A Christian Calls Out Christian Movies

It’s always nice to hear a Christian admitting what we’ve all known for a long time:

The term Christian film has become synonymous with substandard production values, stilted dialogue and childish plots. Why is Christian film no more than a side note to modern culture? Why are Christians left behind?

Rather than developing organically, the average Christian film is more pushy and sanctimonious than the global-warming agenda movies. Violence is almost non-existent, salty language never happens, unmarried people never struggle with lust and evil is never very bad, because showing various forms of sin is not allowed. By movie’s end, everyone is converted with no residual issues. Life is reduced to an after-school special with prayer thrown in for good measure. For me, this is where the dry heaving begins.

Restrictions on content are there, presumably, because people believe it to be biblical. Such restrictions keep me from producing a movie accurate to Scripture, itself. It is a tough argument to think modern Christians cannot handle a simple kiss or rough language when God allowed Joshua to slaughter thousands behind the walls of Jericho.

It’s not just Christian movies, though. This is a symptom of a larger problem.

Christian music often has to have a certain number of JPMs (Jesus-per-minute).

Christian video games are just awful.

Christian comedians barely register in pop culture. (Quick: Name one!)

When I wrote I Sold My Soul on eBay, my Christian publishers were excellent to work with and never tried to change the true meaning of what I was writing. But my editor’s suggestions were often along the lines of, “Christians will tune out if you say this that bluntly. You have to tone it down for them.”

It all speaks to this idea you have to be gentle with Christians or they won’t be able to handle it. You must sanitize what you present to them because they won’t be able to take it if you’re “too real.” Christians so often create their own insulated, isolated reality because the real world doesn’t agree with their views. You have to treat Christian beliefs with kid gloves. Any deviation must be resisted.

No wonder non-Christians don’t pay much attention to Christian pop culture. We prefer the truth, no matter what tone it takes, no matter what it tells us. You’ll never hear the phrase, “Be careful what you say. You might offend the atheists!”

  • Kimpatsu

    If you mean a stand-up comedian who happens to be a Xian, then Welsh comic Milton Jones qualifies, although he doesn’t do religious jokes. He does puns. (Example: on being shown a photo of the Queen meeting the leader of the Sioux nation, he declared:
    Queen: I don’t know where I am!
    Sioux: Not worry. I am Sat-Navaho.
    Ho ho ho!

  • The Vicar

    Hmmm. I think that last jab has more to do with numbers than preferences. If atheists were in the majority, then publishers and editors and producers would be trying to avoid offending us.

    Mind you, I have a sneaking suspicion that the self-censorship involved in trying not to offend Christians (or any other religious group) is far more disruptive to quality than that needed to try to avoid offending atheists. But if we were in the majority, that might change, since power rather famously corrupts.

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  • Hermes

    Jared Diamond had some anthropology observations about animal husbandry; humans have attempted to domesticate just about every animal they have ever encountered especially herd and pack animals.

    To extend that, humans also applied those skills to other humans as well. Slavery, rearing children to continue the family line, selling children for marriage or carefully picking mates for breading potential, … the examples are easy to see.

    Humans domesticated themselves.

    Humans are an infantile species, just like other domesticated animals but more so. We have extended childhood as well as our physical juvenile features such as thin soft hair, long learning periods early on, a general inability to help ourselves before we are nearly fully grown, and the penchant to please and follow. Religions are one set of institutions that are used to implement human domestication; Religion is animal husbandry applied to humans.

    So, why should this story surprise anyone?

    I’d be surprised if childish psychological sheltering was not implemented, just as I’m not surprised (just disappointed) with the advocacy of beating children in ways that few pet owners would treat their animals. It would be out of character to see both angles of manipulation not being used by groups that are highly religious.

  • Eddie

    I had on idea that Milton Jones was. I actually find him funny. Probably because he’s a Brit Xian and they aren’t always as intense. I like one pun he did especially:

    I’m a bit of a man for the ladies…
    even when the gents are clearly signposted.

    Still somewhat disappointed he’s part of the dogma.

  • http://cannonballjones.wordpress.com Paul

    “you have to be gentle with Christians or they won’t be able to handle it”

    It’s all too true in many cases unfortunately. This week my year-long relationship with a wonderful Christian woman ended, much to my dismay. I was ready to look at any compromise, any way around the fact that she was a devout and rather fundamentalist believer (born again after a dark period in her life). Anyway, the first time I knew we had problems, many months ago, was when we were lying in bed watching an episode of That Mitchell & Webb Look and this sketch came up

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rywVlfTtlMY

    She had been laughing her head off till then but she immediately clammed up and didn’t even raise a smile for the rest of the episode. A simple sketch was too much to take. She couldn’t handle any form of joke about religion and any discussion I tried to raise was viewed as an outright attack.

    It saddened me immensely but at least these experiences prepared me for when it all ended. Try as I might and as accommodating as I always was it just couldn’t work. It goes beyond being gentle, sometimes you have to tell them that they’re 100% right all the time or you risk them self-destructing and trying to take you with them.

    I hope the amazing woman she is underneath the brainwashing eventually escapes, I’ll be waiting till then.

    (And yes, she played Christian music all the time. And yes, it was – pardon the pun – godawful)

  • Nick Andrew

    Christians are used to a meandering plot and a conclusion which makes no sense.

  • Secular Stu

    Allow me to play devil’s advocate. 90% of everything is crap, so just by default the majority of Christian movies are going to be crap. They’ve become a niche genre, which means they have less money for production, which means they have lower production values, and can’t afford to pay for more talented screenwriters/actors.

    Violence, salty language, and depictions of lust are quite frankly lowbrow and generally unnecessary. Would anyone here describe Pixar’s films as “too gentle” or a creation of an “insulated, isolated reality”?

    Not only that, by “Christian” the author is likely describing a certain type of Christian movie, or the type of overtly Christian movie made today. If we are going to throw in Christian music, video games, and comedians, we’re getting further away from describing a particular niche drama, and discussing the artistic efforts of religious people related to their religious (Christian) beliefs. Wouldn’t it be unfair to exclude a movie like “The Chronicles of Narnia” from a discussion like this? How about “The Passion of Christ”? It would be hard to describe that film as too gentle or shying away from violence. (And then there are older Christian movies back when they were more mainstream: Ben Hur, The Ten Commandments, Jesus Christ Superstar, The Greatest Story Ever Hula’ed,…)

  • http://noadi.etsy.com Noadi

    @Secular Stu: I doubt you’ve been subjected to many films in this genre. Pixar films ARE more violent and with saltier language than most christian films. These are the folks who thought the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe wasn’t christian enough.

  • http://cramandballwell.com Jerry Ballwell

    Funny you should mention Christian comedians. I just did a post on my blog today about a Christian comedian I used to have cassettes of as a kid (before I became a non-theist), Mike Warnke.

    Warnke came to fame after writing a book called “The Satan Seller,” in which he claimed to be a former “high priest” in a “Satanist” coven, with 1,500 people under his command. He parlayed success from his book into a career as a touring comedian, and once sold more Christian records than anybody else in history. He is probably more responsible for the “Satanism” frenzy of the 80s and early 90s than any single person. He even advised police on “occult related” crimes. The West Memphis Three probably owe some of their misery to Warnke’s flame fanning.

    Warnke was proven to be a fraud, thanks to a very excellent piece of investigative journalism by a Christian magazine called Cornerstone (which remains their longest article ever). The article effectively ended Warnke’s reign as the most successful Christian comedian in the world, yet Warnke still stands by his ridiculous story. He is a horrible asshole liar who cheated and beat his previous wives, stole money, and manipulated all who were within his scope.

  • Dan W

    Have to agree with your post, Hemant. I can’t stand to listen to Christian music, partly because of the message and partly because it just sucks compared to other music genres. All the movies I’ve heard of that were specifically billed as Christian movies sound terrible. And the Christian video games? No way I’d want to play games like Left Behind: Eternal Forces or similar crappy games.

    Meanwhile, I find most non-religious comedians more funny in general than religious ones, when they’re making jokes about religion. Christians really need to work on the quality of their entertainment, because it just sucks.

  • http://cramandballwell.com Jerry Ballwell

    you know, I actually heard an explanation from my youth pastor as a teen about why Christian music isn’t as popular as secular music. He told us that Lucifer was the angel of music before he was cast out of heaven, and that’s why we should be suspicious of catchy music. Just another example of “sanctity” gone wrong.

  • Liz

    christian rock. christian metal. lol

  • ASD

    @Secular Stu: Ehhh…I don’t really count Chronicles of Narnia in the genre because a) it’s based off of a book, so there’s room for director/scriptwriter interpretations and b) that isn’t the intent of the movie. To me it falls under the fantasy genre. The Passion of Christ to me is the only well-made Christian movie that I’ve seen so far, though the gore was a little over the top I felt.

    Some of the problem is that they won’t watch or try to appreciate other movies, especially the award winners and the groundbreaking firsts, because they’re all violent and use salty language.
    If you don’t see what other people have done, it’s hard to get an idea of how to make a movie well. By watching other movies you can get a really good idea of how to write dialogue (and how not to), how and when and where to use special effects (and how not to) and lot of other things. If you can get a chance to look at DVD or Bluray extras you can get a lot of good pointers on makeup, costumes and stunts too.

    However, a bit chunk of the problem is that a lot of these movies – at least, from what I can tell of them, seeing as many are so obscure it’s hard to get any real information on them – are made by people who are Christians first and filmmakers second, who have no experience, and who don’t know anything about making a film. If you’re going to make a movie that you want to have a real impact, go to film school, take your time making it and getting it right, talk to people who’ve done this before if you can, and hire people who know what they’re doing as much as possible. (I can’t say much about actors though, some A-lister’s performances are pretty terrible too.)

    The vicar also has a point, self-censorship has never helped anyone.

  • Guy G

    If you mean a stand-up comedian who happens to be a Xian, then Welsh comic Milton Jones qualifies, although he doesn’t do religious jokes. He does puns.

    Tim Vine would fall into a similar category, being Christian and a stand-up who specialises in puns. Neither is overtly so, and you wouldn’t guess it from their acts.

    Slightly off topic, my favourite Milton Jones gag:

    I don’t like Italians, with their slanty little eyes.

    Oh no, wait, that’s italics.

  • http://hoverfrog.wordpress.com hoverFrog

    I thought that television and cinema were Satan’s tools or the way that godless secularists set out the atheist agenda to destroy religion. Or is it a Jewish or gay conspiracy. I forget what the latest revelation is with these things.

    Anyway why can’t they use “salty” language? They push the bounds of decency in Hell House (well more kick it over and stomp on its head) so surely making a movie with some realistic dialogue or mild innuendo would be no problem? Does that only count when they are scaring the shit out of children to “save their souls”?

  • Claudia

    To the Christian comedian subject, Jeff Allen comes to mind. He’s pretty funny, actually.

    As to the article, I agree with its general thrust. The problem is that their objective is not great art, it’s conversion, so the art is restricted on that basis. However if Michaelangelo could make great art that happened to be Christian, there’s no reason others can’t.

    But it doesn’t help that these days the best artists are unlikely to be Christians and highly unlikely to be evangelical Christians.

    Of course, even the author of the article is hobbled to a certain degree when he says:

    We must be ready to offer a viable alternative to today’s smutty nonsense. We have something genuine to offer that secularists can only dream of: Truth. Life in Christ feeds the hungry spirit and gives definition to life. No amount of existential claptrap will ever compete with the nourishing truth of Christ.

    I think this attitude is a part of the problem in terms of their strategy. They believe they have a magic ingredient, God. They think they have art-helper because they have the Truth (TM) and that this magic ingredient will make their art better than any silly film not made to glorify God. The problem of course is that they don’t have this magic ingredient but they make their art expecting it, so their art will fall short.

  • Venture Free

    The problem, I think, is the severe lack of funds. I mean, churches are reduced to begging for money every week. Worse, it seems the bigger the church is the more they have to beg! It’s a wonder that some pastors are even able to afford the fuel for their personal jets, let alone fund proper movie production.

  • Thegoodman

    I was once forced to watch the movie “Fireproof” starring the lovably murderable Kurt Cameron.

    This was my Vietnam. It was the worst 90+ minutes of my life. I was hoping something would fall through the ceiling and break my leg so I could get out of the room.

    My brother-in-law is an ultra holy roller and he insisted that we all watch this god awful excuse of a film as family on Christmas. It was the only time in my life I wished I was blind and deaf.

    The disgusting/funny part is; Fireproof is what many consider a “good” christian movie. God fucking help me if I have to watch a “bad” one.

  • Flah the Heretic Methodist

    The worst, absolute worst, movie I’ve ever seen was screened by my in-laws at a family movie night: Facing the Giants. Little underdog Xtian school builds a football team. The power or prayer converts abusive dads, gets a new truck for the coach, and of course allows the Good Xtian Team to beat the other guys. Of course, the other team is portrayed as eeeeville, even though they are also just high school kids trying to play ball.

    I tried to pull my kids away afterward to explain that this was no more than your average fantasy story. And infinitely more dangerous in its thinking. (“Jesus, take the wheel.” Noooo, woman, drive your damn car!!!

  • Hermes

    @Paul, while I don’t see the appeal in who you described, I do have a method for dealing with those who are easily offended as she was;

    * Is your god strong?

    The usual response to that is a flabbergasted “OF COURSE!”.

    * Then what could anyone say that would hurt it?

    If needed…

    * You don’t think that I’m more powerful than your god, or that I could harm your god? If you didn’t protest my comments about your god, do you think your god will be harmed?

  • Steve

    Winamp allows you to select “Christian Gangsta Rap” as genre. That always made me laugh.

  • SwedishSkinJer

    I spent the entirety of the article agreeing with him, and then in the final paragraphs he dropped this:

    We must be ready to offer a viable alternative to today’s smutty nonsense. We have something genuine to offer that secularists can only dream of: Truth. Life in Christ feeds the hungry spirit and gives definition to life. No amount of existential claptrap will ever compete with the nourishing truth of Christ.

    This is the attitude that will always ensure that Christian films remain a niche that, more often than not, simply preach to the choir. He will not be converting any “secularists” (and secularism is not strictly atheistic) with the “We have Truth and they do not, so let’s generalize how secularists live their lives!” nonsense.

  • SwedishSkinJer

    Well, the entirety of the preceding paragraphs would be more accurate, because in the end he does precisely what he accuses the Christian media of offering: sanctimonious, saccharine nonsense.

  • Claudia

    @Paul, I know its a little early for you to appreciate this, but in the long run you came out winning. Be thankful it ended before you were there for years, before marriage or (much worse) kids. You were willing to compromise, but she clearly was not. No woman (or man) is worth living a lie, or being forced to be less than yourself around a partner. Avoiding certain topics is one thing, but if religion is a central part of her life and she won’t abide anything but full agreement with her, she’s not who you need to be with.

    As for waiting until she’s free of her shackles, don’t. Think of it this way; you obviously can’t free her, she needs to free herself. Everyone I’ve read or heard from who came out of religious fundamentalism says that it was a long journey. She is, at most, at the start of that journey. Grieve and then move on with your life. IF she reflects on her beliefs and IF she can learn compromise or, even better, liberate herself from her faith and IF at that time you have not found an “amazing woman” who accepts you for you, then you can continue where you left off and live happily ever after. But that’s a lot of ifs to suspend your life over :-)

  • The Captain

    The problem is, that for Christians for some piece of art to be truly “Christian” or “family friendly” it has to not just be inoffensive to a 4 year old, but it has to be pro-Christ at all times. On long road trips here through the south I always see billboards for the “family friendly” radio stations (funny how they never actually say “Christian” on them, but usually have a fish somewhere on it why so coy about it?). Well one time with a dead ipod I thought I’d check it out. I mean “family friendly” means, just not Slayer right? No! Every single songs subject was about Jesus or god. No other topic was ever mentioned, brought up or reflected on outside the context of Christianity. The music itself was secondary too. Just awful bland “muzak” versions of many pop/alt genre’s that sounded like they where written by someone who really doesn’t listen to that type of music.

    The real “problem” is for many Christians popular culture can never be acceptable as long as it’s not screaming Jesus at all times. No matter how much a film or song lacks sex, violence, or foul language, if it’s not talking specifically about Christianity, its too “offensive” for them. What’s worse is they then complain that they are “outcast” in society, but that’s a self-fulfilling prophecy for them. They don’t want to be part of a society that doesn’t completely revolve around Jesus or god.

    Oh, and I also I like how the producer said “modern Christians cannot handle a simple kiss or rough language when God allowed Joshua to slaughter thousands behind the walls of Jericho”. Good to know he cool worshiping a mass murder. Perhaps he should think on that for a while.

  • The Captain

    A commenter on the articles site got me thinking. He mentioned how Christians where funding great art during the renaissance, and could do it again. But much renaissance art is beautiful depictions of christianity, that if produced today, would be condemned by the christian community. Look at how many times “christian” lawmakers cover over old state statues so you don’t see the breast (al la Ashcroft at the justice department). I mean in the Creation of Adam by Michelangelo you can see his penis, that would never fly today with them today.

    The problem with christian art may not be so much a “christian” problem, but may lie more at the root of the puritan version practiced here in the US. “Christians” can make good art, perhaps it’s just that “puritans” cannot.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000586562927 muggle

    Life is reduced to an after-school special with prayer thrown in for good measure.

    Well, I found that statement hilarious so does that make him a funny Christian comedian?

    Claudia, I never heard of Jeff Allen before but that clip was funny. However, how can you go wrong when dealing with teens? Still, that one joke about getting the prayers in on the way to church was freaking hilarious and only a Christian could have pulled it off.

    Patricia Heaton’s funny too though I don’t know if she does stand-up. But, yeah, it does seem we have to search to come up with them.

  • BamaPolyBiGuy1

    Why can’t Christians handle it? Might want to read Mark Twain’s The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg. He knew a long time ago what would happen if real temptation came along.

  • Non-Litigious Atheist

    You’ll never hear the phrase, “Be careful what you say. You might offend the atheists!”

    This coming from a guy who supported a resolution to ban the President from uttering the meaningless words ‘So Help Me God’ at his own inauguration and under his own free will.

    Nothing you can say will offend an atheist that can’t be settled by a nice Michael Newdow style lawsuit. :)

  • walkamungus

    The Captain makes an excellent point:

    …Christians were funding great art during the renaissance, and could do it again. But much renaissance art is beautiful depictions of christianity, that if produced today, would be condemned by the christian community….The problem with christian art may not be so much a “christian” problem, but may lie more at the root of the puritan version practiced here in the US. “Christians” can make good art, perhaps it’s just that “puritans” cannot.

    We have *centuries*, literally, of fantastically beautiful art, literature, and music, all inspired by the bible and often created for the church. (I love medieval settings for the mass.) Look how Milton spun the entirety of Paradise Lost out of a handful of verses in Genesis, and he’s going to confront you with doubt and uncertainty and struggling to do the right thing.

    I read one of the Left Behind books out of curiosity, and from a reader’s perspective the worst part was that there was no *real* tension–no doubt, no struggle. A guy’s wife isn’t a Christian? Well, he’s briefly sorry he won’t see her after the Rapture, but then it’s “Bye, hon!” Many Christians can’t seem to allow uncertainty or struggle–the whole foundation of dramatic tension–into their lives *at all*.

    My favorite movie about religion is Robert Duvall’s The Apostle.

  • https://obfuscatedreality.wordpress.com/ DemetriusOfPharos

    To paraphrase Hank Hill: Don’t you understand, you aren’t making Christianity better, you’re making movies worse!

  • http://www.meaningwithoutgodproject.blogspot.com Jeffrey A. Myers

    It’s strange to think that for centuries Christianity had an absolute lock on all of the highest cultural art forms. Paintings, music, plays, literature, all produced by or for the glory of Christendom.

    How far they’ve fallen!

  • JSug

    I was totally with him right up to this point:

    We have something genuine to offer that secularists can only dream of: Truth.

    That attitude is exactly what leads to the whole “preachy pig” situation he just spent several paragraphs complaining about.

  • Godless in Gomorrah

    It is a tough argument to think modern Christians cannot handle a simple kiss or rough language when God allowed Joshua to slaughter thousands behind the walls of Jericho.

    like, holy shit scoob.

    The plus side of this crazy thinking is we can look forward to a Christian version of 300 in the not so distant future.

  • Crickets

    You’ll never hear the phrase, “Be careful what you say. You might offend the atheists!”

    that’s not totally true, there are quite a few things that I’m offended by. antivaxxers, faith healers, ignorance of the inexcusable or willful variety in general.

    edited to add: that being said, I don’t swoon when such ignorance is portrayed in say, a film, or otherwise acknowledged as a part of reality… so, I get your point

  • Sinfanti

    Christian films don’t need gratuitous violence and sexual promiscuity at every opportunity… there’s already enough of that in the Bible.

  • Bleak_Infinitive

    Just thought I’d throw in a line. I’m a rather voracious consumer of music. When I was a Christian, I would sometimes feel bad about not listening to much religious music . After a while, I realized that commercial Christian “art” was utter shit and got over my angst. Then I left religion.

    A weird thing happened. I stumbled across a Finnish Christian band that actually cared about the art rather than the product. They’re now my favorite band.

    tl;dr version — I think the sorry state of Christian entertainment is mostly Sturgeon’s law. I can think of a few other religious artists or music that fall into “my-ears-aren’t-bleeding-from-the-beige” category: Spiritualized, some classical composers…

  • Demonhype

    Well, yes, Christianity had a lock on all the higher art forms. Unfortunately for them, that was only because they had the lock on society: The only people who had the dough to commission artwork were people invested in the status quo (the Church, and nobility whose power was intrinsically linked to religious authority), and there was all that nasty business of Inquisitions and such–any artwork or expressions whatsoever that praised something non-Church-approved tended to get its creator tortured and/or killed. So on one hand, if you don’t want to do Christian art you won’t make money and will either starve or will have to take up some other work. On the other hand, you don’t create artwork outside of the Church-approved specifications if you value your life.

    The reason all the good artists are not likely to be Christian/highly unlikely to be fundie Christian is because there are other outlets available and because the religious nuts no longer have the power to enforce a “CHRIST GETS PRAISE ONLY, IF JESUS NO LIKEY, YOU DIE” atmosphere. Once that was gone, the de facto social enforcement was all that was left, and once that inevitably eroded….well, you see where we are now. The fact is, Christianity really doesn’t lend itself to creativity or originality in the end. Nothing that depends on indoctrination, rote repetition, blind obedience, etc. ever can. At some point, you run out of material, and being prevented from exploring outside the “box” is a great creativity killer.

    I guess what I’m saying is that I don’t think Christianity was just so damned inspiring and beautiful that people praised it in artwork for its own sake. If Christianity deserves any credit for that Christian artwork, it is more for the repressive atmosphere it created that made it impossible to do anything else. You might as well credit masculinity for all the advances of human achievement, while leaving out the whole part where females were systematically (and often, violently) prevented from education or any form of self-empowerment/autonomy. (Which I have had some douchebags argue to me, BTW.)

    And yes, I know that there were also depictions of the Roman/Greek gods, but that really doesn’t much count as “non-Christian”. It was approved, it was not taken religiously but as a classical and metaphoric kind of thing, and those gods were often depicted within a Christian POV. (Example: Danae depicted as a whore, “giving it up”, as it were, for Zeus’s “gold”, in order to downplay her very interesting similarity with the Virgin Mary–Rembrandt was unique in depicting her sympathetically as an innocent girl being imprisoned from the outside world, reaching out to the shower of golden light as if it is a welcome bit of company, but from what I heard that was a real deviation from the more popular depiction.)

  • http://rejistania.wordpress.com Rejistania

    The Christian comedian I know is ‘ne bergische Jung but his program is very… regional to a spezific area of Germany. He is not only a catholic but actually working of the catholic church as deacon.

  • Jeff

    @walkamungus: Many Christians can’t seem to allow uncertainty or struggle–the whole foundation of dramatic tension–into their lives *at all*.

    That’s the crux, right there. That and pathologically low self-esteem comprise the foundation of their entire worldview.

  • walkamungus

    Demonhype is very right:

    I guess what I’m saying is that I don’t think Christianity was just so damned inspiring and beautiful that people praised it in artwork for its own sake. If Christianity deserves any credit for that Christian artwork, it is more for the repressive atmosphere it created that made it impossible to do anything else.

    I wanted to say something similar to this, but couldn’t get the words strung together right. Yes, artists did indeed follow the money (and try to stay on the good side of the church, at least until the Reformation); we’re lucky that some of them had the talent and ability to transcend the subject matter.

  • The Captain

    @Bleak_Infinitive

    I really wouldn’t call Spiritualized a “religious” band. Religion is just one of many topics the bands lyrics explore, and they often explore how religion and drugs mirror each other.

  • Bleak_Infinitive

    Very true — I just threw them in because of the gospel influence.

  • Kaitlin

    I went to a Christian school and when I was 7-10 (before I moved to Norway) we were shown movies like “Halloween Trick or Treat” about satanic rituals and how us as children dressing up asking for candy contributes to that. Also Kirk Cameron’s series of the end of times literally called “Left Behind”, and a few other screwed up documentaries on rituals, chopped off heads, the end of times, kids being murdered… You all probably got all this valuable information as children as well though… I’m talking about Calvary Chapel by the way, not some outlandish cult- right in most of our major cities.

  • Kate

    Well… you did ask.

    My parents made me see a Christian comedian named Ken Davis perform at our church when I was about ten. I don’t recall laughing once. :P


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