationship for me.

    Consolidation of food resource for economy and convenience? And they say romance is dead…

  • Jen

    I am a vegetarian, and I have yet to date another. I would love it, because I loathe to cook, and therefore I need someone who can cook vegetarian food for me (I will do the laundry and also be pretty). Of course, I haven’t ever dated an atheist (does a lazy deist count?). If I end up in some long term monogamous partnership, I am not cooking meat for anyone, end of story.

  • http://spgreenlaw.wordpress.com/ spgreenlaw

    Cathy,

    I would agree that if one got milk from a legitimately non-cruel source, there would be nothing morally wrong with it, though some vegans will disagree and claim that any sort of animal captivity for human purposes is cruel.

    I wouldn’t honestly even know where to find milk that was produced locally (I try to be environmentally friendly) and humanely, however. Even if the dairy cows are treated well, for example, their offspring are often sold for veal or raised for the slaughter.

    (Also, I’m still in transition to veganism. There are quite a few economic barriers in my way, so I am far from innocent as far as this sort of thing goes.)

  • JohnB

    I have no problem with vegetarians or vegans whatsoever and there are valid and legitimate reasons for being either.

    Having said that, we need to understand that man (and by man I also mean woman) is essentially a hunter and to understand that we need to heed the words of Sherwood Washburn and Jane Lancaster, who said: “In a very real sense our intellect, interests, emotions and basic social life–all are products of the success of the hunting adaptation.” Being a responsible meat-eater is no more wrong for us than it is in any other predator.

    Now, whether the lady I was dating was religious or not wouldn’t be as important as what she thought of my being an atheist. If that is acceptable to her, then her religiosity probably wouldn’t get in the way of our getting along at all.

  • http://inthenuts.blogspot.com King Aardvark

    I married a Christian girl but I wouldn’t even consider dating a vegatarian. My wife loves meat even more than I do.

    MMmmmmmmm, meat. [drool]

  • http://complexzeta.wordpress.com Simon

    Aj,

    Consolidation of food resource for economy and convenience? And they say romance is dead…

    Oh come on. It’s not for economy of convenience. (The way I like to cook and eat, it would be no more economical or convenient to make food for two than it would be to make food for one.) I do, however, really enjoy cooking with other people. But I don’t enjoy watching someone else cook meat/dairy/eggs at all or contributing to it.

    And to all the omnivores who post about why you aren’t vegetarians, note that you weren’t asked, and I imagine I speak for most vegetarians/vegan in saying that we don’t care. Most of us have heard all the reasons you give before, so you’re giving us no new information. It’s just annoying. I consider you to be just as bad as the Christians who troll on atheist blogs.

  • http://journals.aol.ca/plittle/AuroraWalkingVacation/ Paul

    It’s really a matter of degree, isn’t it? If you can’t sit at a table with me while I eat my steak without making a comment, we’re gonna have a problem. If you’re happy to eat and let eat, we’re gonna be OK.

    Likewise, if a religious person can spend a couple of hours with me without trying to save my soul, things are going to be just fine. Cause, really, I don’t feel any need to convince her that her soul doesn’t exist. It’s irrelevent to our daily lives.

  • http://www.banalleakage.com martymankins

    Give me the girl who eats a nice big steak. Religion just gets in the way and isn’t as filling.

  • http://ecstathy.blogspot.com efrique

    I am both atheist and vegetarian.

    I was not raised as a vegetarian (though I guess you would have been, since you were raised in Jainism), becoming vegetarian as an adult (though I knew as a teenager that I would eventually do so). I look on becoming vegetarian as something that people come to, a journey they must make. If people ask about my vegetarianism I try to explain why I think it’s important, but on the other hand I try not to judge them harshly.

    My atheist partner is non-vegetarian (my kids are also not vegetarians – I want them to be old enough to work it out for themselves before I would seriously encourage them).

    If I was dating, I would be able to tolerate both meat eating and religiousness – but I’d expect a certain amount of respect, tolerance and understanding in return. If that was absent, the date would probably be very short.

    I’ve usually found tolerance much easier to get for my vegetarianism (but then again, it’s almost impossible to disguise being a vegetarian when you eat with people, so you’re forced to be out of the closet with it).

    Most meat eaters can at least comprehend vegetarianism and don’t demonize it as a matter of course, even if they don’t agree with it – not so with many fundies however, who generally seem utterly incapable of comprehending difference from themselves, and simply demonize any difference reflexively.

    While most religious people aren’t that fundamentalist, the knee-jerk anti-atheist sentiment can come even from people who aren’t particularly religious, while kneee-jerk anti-vegetarian sentiment is much less common.

  • http://www.youtube.com/user/ElusiveAnole Matt

    Someone’s diet is really of no concern to me. As long as he’s not forcing me to make too many sacrifices, I’d think we’d get along fine. I wouldn’t mind changing my diet to a degree either, but nothing drastic like uber-veganism.
    I think I could date a religious person too. I think that aspect really depends on the sect or ideology they come from though. I’d totally go for a Buddhist/Wiccan/Hindu/Jain/Pagan/Spiritualist/etc. or a liberal minded member of the Abrahamic faiths. It’s when we get into the wacky, deluded Creationists, flat Earth’ers and Ray Comfort that I become uncomfortable. Then again, when thinking about Evangelicals or conservative Christianity in general, I tend to cringe.

  • Heathen Hominoid

    My atheism is a very basic, fundamental part of who I am and how I look at the world. While it’s not ALL of who I am, it is the starting point from which I approach life. I could never be in a fulfilling relationship with someone who does not share that worldview. Vegetarianism, while very important to me, is not a dealbreaker. There are many reasons I came to be vegetarian and I would never expect someone else to come to the same decision lightly or quickly. Not eating meat does not make you an ‘ethical’ person and there are many other ways to live an ‘ethical’ life. Open-mindedness, mutual understanding and good communication are much more important to me than diet.

  • TheDeadEye

    I couldn’t fall in love with someone whom I didn’t intellectually respect, so that pretty much rules out all fundies and “true” Christians.

  • Aj

    Simon,

    Oh come on.

    You thought I was being serious? Oh, come on. Nice of you to give an explanation though, makes sense. It’s strange, I was thinking perhaps something sexual.

    Jen,

    I would love it, because I loathe to cook, and therefore I need someone who can cook vegetarian food for me (I will do the laundry and also be pretty).

    I’m not a vegetarian but only cook vegetarian meals for myself. I can’t cook, cooking vegetarian food is really easy. I really like stir-fry vegetables with couscous, vegetable omelettes, and vegetable lasagne. They don’t take any skill, you can use the vegetables you like, and they don’t take hardly any time at all.

  • http://generalsystemsvehicle.blogspot.com mandrellian

    Hemant,

    What if you dated a hot Catholic vegan who ate crackers that magicked into god-flesh upon contact with human saliva?

    I’m married to an almost-vegan (fish & seafood are her only concessions) – she’s a reformed omnivore and avoids animal products for health reasons (lactose intolerance being one) more than ethical concerns. Mrs M isn’t judgemental about it though and has no problem cooking meat for me (but she does insist I don’t kiss her with my “evil meat breath”). Basically, it’s not an issue as long as there’s no “contamination”. Fine with me because I love both seafood paella and soy lattes.

    But, with us both being heathen science nerds and utterly intolerant of faith-based foolishness, if she suddenly decided to lose her freaking mind become born again, well … let’s just say a re-evaluation of the relationship would be required.

  • Cait

    I’m a vegetarian atheist and I would much rather date a meat eater than a religious person… most meat eaters that I know just eat meat because it’s something they’re used to eating, and they don’t think about it much (so it’s not like they’ve dedicated their life to something that I dislike, and maybe there’s potential for them to eat less or no meat in the future). Religious people, on the other hand, have a tendency to dedicate their life or large portions of it to their religion, and that’s just too much for me to deal with in a relationship.

  • http://veganrepresent.com Dan D Lion

    Woah! Vegan atheist here and that is a tough one to answer!

    Lemme try to tease this one out.

    Eating animals is a direct contribution to suffering while religion is less so. Also meals are often the center of important rituals in a relationship. The cognitive dissonance there might eventually sink the relationship.

    OTOH if somebody was doing bible study group all up in my video i’d prolly end up eating one of THEM!

    Hmm, how cute is this person anywho? ;)
    I gotta sleep on this one.

  • David Wegehaupt

    As a vegan and an atheist, I think I could tolerate a reasonable theist over a non-vegan. Although I can’t see myself in either situation…

    I briefly read through some of the answers and saw someone ask if veganism is based on ‘complete rationality.’ I don’t know exactly what you mean by this, but it is definitely an ethically consistent decision. If one accepts that non-human sentient beings are not ours to exploit for our own trivial wants, then it is necessary to adopt a vegan lifestyle. There are plenty of good books giving a philosophical defense/explanation of veganism. The Case for Animal Rights by Tom Regan is a good place to start, or Rain Without Thunder by Gary Francione… and lots more.

    Vegan and vegetarian diets are also perfectly capable of providing one with all essential elements of a healthy diet. There is no real controversy of this. B12 does exist in non-meat places, and there are plenty of supplements available.

    Anyways… I’d say that my belief in inherent rights of animals to not be subjected to unnecessary suffering supercedes my non-belief in a higher power…

  • patientia

    My boyfriend uses mouthwash or chewing gum if he ate meat and wants to kiss me, but I do the same if I ate something he can’t stand, like aubergines.

  • Mark N

    Flipping this around, as a carnivore who loves to cook, I’d find it harder to date a vegetarian than a christian – the former is *bound* to have an impact on my life; the latter may not.

    That said, I’d probably be unlikely to get into a situation where I’d be dating Christians – especially the sort I’d find it hard to spend time with, as it’s generally pretty obvious on first meeting that someone’s a relgious nut; vegetarianism isn’t so obvious unless you happen to use the bathroom immediately after them!

    Additionally, I have no issues with vegetarianism at all – I’m sorta jealous, cos it’s not something I could do, despite being mostly unable to justify my carnivorism – any meat I buy in an unprocessed form is ethical from a welfare perspective (£13/$23 for a chicken, anyone?), but if *everyone* ate free range meat, there’d be no room left in the world, so from an environmental perspective, the pork chop that’s come from a pig living in an acre of land isn’t particularly ethical…

    I had a vegetarian friend over last weekend, and cooked a vegetarian paella, and a meat one. Tasting both only reinforced my carnivorism – although if someone invents a vegetarian chorizo, and I may reconsider.

  • http://hugotheatheist.blogspot.com Hugo

    I’m an atheist married to a believer and it is our love of meat that holds us together ;-)
    I can’t stand religious vegetarians (by that I mean vegetarians who are religious about their vegetarianism)

  • http://chatiryworld.typepad Katherine

    I’m a vegetarian atheist who is going to marry a meat-eating atheist next year, religion would be more of a deal breaker for me. My fiance doesn’t eat much meat and always goes for the ethically sourced stuff but I’ve happily dated meat eaters before (just didn’t end happily!).

  • cipher

    For me, also, it would depend upon the extent or intensity of the religious belief and/or the insistence upon meat-eating. The relgious aspect: I could never come to terms with a conservative Christian, and an Orthodox Jew would be problematic as well; however, someone who had an amorphous belief in some sort of absolute, or who identified with Buddhism (although probably not of the Tibetan variety, which tends to be very Western-like in terms of doctrine and devotion) would probably be okay. I’d really be more concerned with whether or not she could defend those beliefs intelligently, and was open to changing her mind.

    As far as vegetarianism is concerned – although I am a vegetarian, I’m not convinced that a completely vegetarian diet is appropriate for everyone. There are differing opinions. However, someone who was an implacable meat-eater would be out.

  • http://friendlyhumanist.blogspot.com Tim Mills

    My wife and I had this conversation just the other day. Our general conclusion was that vegetarianism necessarily affects one’s lifestyle, while religious belief does not.

    I know plenty of religious people whose day-to-day actions are not conspicuously different from mine. I don’t know any non-vegetarians whose day-to-day actions are not conspicuously different from mine.

    So I think mixed diets would be a more divisive issue than mixed beliefs in a relationship. But, as has been mentioned, that depends on how judgmentally those beliefs are held/communicated.

    And how they’re perceived. Despite our efforts to persuade them otherwise, my parents have problems with our vegetarianism – they feel that it means we think less of them. Besides being non-vegetarian, my dad raises beef cattle in western Canada.

    I could not have become a vegetarian if my wife had not done so at the same time.

  • Funkshun

    I think religion is the deal breaker, being in the south has shown that. It is almost impossible to find someone that thinks on the same level or the same way, and only strife follows. What they eat would be an easy compromise compared to religion.

  • dave

    As a vegetarian atheist, religion would be more of a dealbreaker, though it would depend on the degree, of course. I could live with “i like the idea of an afterlife” but probably not “jesus want us to bomb iraq.”

    Oh, yeah, politics is an issue too. :)

  • Audrey

    I’m another vegetarian (well, pescatarian) atheist married to a meat-eater. My spouse thinks I’m crazy for not eating meat. But we agree on politics and religion for the most part, and he eats whatever I cook and seems happy with only eating meat at restaurants so it works out. His mother and brother are also vegetarians so maybe someday he’ll give into peer pressure. :P

  • http://lagrodolcevita.blogspot.com/ Athena

    I’m not a vegetarian, but I am an atheist. My fiance is also an atheist, and I have to admit I was disappointed when he said that he might not have wanted to date me if I were religious.

    I don’t believe that love know bounds created by stupid labels. While I think religion can sometimes be corrupt and a driving force of discrimination and hate in the world that doesn’t mean I think all religious people are bad people.

    Just as I wouldn’t want a religious person to write me off as being immoral without getting to know me first, I refuse to make assumptions about religious people that would keep me from dating one (if I were still single, that is).

  • Grumpy

    Lies, all lies. There are no vegetarian atheists – we’re all baby-eaters, after all.

  • http://veganrepresent.com Dan D Lion

    Mark N said:

    although if someone invents a vegetarian chorizo, and I may reconsider.

    Start reconsidering because there are now several vegan chorizos and they taste great! :)

    i think vegan is to diet as atheism is to reason. Once i realized what we’re doing to non-human animals is being done just because we can made it impossible to stay complicit. I see veganism as part and parcel to my new found skepticality. :)

    Anybody who held on so dearly to eating animals when there is no good reason would make me seriously question them. I do understand it cuz though because i was the biggest meat eater of all. To be fair i know several vegans who date omnivores and usually the omni will eat alongside the vegan except for outings without them etc. This could be a compromise.

    Whereas for somebody who was religious i would be hard-pressed to ask them to be atheist “at home”. Still, i realized even as teenager that god was some f-ed up bullshit. Believing in that crap as an adult would make me question them even more.

  • http://www.kaeldra.com Tracy

    I’m a vegetarian dating a carnivorous atheist, but since I do the cooking, he’s pretty much vegetarian too!

    Atheism and rational thought are critical components of my world view–I can’t see myself being with anyone who didn’t share those, I don’t feel I could make such a strong connection with someone who expressed religious preferences. Nothing personal though!

  • Hann

    I am a vegetarian and anti-theist. I care more about vegetarianism than atheism.

    Peace.

    XVX for life, R.A.S.H. ’til death.

  • http://www.otmatheist.com hoverFrog

    I would hope that I wouldn’t exclude a person because of one or two minor traits, whether that be religion, diet or something like hair or skin colour. As long as the differences weren’t insurmountable I’d like to think I’d make a reasonable effort to integrate their ideas into our relationship.

    I wouldn’t eat meat or go to church (unless the church had a sale or something) and I wouldn’t expect them to give anything up. I would mock their religious beliefs mercilessly and affectionately refer to her as “my Jesus Freak” but I’d expect to be called “the heathen” or “the lettuce muncher”. Relationships are about give and take after all.

    She’d also need to understand that I wouldn’t leave my current girlfriend because relationships are about honesty too.

  • Pat

    Interesting how this question was posed to vegetarian atheists, yet carnies responded- perhaps suggesting some ethical anxiety on their part, or merely suggesting that their diets have caused them to have microstrokes, thereby limiting their ability to read with any understanding. ;-)

    Belief in the supernatural of any kind (karma, Jesus, The Secret) is pretty much a dealbreaker, but so is eating animals.

    In my experience, a good heart and ethical consistency makes for better relationships – even if they believe in some annoyingly stupid things.

    So i’d have to begrudgingly prefer the veg*n christian. There’s no way i’d get seriously involved with someone who eats animals when we simply don’t have to. In fact all the data says it’s a bad idea to eat animals. the ecological and health evidence mounts every day.

    That said, i’d have to admit that if i was really desperately horny, i’d even fork Sarah Palin – but only in the ass, so that it would really hurt.

    And a vegan who sleeps with a meat-eater is what we call a carniwhore. Yes, i know, i’m a slut. A full prostate gland is a terrible thing.

    Please, won’t you give to the the Prevent Prostate-Brain Logic Override Disease Foundation? We don’t test on animals… only really hawt women. ;-)

    PS Cathy’s assertions are not only ridiculous, but the Colombia U. research found that meat eaters were far, far more prone to B-12 deficiency that pure vegetarians. Busted!

  • cipher

    Cathy’s assertions are not only ridiculous, but the Colombia U. research found that meat eaters were far, far more prone to B-12 deficiency that pure vegetarians. Busted!

    What’s this?

  • AnonyMouse

    Geeze… after reading some of these posts, I have to say that I am rather offended by some of the elitism posted by some of these vegetarians out there. Some of their comments seem to boil down to “How DARE meat-eaters voice their opinions? It’s not like they’re RIGHT!”

    They do have a point, though – I haven’t seen any posts posing any of these questions to meat-eaters. It’s almost as though being in the majority – or being “wrong”? – means that we don’t need to express our opinions.

    I would be happy to explain why meat-eating is not inherently unethical (modern meat farming being another story altogether), but it’s clear that my opinion is not wanted here, so I’ll refrain.

  • mh

    I often wonder why omnivorous (not carnivore – humans don’t eat raw flesh) atheists get so riled up over the idea of veganism. The mere mention of the “v” word sends atheists into baseless, illogical arguments. So much so that if you replaced “veganism” with the word “Christian” the arguments would sound like believers (weakly) defending their faith.

    I don’t use animals. It is not necessary to be healthy/happy/whatever.
    I do not believe in a higher being. It is not necessary to be moral/happy/whatever.


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