My Night at a Focus on the Family Event

Friday night, Jen McCreight and I attended a “Celebrate Family Tour” at Wheaton College, hosted by Focus on the Family.

Why? Because it was so close… and what better way to spend your Friday night than getting silently furious while listening to Christians talk about how they’re superior to atheists with regards to raising children, having morals, and caring for others?

We were there for over two hours. You know what? There wasn’t a single mention of Prop 8 or gay marriage all night.

I felt cheated. That’s like going to a Jimmy Buffett concert and not hearing “Margaritaville.”

But the rest of the event didn’t disappoint. I learned quite a bit actually. Here is my random assortment of thoughts throughout the night… which I jotted down on a “donate to Focus” envelope during the evening:

  • We tried hard on the drive there to come up with a solid cover story in case someone asked why we were there.

    We decided to go with: Jen was my wife and she was converting me to Christianity (because, um, Hinduism is the Devil’s work). Our anniversary? 3/14 — we’re nerds so we could remember that easily. Our rings? CRAP! We didn’t have those.

    Cover stories are hard to come by.

    It didn’t matter, though. No one asked us why we were there.

  • A video was played featuring the president of Focus, Jim Daly. He seemed like a really nice guy, actually — both in the video and in person when he spoke. In the video, though, he explained that parents deal with complex issues all the time. For example — and I quote — “How come my nine-year-old is saying ‘no’ to me all the time? That’s something I gotta correct.”

    Really? That’s your problem? What else would you expect…? I know conservative Christians like obedience, but a little bit of rebellion is not always a bad thing. I’d be shocked if a nine-year-old said “yes” to everything I asked. A kid saying “no”? Annoying, perhaps, but not really a problem.

  • They are still thrilled about the Tim Tebow Super Bowl ad. Because, you know, all of us are still talking about it. The ad, by the way, only indirectly talked about the pro-life position… more than anything, it directed people to Focus on the Family’s website. But the way they spoke about it, you would think a billion viewers decided at that very moment they would never again support abortion. That didn’t happen.

    The media frenzy was never about being pro-life, anyway. The story was always about whether commercials dealing with controversial social issues should be allowed to run during the Super Bowl.

  • The Focus on the Family speakers seemed to put a notch on the bedpost every time someone heard about Jesus through them. One example offered to us was a DVD series Focus created about Christianity. During the filming, we were told, 27 of the Comcast crew members came up to one of the producers and asked him to tell them more about Jesus.

    The audience gasped and applauded at that.

    I didn’t get it. If I were working on the crew, I’d want to hear more about what this guy had to say… because he was saying a lot of things that made no sense (“We’re intelligently designed!”). Hell, I was at this event Friday night. That doesn’t mean I support Focus on the Family.

    They’re making the mistake of assuming anyone who wants to know more about them — or attends their events, or questions what they do — is interested in becoming a Christian. Not all of us are.

  • They urged parents to get their children to watch a Focus-produced children’s series called JellyTelly because “the alternative is Nick at Nite.”

    Evil, blasphemous, heathenific Nick at Nite.

    How dare they schedule such awful, un-family-friendly programs like The Cosby Show, Family Matters, and The Nanny?

    Keep the kids away!

  • During a live taping of the Focus on the Family radio show, the guests were Dr. Emerson and Sarah Eggerichs who run a lot of marriage workshops, have written bestselling books, etc. Jen will have more to say about them, I’m sure, but the bit that stood out the most was when they discussed how men see the world out of “Blue” glasses and women see the world out of “Pink” glasses.

    Cute/funny example of this: When a woman says, “I have nothing to wear,” she really means she has nothing new to wear. When a man says, “I have nothing to wear,” he really means he has nothing clean to wear. [Cue laughter]

    Yes, there are always different roles in relationships and tendencies for a man or woman to do certain things. But they are not universal.

    I know couples where the woman is the confident and business-minded one while the husband is more emotional and the stay-at-home type. (Obviously, gay couples don’t fit into this picture at all.)

    Maybe what annoyed me was their assumption that every relationship was virtually identical. The women had to show “respect” to their husbands and the husbands had to show “love” to their wives, and they each had to fulfill particular roles (that I feel either person could fulfill). Single parents, divorced parents, gay parents? Move along now, nothing to see here.

    It played over well with the Christian crowd. But Jen and I were constantly looking at each other with looks that screamed *facepalm*.

  • In that last section, I mentioned the guests were Dr. Emerson and Sarah Eggerichs. I don’t know why they got equal billing. Sarah barely spoke. It’s not the first time I’ve seen that either, where the Christian husband and wife are the face of a particular product, but it’s the husband who does all the talking (see April 30th). The wife’s role was to be submissive unless prompted otherwise. When she did speak, it seemed to be only after her husband said, “Sarah, tell them about that time…”

    It was like watching Penn & Teller. There may be two people up there, but you only hear one of them. She was a trophy wife, put on display to give it that “couple-y” feel… but if she had not been there tonight, the conversation would have been basically the same.

  • After the taping of the radio show, a “Christian comedian” came on stage. He was actually really funny. He mentioned god once or twice, but his schtick was mostly about his wife and kids — universal things that made everyone laugh.

    Then, after his “official” set was done, he got very serious. Too serious. And he got very preachy. I don’t have this part verbatim… but at one point here, he said something like, “Joy is central to Christianity. Sure, atheists and agnostics can be joyous, but it’s not central to their lives. It’s peripheral.” Implying that we’re all depressed, sad, godless individuals.

    What. The. Hell.

    That’s not even a joke. Or crouched inside a joke. That’s just plain wrong. If anything, we rationalists know we only have this life to live — there’s no heaven or hell waiting for us — so we try to find happiness/love/joy wherever we can.

    I’ve never seen a comedian have a wonderful set, get the audience laughing loudly, and then just purposely kill that mood he created. Maybe we were the only ones who weren’t inspired at the end, but I went from wanting to share his talent with people I know to wanting to send them emails explaining what he thinks about atheists.

  • I’ll give credit to Focus on the Family for this: Based on what I heard them say, they’re doing really wonderful work when it comes to adoption — placing kids in loving (albeit only Christian) homes. They’re really trying to help couples strengthen their marriage, especially when things get rough.

    I like that. I support that. I don’t care about the Bible-based way they do it, but those are good values to support regardless of faith.

    So why do I cringe every time I hear their organization’s name mentioned?

    Maybe it’s because they’ve built their reputation on making it so damn difficult for gay and lesbian couples to adopt kids and strengthen their own relationships.

    They don’t see that as hypocrisy. I do.

And then it was over. As we walked out, Jen and I figured we needed some proof that the event happened… so here you go :) (Sorry for the quality. It’s an iPhone camera.)



(You can read Jen’s writeup of the evening here.)

  • http://ottodestruct.com Otto

    One example offered to us was a DVD series Focus created about Christianity. During the filming, we were told, 27 of the Comcast crew members came up to one of the producers and asked him to tell them more about Jesus.

    It’s almost 100% certain that that did not happen.

    This is the type of thing you see a lot at these fundamentalist religious revival type of things. People make this claim all the time. “Witnessing” and such is a big deal to these people. Problem is that it’s all a big lie. In some cases, it’s actually a delusion. The person may believe they did it, when they did not. Basically, they imagine it, and then have trouble telling fantasy from reality. I’ve seen it happen before.

    • Wooddove2

       You are a colossal idiot.

  • Stephen P

    I really wouldn’t worry about cover stories in situations like this. They are more likely to hinder than help (except perhaps if you are investigating something which is probably illegal). Just say you’re probably going to have children one day – you don’t need to specify who with – and you want to hear what they have to say.

  • What Would Professor Pat Pending Do?

    During the filming, we were told, 27 of the Comcast crew members came up to one of the producers and asked him to tell them more about Jesus.

    I thought that only happened in Chick tracts.

  • http://whoreofalltheearth.blogspot.com Whore of All the Earth

    I read Jen’s report too. Sounds like hella fun!

  • http://primesequence.blogspot.com/ PrimeNumbers

    Great report – interesting to read what goes on behind the curtain

  • littlejohn

    I wonder what FoF would think of my marriage? I’ve been in a happy heterosexual marriage for 28 years. So far so good.
    But marriage is for procreation, right? Medically, my wife and I both are incapable of making babies. Kind of like a gay marriage.
    Finally, I’m shy and unambitious, but I do like to cook. So I keep house. My outgoing wife, who has a graduate degree, earns all our money.
    I don’t think we’re the kind of couple they’d like to talk about.

  • http://www.lavenderliberal.com/ Buffy

    When will they learn that Leave it to Beaver wasn’t a documentary, and isn’t a blueprint for any society–let alone 21st century society.

  • Dan

    they’re doing really wonderful work when it comes to adoption — placing kids in loving (albeit only Christian) homes… I like that. I support that. I don’t care about the Bible-based way they do it, but those are good values to support regardless of faith.

    Yeah, but the Christian home will greet the child with child abuse by scaring them with hell, with the idea that the child is broken, sinful, has to repent. The kid will be another person on this earth with a chance of hating gay people, maybe even attacking them. Another child to wander the streets witnessing to everyone.

    They’ll be ashamed of their bodies, they may enter into a marriage without having sex and then find themselves stuck with a spouse whom they can’t have a sexual relationship with, thus making them bitter to everyone outside the home, and possibly abusive to their spouse.

    This child will grow up to be an adult who will raise a kid and poison them the same way they were poisoned, keeping the cycle of Christianity alive.

    So in short, I don’t like that. I don’t support that.

  • Ivan

    The Friendly Atheist is way too friendly. More rage, less “oh they’re such NICE people” please! :^)

    The thing about kids saying no to parents is just the tip of the iceberg in their whole authoritarian system. Children need to be beaten into conformity, dontcha know! There’s a somewhat infamous and inadvertently very revealing story told by the founder of Focus on the FamilyPatriarchy on this topic.

    I thought that only happened in Chick tracts.

    LOL, exactly! The real story is probably more like “one of the producers managed to awkwardly proselytize 27 crew members who were too polite to tell him to get stuffed.”

  • Stephan

    I felt gypped.

    Many construe “gypped” as a racial slur against gypsies…you might want to cut that.

  • http://considertheteacosy.wordpress.com/ fraggle

    Wait, godless types don’t see joy as central to our lives? That’s a bit bizarre, since ever since I came to terms with the ‘only one life’ bit, I’ve felt quite driven to stuff as much joy and awesomeness into the time I’ve got. Far more than when I had the idea in the back of my mind that it’d all be okay and that I’d get another chance after this one.

    …which is why I am now going to make a delicious sandwich and then go for a cycle on this sunny afternoon. Trees! Nature! Yummy food! Good company!

  • Conrad

    I know couples where the woman is the confident and business-minded one while the husband is more emotional and the stay-at-home type. (Obviously, gay couples don’t fit into this picture at all.)

    I light-heartedly accuse you of pre-judging.

  • Reginald Selkirk

    (because, um, Hinduism is the Devil’s work).

    Yo? What is your Jainist family going to think when they find out you try to pass yourself off as Hindu?

    Jainism is the best religion.

  • Reginald Selkirk

    Joy is central to Christianity.

    Joy? I thought it was guilt.

  • Centricci

    3/14?
    the only 3/14 i know of, is Job 3:14….and that’s only from watching Mission Impossible.

  • writeon1960

    My daughter took me to a “born again Christian church”, everyone was crying about their sins and handing kleenex around. I told my daughter I rather cry in the privacy of my own home. She saw through them pretty fast and we moved on…

  • http://miketheinfidel.blogspot.com/ MikeTheInfidel

    Centricci: Pi.

  • Centricci

    Doh. Of course. Thanks Mike.

  • Angel

    The only thing that rubbed me the wrong way about this piece is the use of the word gypped.

    Other than that? I’m quite pleased with the way you and Jen presented your experiences at the meeting. It was very fair and hopefully will continue to prove to more Christians that having open dialogues with people who may challenge your beliefs isn’t unreasonable!

  • http://friendlyatheist.com Hemant Mehta

    By popular demand, I’m replacing the word “gypped” with “cheated.” Thanks for pointing that out, all.

  • Jennifer

    Ditto to Stephan on the “gypped” comment. Its roots are definitely in racial slurs against gypsies. I hate to see good non-racist people unknowingly using this ugly term.

  • lurker111

    “When a man says, “I have nothing to wear,” he really means he has nothing clean to wear.”

    I hate shopping for clothes so much that when _I_ say, “I have nothing to wear,” I really have nothing to wear … :(

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  • Amy

    One example offered to us was a DVD series Focus created about Christianity. During the filming, we were told, 27 of the Comcast crew members came up to one of the producers and asked him to tell them more about Jesus.

    My guess is this wasn’t “Tell me more about Jesus!” so much as it was “That’s interesting. Did that really happen?” or some such smallish comment. Or maybe they just can’t count.

  • JB Tait

    If you are an aware parent, you never set your kid up to want to lie to you or say “no” to your instructions. If your kid says “no” then ask “why.” That starts a discussion. Maybe they will change their assertion when they understand, or maybe {gasp} you were wrong.

    And when -I- say, “I have nothing to wear,” it will mean my house burned down while I was in the shower. This isn’t a joke–it happened to a dear friend, and she had to be given a firefighter’s coat to cover her complete nakedness.

    Then the joy thing. I thought the Christian complaint was that godless atheists do what they want instead of what God demands. Wouldn’t that be a complaint they are enjoying life too much?

  • http://skepticalmom.com Lexi

    They’re making the mistake of assuming anyone who wants to know more about them — or attends their events, or questions what they do — is interested in becoming a Christian. Not all of us are.

    This. I saw this all the time when I briefly attended a fundy church. I remember when the group from my church returned from a Promise Keepers rally. That Sunday, our pastor told us about their charter bus driver, who was Jewish. The dudes from my church all witnessed to him, and in the end, the Jewish bus driver said something polite and non-committal, like, “Maybe I’ll learn more about this Jesus guy.” The pastor then spent the rest of his sermon congratulating himself (and the other Promise Keepers, but mostly himself) for converting the bus driver!

  • AJPIII

    First and foremost Jen is hot, sexy, smart, sassy and bright (read your “blag”)… That said marketing demographics neatly refer to such unions as “Double Income No Children (DINC) regardless of orientation.
    Penn & Teller meets a preachy Lenny Bruce how did y’all survive is this a kind of academic “rubbernecking?” Maybe it’s me projecting but it seems like a mix of curiosity unwittingly turned into masochistic schadenfreude! I would certainly invite y’all to report on academic lectures of how the human brain come up with this stuff, etc. However it always a good point to investigate and reveal how many “xtians” are self proclaimed “chauvinists” who openly perpetrate the affliction of generational abuse to women and children. Bravely reported, now may I buy y’all a drink OR 2?

  • Max

    The Miraculous Conversion of the Heatrhen Twenty-Seven never happened. 27 never happens. 27 is a number people use when they have to make up a number. In real life, there is no 27.

  • http://www.frommormontoatheist.blogspot.com Leilani

    First, I watched the SuperBowl and I don’t even remember an anti-choice commercial (granted I got up during most commercials to get more beer or stretch my legs). Secondly, this is the first time I have ever heard of Tim Tebow. I don’t think that commercial was as much of a success as they thought it was. Plus, don’t SuperBowl commercials cost tons of money? Couldn’t they have fed and clothed a bunch of people for that amount of money? I think someone has their priorities screwed up.

    I love when my kids tell me ‘no’. I love hearing why they are disagreeing with me. I love that they are learning to challenge authority. Granted, I still make the decisions as they are 3 and 4, but sometimes they have a valid argument. I would never want to extinguish that.

    I have more joy in my life now that I don’t have all the guilt from religion. I love that my kids take so much pride in being made up of stars. I love that I no longer take things at face value and I love that I learn so much more from my fellow atheists, than I ever learned in church. I think they need to look up the definition of the word ‘joy’. As the need to believe in a mythical creature has nothing to do with it.

    I had no idea that the term ‘gypped’ was in reference to gypsies. Now that I see it typed out, it makes sense, but I shall never use the term again. Gosh, I learn so much from you guys. :)

  • http://annainca.blogspot.com Anna

    During the filming, we were told, 27 of the Comcast crew members came up to one of the producers and asked him to tell them more about Jesus.

    This story does’t even make sense. On the off chance that these Comcast crew members (the people who set up the cables? the lighting?) were not already Christians, they’d never heard of Jesus before? What, were they from some other country? And 27 of them? I could buy one or two, but that’s just not even remotely believable.

    “Joy is central to Christianity. Sure, atheists and agnostics can be joyous, but it’s not central to their lives. It’s peripheral.” Implying that we’re all depressed, sad, godless individuals.

    Hey, I thought we were all supposed to be wanton hedonists? They should really make up their minds, LOL.

    So why do I cringe every time I hear their organization’s name mentioned? Maybe it’s because they’ve built their reputation on making it so damn difficult for gay and lesbian couples to adopt kids and strengthen their own relationships.

    There are more reasons to cringe than that. What about their penchant for ritualized corporal punishment (with implements) so that their children will be submissive? That’s why a nine-year-old saying “no” is such a big deal. What about their sexism and focus on men’s superiority over women? They openly promote patriarchy. What about their ties to the Christian dominionist movement? All in all, it’s a very scary group. Individual members may not be quite as extreme as the leadership, but I wouldn’t necessarily bet on it.

  • SickoftheUS

    Going to a FOTF event together?…that’s a big step. Just admit you two are steady.

  • Sarah TX

    I don’t have any problem criticising Focus on the Family for ‘encouraging’ young or single mothers to give their children up for adoption to ‘stable, Christian families’ without devoting adequate time or resources to the needs of the birth parents. Furthermore, there are so many ethical and practical issues with international adoption that Christian adoption agencies just overlook – this seems to be a great blog post on the topic. In short, like many things, FotF thinks that their heart is in the right place, but their delusions of divine right can blind them to the harm they are doing.

  • Barry

    We all see things through the lense we bring to the event. I am a Christian. I can see why you interpret things the way you do. But I’m reading what FOF is being credited with saying, and the intent of most of these comments were taken incorrectly. Again, I understand the trip to the event was made with an agenda and it needed to be achieved.

    I don’t agree w/ everything that FOF is about, but I certainly don’t see evil in what they are doing.

    If I would go to a Hindu rally somewhere, and I wanted to interpret what was said to meet an agenda to bash it, I’m sure I could. Or any political rally.

    Instead, I would hope you could hear people from a platform less cynical. It’s a sad enough world, why look for evils where they do not lie.

  • http://vancouvermoose.livejournal.com/ VancouverMoose

    Cover stories are hard to come by.

    It didn’t matter, though. No one asked us why we were there.

    This seems to be a common element in stories where bloggers/journalists go undercover at larger conservative christian events.

    Perhaps attendees don’t want to talk to strangers because they might be exposed to ideas that they don’t already agree with.

  • muggle

    If your kid says “no” then ask “why.” That starts a discussion. Maybe they will change their assertion when they understand, or maybe {gasp} you were wrong.

    Thank you. Raising my daughter, I told her one thing, she was free to question the reason for any rule I laid down. If I couldn’t give her a reason, the rule was gone, plain and simple. I doubt she was always happy with my reason (i.e., you have to go to bed at a set time so you won’t be tired for school tomorrow) but I still feel that was fair. I don’t recall off hand what but I do remember a couple of times having to remove the rule.

    Continued with my grandson within reason. He is, after all, not my child. So Mommy decides the rules and I respect them. I have to say when babysitting him, it’s your mother’s rule, even if I don’t agree with it, because he’s her kid. I do, if he complains, tell him to ask her why. I’ve noticed that he does and she answers him.

    Mostly, she’s too lenient.

    No way could I sit through that torture, Hemant. I’d have been fuming and probably have gotten lynched for muttering under my breath.

  • muggle

    I almost forgot:

    while listening to Christians talk about how they’re superior to atheists with regards to raising children

    tell that to my daughter who had one Christian parent and one Atheist. She’ll give you a fucking earful on the matter.

    This one drives me insane because I’m an Atheist parent who had to protect my child from their Christian parent. I doubt I’m alone.

  • Kimpatsu

    Jen should have gone wearing boobquake apparel. That would have been perfect!

  • http://www.banalleakage.com martymankins

    Great write up and review of the night’s events.

    Hemant wrote (and quoted the Christian comedian)

    “… Sure, atheists and agnostics can be joyous, but it’s not central to their lives. It’s peripheral.” Implying that we’re all depressed, sad, godless individuals.”

    What. The. Hell.

    That’s not even a joke. Or crouched inside a joke. That’s just plain wrong. If anything, we rationalists know we only have this life to live — there’s no heaven or hell waiting for us — so we try to find happiness/love/joy wherever we can.

    This is a very central idea to the Mormon religion. While there are parts of making this life good, it’s all based on how it all plays out in the afterlife. The life in a Celestial Kingdom, with Heavenly Father…. It’s sad, because this life is all any of us have. We have one life to make it good – nothing before or nothing after. I want to make sure my focus isn’t selfish. My life is good because I surround myself with others that want the same – religious or not. But when friends that I’ve known and grew up around in the Mormon church find out I left over 15 years ago, they treat me differently. Their only care for me is if I ever came back to the “fold”

    You also made another excellent point with the word superior. Those that cling to the Christian religion pretty close feel they are right and everyone else is wrong. The Mormons go a step further and strongly believe (and for a while and still do) teach that they are the only true christian religion. Talk about being superior.

    I enjoy these post where you are a silent minority in the crowd of majority. It’s a much more honest view of what really this is all about.

  • Reginald Selkirk

    ‘Joyous atheists’: the ultimate oxymoron?
    by Francis Phillips

    Pretty ridiculous, and at least they haven’t deleted the negative comments since I last checked.

  • Matt

    Reginald, they have not deleted the negative comments so far, which is an encouraging sign. From what I’ve read, many of the most recent comments are from atheists who offer fantastic arguments, criticizing the author for thinking in such black-and-white terms and seeking exclusive ownership over a word that does not necessarily imply spirituality at all. Instead, she is promoting one of the worst stereotypes against atheists when I’d be willing to bet that she has never had a substantive conversation with one about the lives that they lead.

    “Again, I understand the trip to the event was made with an agenda and it needed to be achieved.”

    There’s nothing necessarily wrong about going there with an agenda. Their agenda was to understand what Focus on the Family says at these gatherings, and some attempts were made to genuinely reach an understanding, such as complimenting them on their programs for adoption. Not fully reaching that mutual understanding doesn’t imply a negative, ineffective agenda.

  • http://ncsecular.org/ Jennifer Lovejoy

    Both my kids have always been good at saying “no”. Throughout the years I have been preached at for having kids that say no to me and question things. I am beyond thrilled that my kids know how to say “no”. Yes it can be annoying at times, but and most importantly my kids have no fear in saying no to anyone, including voices of authority, when they are uncomfortable or don’t like something.
    As for the submissive wife part…. that would be a big NO! My husband and I are equals. We each have our strengths and weaknesses and I believe we compliment each other well. My husband would lose his mind if he had to make all the decisions. He’d rather be a trophy husband. =)

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  • http://kaleenamenke.blogspot.com Kaleena

    You are still more than welcome to come to Colorado Springs and experience the real thing! And go down the super cool, three-story slide!

  • Emilia

    I’ve got no love for Focus on the Family, but I will be honest and say that left-wingers have their own brand of “family values” as well that they don’t hesitate to impose on others. FotF don’t want gays and lesbians to adopt children. On the other hand, due to the left wing’s view that spanking children is wrong (here I’m not talking about whipping a kid with a belt but for instance giving a light tap on the behind to a child who’s running towards a busy street – which I did once with my own daughter), here in Canada you can’t adopt children if you use corporal punishment. I tend to be fairly left-leaning myself, but I can’t deny that some liberals can be as closed-minded as their right-wing counterparts.

  • Emilia

    Also, people talk a lot about hypocrisy among the so-called “family values” crowd, such as three quarters of them trumpeting the virtues of (heterosexual) marriage yet divorcing (ex. Dr. Laura). On the other hand, the left-wing family values crowd can be just as hypocritical in their own way, ex. anti-spanking advocates striking their children in a moment of anger. So don’t think that FotF has the corner on sanctimony or hypocrisy.

  • Steve

    Oh please. Not even on the same level. You won’t see anyone going around demanding that everyone spank their children and threatening them and society with ghastly consequences if they don’t.

  • Emilia

    Don’t get me wrong: some of the pro-spanking advocates can be pretty obnoxious, like the ones who blamed the Columbine massacre on the supposed demise of spanking. The difference between them and many (not all, but many) anti-spanking advocates is that the “pro” side basically limit themselves to verbal bloviating. As you said, Steve, they’re not demanding by law that everyone spank their children. On the other hand, many anti-spanking advocates would like to impose their opinion on others by legally banning even non-abusive physical discipline. So there’s the difference.

  • Wooddove

    Speaking of hypocrisy, I find it pretty dang hypocritical for a couple of atheists/agnostics to go to an event they KNOW is in opposition to their belief system,  LIE about themselves and the reason for their presence; and then look for opportunities to  criticize.  Seriously? 

    You reek so badly of hypocrisy, deception, arrogance, prejudice and left-leaning legalism that I can smell it right through the internet.  You won’t be, but you should be ashamed.


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