A Wrap-Up of Camp Quest Texas

A couple weeks ago, I mentioned that there would be a one-day Camp Quest held in Texas.

It was a rousing success! (Kudos go to camp director Amie Parsons!) And it got some positive media coverage:

If that was the reception after a one-day camp, I can’t wait to see what happens when it expands to a full week next summer!

(Thanks to Mary for the link!)

  • TXatheist

    Thank you Amie and everyone who made it happen.

  • http://www.drzach.net Zachary Moore

    It was a great experience for everyone, and the North Texas Church of Freethought was thrilled to support it! If you’re a parent in Texas, please contact Amie if you’re interested in the summer camp for 2010!

  • http://anti-mattr.blogspot.com mathyoo

    Awesome! I’d love to do start a Camp Quest here in Colorado next summer, and starting with a one day camp would be a great way to start. Any other readers here from CO want to help out?

  • Erik

    The lady closing out the newscast really didn’t look to happy to be talking about it.

  • Mark C.

    It would have been nicer had they not used the phrase “atheist camp”. Still, good clip.

  • Scott Turner

    Wouldn’t it be great if we built a national summer camp on a beautiful lake with the most cool programs, trips, and staff in the nation – and an interesting freethought curriculum, maybe even a debate team. Make the kind of camp that every kid would would want to spend one or two weeks of the summer.

    Maybe somebody would endow a project like this and, eventually, have summer camp scholarships and internships available for less privileged kids.

  • Claudia

    It’s awesome to see positive coverage, though I admit I cringed a few times. I think a camp for “atheists and nonbelievers” was a really weird choice of words. Atheists ARE nonbelievers. Mostly though I’m just really uncomfortable with the application of religious labels to young kids (yes, I’m a Dawkinsbot, so shoot me). Even the atheist mother of a five year old did it, though the piece DID helpfully note that the child was too young to understand the concepts yet.

  • ChameleonDave

    Mostly though I’m just really uncomfortable with the application of religious labels to young kids.

    Well, there is an argument for using the term ‘atheist’ to refer to all people, until such time as they are indoctrinated into a religion. It’s the same as the concept according to which kids are ‘innocent’ until they start doing bad stuff later in life.

  • Amy G

    I think the camp is a great idea, and it looks like it was a lot of fun for the kids! I agree with Mark C. I don’t like the “atheist camp” label it was given. When Amie described the camp, it sounded like it was simply a non-religious camp that encouraged critical thinking for all children, but “atheist camp” implies that non-atheists aren’t welcome there anymore than atheists are welcome at Christian summer camps. I like the idea of a camp that simply allows all types of children to learn about the world and have fun without having to think about religious or non-religious beliefs. I don’t blame Amie- I blame the “unbiased” news station.

  • William

    First Amie and the other organizers did a great job getting everything ready and having everything set up for the kids. What I find interesting is that I led the group of 12-15 year olds and not once did religion get brought up either by me or the kids. We mainly discussed the scientific method and science in general. But I would say about 90% was having fun at a petting zoo, making pottery and playing games and letting kids be kids. My favorite part with my kids was helping them make UFO pics and seeing their ideas to come up with the shot and angle.

    I cannot wait for next year.

  • Heidi

    You guys in Texas have your work cut out for you, but you’re doing great! Congratulations on your success. Good luck with next year’s camp.


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