Hello, I’m a Hyphenated-American

Remember Dee Wampler, the Christian lawyer who is on a quest to have the phrase “IN GOD WE TRUST” posted in every City Hall in the state of Missouri?

Now, we know why he’s doing it:

“Especially with all the new people coming to the country that are hyphenated Americans, it’s important for them to know what our history and our culture and our tradition is,” he said.

Well, there’s a new euphemism for non-white people…

Wampler has no business telling my Indian-American hyphenated-American parents that they don’t know what America’s history and culture and traditions are like because they actually understand and respect the First Amendment.

If he knew about our country’s history, he’d understand the necessity for church/state separation.

(Thanks to David for the link)

  • OverlapingMagisteria

    Wait… their god is a buffalo?

  • Jon Peterson

    ^OverlapingMagesteria, thank you for that. Wasn’t rolling on the floor, but I did have an uncontrollable giggle fit. :P

  • Roxane

    Maybe because half of my lineage is what used to be called “Irish-American,” “hyphenated Americans” didn’t resonate as necessarily non-white with me. But there is a definite connotation of “people who aren’t as American as us, partly because we don’t want to let them assimilate.”

  • Christophe Thill

    Translation :
    Let’s teach all those Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and other newcomers who’s the boss here.

  • Anonymous

    From Reddit, under the title “The Founding Fathers are Tired of Your Bullshit”

    http://i.imgur.com/rN2F0.jpg

  • Danielle

    He doesn’t seem to know history all that well either, that shit was added in the 1950s.

  • http://twitter.com/mahlersoboes mahlersoboes

    Um…”In God We Trust” is our national motto?

    Someone needs to take a civics class. “E pluribus unum,” anyone?

    Some of the worst reporting I have ever seen. Gag me.

  • Daniel

    Mahlersoboes -

    Sadly, it is our national motto. Adopted in 1956 to fight those pinko commie lovers. (I’m paraphrasing)

    I’d also note that with his font selection, it’s actually “In GOD We Trust”. Amazed it’s not bolded and underlined too.

  • Shells

    I object to hyphenated-American designations, but not because I’m against any particular group or dislike immigrants-far from it.

    Being an American of Indian descent, or African descent, et cetera, is perfectly fine. I am an American of European descent. But I don’t call myself European-American, because my nationality is American and only American. I’m not loyal to wherever I came from, I’m loyal to the country of which I am a citizen.

    Many people who call themselves the hyphenated designations mean to convey that they are American, but have a particular descent, and I understand that. Some other times, though, they mean to separate themselves from America to some degree, or show a hyphenated allegiance. That’s why I make sure to call myself American, and nothing else.

    In short, there’s a difference between being, say, an Indian American, and an Indian-American. I think the former talks about heritage, and the latter talks about national allegiance.

  • Sarah

    Hyphenated Americans. Hmm. Nice touch on blanketed racisms, still holes in the approach. Someone should tell him that a blanket with holes is called an afghan. He should pick a blanket with a more American-sounding name.

  • Lost In The Bible Belt

    I’m American, He’s American,She’s American, Wouldn’t you like to be American too?

  • Mr Ed

    As a FedupwithyourreligiousBS-American I think we need a more inclusive motto.

  • TheBlackCat

    One thing that our Government teacher in high school made sure to emphasize is that native-born Americans generally know a lot less about our history and our government than immigrants. That is because immigrants are forced to take a lengthy and thorough immigration test on those subjects, a test that native-born Americans don’t need to take.

    He made us take one as part of the class (we didn’t get a grade on it, but we would automatically fail the class if we didn’t pass it eventually). I think out of a class of maybe 50 3 people passed the first time (including me), and not a single student one got all the questions right.

    This wasn’t your standard high-school class, either, it was a magnet program with pretty stringent test, prerequisite, and grade requirements.

  • Scout

    Overlapping Magisteria, you got there first, darn it. I’m just picturing some alien from outer space seeing that and assuming we worship “The Great Tatanka” in the sky.

  • http://seekingdesideratum.blogspot.com Hypatia

    Are they using public funds for these religious signs?

  • http://seekingdesideratum.blogspot.com Hypatia

    I love how this guy’s “legacy” is a laminated poster of a deified buffalo created in publisher.

  • keystothekid

    Someone should inform this guy of just how challenging it is to become an American citizen. I’m sure plenty of people who have to pass those tests know more about American history than many American born people.

  • Scott Hanley

    “Hyphenated American” isn’t a new phrase. It was used during WWI and the Red Scare of the 1920′s to refer to immigrants who still identified, in any degree, with their national origins.

    It’s not so much a racist term as a nativist term; it was freely used against Irish-Americans and Italian-Americans and just about anyone who was inadequately WASPish. I think that’s still true today. Although race makes a lot of people especially queasy, there’s a more general xenophobia that extends beyond race. Anything that seem foreign scares hell out of a lot of Americans these days. Including other white Americans who don’t think like they do.

  • Poyndexter

    “Well, there’s a new euphemism for non-white people…”

    I didn’t know that anyone didn’t know the term “hyphenated-American” or that it can refer to whites as well.

    “because they actually understand and respect the First Amendment.”

    The only part of the U.S. that anyone ever seems to care about, apart from jobs and welfare I mean, are the rights. No one seems to give a damn about the reigning culture for the past 200+ years. It’s always just “I know my rights, man!”

    It’s bad enough that we have too many homegrown grievance-class-Americans with that attitude, but we’ve opened the floodgates to self-entitled masses of ingrates who wish to impose their often retrograde cultures on us.

  • JB

    Wouldn’t Hyphenated-American also include those of Native American descent? So it isn’t just an issue of who was here first. This leads to the conclusion that everyone is a Hyphenated American, unless they don’t know their origin. This leaves only bastard children of unknown parentage, orphans left on doorsteps, and babies raised by wolves.

  • Erik

    “If he knew about our country’s history, he’d understand the necessity for church/state separation.”

    Well put, Mr. Mehta

  • Liokae

    I’m irked about the very closing comment, too. The USSC didn’t ‘say no’, the declined to hear it. Or, in common parlance, they turned pansy so they could ignore the issue. That’s not the same thing as “saying no”, by a long shot.

  • gsw

    I’m with Shells on this – someone whose grandparents emigrated to America should NOT refer to themselves as muslim-American or atheist-American, or African-America. How often do you hear Inuit-American after all?

    Since America (still) has free speech, it is of course their right, but it does show how deep their loyalty goes.

  • Bob

    The only part of the U.S. that anyone ever seems to care about, apart from jobs and welfare I mean, are the rights. No one seems to give a damn about the reigning culture for the past 200+ years. It’s always just “I know my rights, man!”

    It’s bad enough that we have too many homegrown grievance-class-Americans with that attitude, but we’ve opened the floodgates to self-entitled masses of ingrates who wish to impose their often retrograde cultures on us

    Watch where you’re pointing that thing, it might go off.

    I’m sorry if my ‘retrograde culture’ is spoiling your pristine White experience.

  • Jeebus

    I’m sorry if my ‘retrograde culture’ is spoiling your pristine White experience.

    Racist much?

  • stogoe

    @Jeebus:
    Wait, what? Poyndexter poops out a nativist tirade, Bob calls him on it, and your response is to chide Bob? Double you tee eff.

  • http://www.atheistrev.com vjack

    Maybe we should all start calling ourselves Atheist-Americans.

  • Arctic Ape

    Hyphenated American indeed, as opposed to Hymenopteran American a.k.a. WASP.


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