Does Vallejo, CA Mayor Osby Davis Want a Theocracy?

The mayor of Vallejo, California is Osby Davis and he’s a conservative Christian.

That’s an issue only because he’s bringing his church teachings into the political sphere.

A couple weeks ago, he was quoted in the New York Times:

… Mr. Cloutier was defeated — by only two votes — by Osby Davis, a devout Assemblies of God follower. “I don’t know what the fear is about considering Vallejo as a city of God,” Mayor Davis said. If believed, he said, “that God created heaven and earth and everything that’s in it, and that God is sovereign, then you believe that he is already a part of this community and this is already his city; and so what’s the big deal?”

Mr. Davis thought the question asked about the Folsom Street Fair was “really, really unfair.” But his faith does inform the way he sees gay people. “They’re committing sin and that sin will keep them out of heaven,” he said. “But you don’t hate the person. You hate the sin that they commit.”

So Davis managed to tear down any wall of separation between church and state. And he condemned the GLBT community to hell.

Not bad for two paragraphs of work.

Davis later apologized about his anti-gay remarks. (He must have forgotten; you’re not supposed to say those things out loud!)

The NYT has released both a transcript and audio of the original interview to provide a greater context.

It turns out Davis said a number of disturbing things, and the NYT did him a favor by limiting what they quoted. Davis just kept digging his own hole deeper and deeper… the Q(uestioner) is NYT columnist Scott James:

Q: I think the concern has to do with some phrase that I’ve heard that people want to make Vallejo into a, quote, “City of God.” That seems to be the sticking thing, that possibly what some people have in mind is a theocracy, ripping down the division between church and state.

A: I don’t know what the fear is considering Vallejo a “City of God.” If you have the faith that we have and believe God created heaven and earth and everything in it and God is sovereign then you believe that he is already a part of this community and this is already his city, so, what’s the big deal?

Q: I think the big deal is that the version of God is a Christian God.

A: Well, that’s our faith. Our faith is a Christian God. Someone else’s faith might be a Muslim whose god is Allah, but does that mean we shrink back from exercising our faith because our faith is not consistent with someone else’s? No it does not. It means that we can exercise our faith right along someone exercising theirs. If we as a Christian faith community want to consider this as a city of God, who is it hurting? The principles upon which a city of God would stand are principles of love, mercy and grace so I don’t see how that in and of itself would hinder anyone else’s ability to call a city whatever they want to call it.

Love, mercy, and grace? Right… unless you’re gay.

The fact that Davis managed to barely eke out a political victory should just give us all the more incentive to support advocates of church/state separation who run for political office, regardless of their faith.

This man is a lawsuit waiting to happen.

(Thanks to Alan for the link)

  • PrimeNumbers

    Sounds like people like him are exactly the reason Church / State separation is necessary.

    But his comments about homosexuals are terrible. Who does he think he is to criticize like that? I severely doubt that he is without sin…

  • Trace

    Hate the ignorance, not the ignorant?

  • Miko

    If I were going to be a one-issue voter, that issue would be ending the war in {list of countries that the U.S. is currently at war with}. Or, it would be ending torture, repealing the PATRIOT Act, restoring the Constitutional guarantees (especially in the Fourth and Fifth Amendments) and trying those responsible for breaking them previously for treason (with the death penalty as a possible sentence, although I don’t support it in general) in order to ensure that it never happens again, or ending the budget deficit and amending the Constitution so that any future budget deficit is taken out entirely in the name of the members of Congress who vote in favor of the budget rather than in the name of the American people.

    While I certainly support church/state separation (as part of my platform of church/everything and state/everything separation), it’s far away from being one of the most serious problems/considerations right now, even if one has the audacity to actually support a candidate for political office (in distinction from merely opposing her opponent even more than her).

  • Sesoron

    I bet there are three atheists in Vallejo really kicking themselves right now.

  • keddaw

    Never mind the gay issue – I am a non-married person who enjoys having heterosexual, consensual sex with adult women, he’d have me strung up too.

    The only way to guarantee a fair hearing for all religions is to have all public officials be athiests.

  • Christophe Thill

    If “exercising his faith” implies imposing a theocratic semi-dictatorship, intolerant policies and religious skull-stuffing, then yes, I hope people will prevent him to do so.

  • Revyloution

    I wonder what he would think of my rebuttal to the ‘dont hate the person’ line?

    Don’t hate the believer, hate the stupid crap he believes in.

  • Alan E.

    Why doesn’t god answer Vallejo’s prayers for money? They are bankrupt and can’t afford to pay for many basic public services.

  • http://primesequence.blogspot.com/ PrimeNumbers

    Revyloution – don’t hate the bullshitter, just the bullshit, eh? Like it!

  • Richard Wade

    Mr. Davis makes a serious mistake in his use of first person plural pronouns:

    Well, that’s our faith. Our faith is a Christian God. Someone else’s faith might be a Muslim whose god is Allah, but does that mean we shrink back from exercising our faith because our faith is not consistent with someone else’s? No it does not. It means that we can exercise our faith right along someone exercising theirs. If we as a Christian faith community want to consider this as a city of God, who is it hurting?

    Apparently, Mr. Davis thinks that his little town is sitting on a hilltop in France, surrounded by walls, and is in the 10th century. Apparently, anyone not in the “we” category of his own religion is just a (barely) tolerated visitor to his little fiefdom, rather than a legitimate citizen.

  • Edmond

    Love the faithful, hate the faith

  • muggle

    Miko, those issues are church/state issues. Everything you mention goes back to the same motive. The wars may be partially motivated by oil but that’s at least even with the Christian vs. Muslim though no one wants to admit that. Okay, maybe not the budget deficit but the rest. And how much of the budget deficit is because of this holy war and funding faith based iniatives?

    Revyloution, I do look forward to your posts. I am absolutely going to have to remember that comeback!

    What can I say? The guy’s an ass. The truly worrisome thing is that opening his mouth and inserting foot hasn’t driven him out of office. As yet, anyway.

  • http://denkeensechtna.blogspot.com/ Deen

    If believed, he said, “that God created heaven and earth and everything that’s in it, and that God is sovereign, then you believe that he is already a part of this community and this is already his city; and so what’s the big deal?”

    Apparently it didn’t occur to the guy that the question wasn’t whether the Christians had any problem with it…


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