Why Does This Have to Be the New Yorker’s Cover?

This is the cover of the latest issue of the New Yorker:

Ok, I “get” the image. I know it’s not about Steve Jobs‘ faith and that it’s about his products’ omnipresence. I know the image is a “universally understood” icon of the afterlife. Still, does anyone else find it disrespectful that Jobs, a Buddhist (if anything at all), is being portrayed as a man making his way to the Pearly Gates of Christianity?

Xavier Lanier feels the same way:

Each religion has its own theory of what happens to us in the afterlife. Whatever your beliefs (or lack of religios beliefs) are, it’s an ultimate sign of disrespect to be memorialized in a manner which doesn’t reflect how you lived. You wouldn’t place a a cross over a Jew’s grave or hold a Catholic mass for an atheist, would you? The New Yorker most certainly wouldn’t dare depicting a deceased celebrity in any stage of [Islamic] rites unless its editors were 1000% sure he was a Muslim.

On a side note, it’s pretty goddamn annoying to see the St. Peter image trotted out in a cartoon every time someone famous dies. It’s the lazy cartoonist’s way to honor someone worthy of respect and it’s especially egregious when the deceased person believed a scenario like that would never happen in the first place.

Like when atheist comedian George Carlin died…

It’s not an insult. I know the cartoonists mean well. But surely they can come up with something better suited for the person they’re portraying.

(via Get Religion)

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • Zac

    Think about it. How could you work that into any other vision of the afterlife that a majority of people would understand?

    • Mark

      I’m with Zac. You’re not pandering to the dead guy. He’s dead, who cares? You’re trying to reach an audience of live people, the majority of who, if they are not Christian, they certainly are familiar with Christian symbols and beliefs. Thus, if you want to get a message across, one wants to use the method that the majority will understand, or the magazines are going to just sit there. We criticize religion for being overly sensitive about being made fun of or misrepresented; we are not better than them, and thus are not above it either. We are going to be misrepresented as long as the atheist community is at the margin, just like everyone else. Get the sand out of your vaginas and loosen up. It’s not a big deal.

      • Alima

        Dude. Stop using language that demeans women as an insult.

        • Sarah

          I’ve posted this once but did not post it as a reply and can’t seem to alter it. To put it in context of the original comment…
          Overreacting indicates the presence of a literal or metaphorical vagina. Alima puts my sentiments well. 

        • Rich Wilson

          Might be time to reclaim a word http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ss8uUbvprk

      • NorDog

        Yeah, what you got against sand?

      • Bob Becker

        You wrote: “We criticize religion for being overly sensitive about being made fun of… loosen up. It’s not a big deal.”

        I was thinking the same. Atheists often criticize Xians for being overly sensitive, of looking for reasons to take offense.   Seems to me getting bent out of shape over the New Yorker cover counts as the same : finding offense were none was either intended or implied.    

    • Ronlawhouston

      I agree with Zac.  What should they have done shown him as a reincarnated dog?

    • Anonymous

      Why is it necessary in to bring up any kind of afterlife in the first place?

      • NorDog

        I think the word is sentimentality, which works far better in a cartoon meant to make people feel good after a great loss than say, a cartoon of Jobs on a medical examiner’s slab.

        • Michael S

          Sentimentality with a religion’s worth of extra baggage tied to it.

          • Nordog

            The horror.  The horror.

  • galen

    its best to know the people ur cartooning about. the more accurate, the funnier the story i always say. 

  • Sajanas

    You know, its funny, I always thought of St. Peter being out there as a punishment… he can’t come inside until everyone else is already in, and he has to do this menial, degrading job instead of enjoying paradise. 

    That being said, I find the George Carlin comic more insulting… he was clearly an atheist, and even though its better than putting him in hell, its clearly trying to claim him for the cartoonists religion, rather than respecting his beliefs.

  • Timothy Rinehart

    Jobs was a self-described Buddhist. Doesn’t mean he actually WAS a Buddhist.

    • http://annainca.blogspot.com/ Anna

      No True Scotsman? If Jobs said he was a Buddhist, then surely he was a Buddhist.

      • ACN

        What if Jobs said he was a Buddhist but actually practiced ritual animal sacrifices in his basement to appease the Great Old Ones? Surely, this is not consistent with being a buddhist.

        Ridiculous, yes, and I’d say Timothy’s comment is still goofy since he presents no evidence to the contrary, but you don’t commit No True Scotsman just by saying someone’s religious label is hypocritical.

        • http://annainca.blogspot.com/ Anna

          Well, but who gets to decide these things? Religion is a matter of self-identification. I’m not sure whose job it is to police who gets to be called a “real” Buddhist, Christian, etc.

          • ACN

            Yeah, the “mostly self-identification” is certainly a fair point. It’s no one’s job to police such things, but I think that maybe groups should have some say in who they acknowledge as members? I don’t know, maybe I’m ascribing too much centralization, in general, to religious identification.

            Like, for example, if I said to you Anna:

            “hey I’m a christian! I believe in bringing wine to parties when it runs out, and being nice to each other, but screw that christ guy, I don’t know why anyone listens to those supernatural stories.”

            We generally acknowledge that if you’re a christian, applying that label to yourself should sort of mean that ascribe divinity to christ, right? In this case, I think you could rightly tell me that I’m closer to being an atheist than a christian because I disavow the central tenet of christianity. And that moreover, I’m being either unintentionally misleading or intentionally dishonest by describing myself as I have.

            You can see the parallels I’m striking at for Islam, Buddhism et al. 

            • http://annainca.blogspot.com/ Anna

              I think the problem is that these religions just aren’t centralized enough to enforce a standard. There’s no Buddhist or Christian in charge who lays down certain requirements and ejects people who don’t toe the line. Thus you have Christians all the way from hardline fundamentalists to ultra-progressives (like John Shelby Spong) who even question the divinity of Jesus.   

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EAIHLUU3JSTIB3D2OWHGYN5PHA Ingen

          Praying in public is inconsistent with being a Christian (as per Matthew 6:5 and onwards). Does that mean that there are no Christian priests?Worshipping Mohammed is forbidden by the Koran (hence why they can’t draw him). Does that mean that no Muslims are Muslims?

        • Michael S

          It’s an argument from ignorance.

  • Bob Becker

    H, you’re usually right on target. But this time, no. Chill.  It’s a harmless cartoon— St. Pete working on an IPad.   Made me chuckle.  That it’s some kind of stealth comment on Jobs and his beliefs [or yours or mine] about the afterlife, or an afterlife, or anything other than amusing cover art is highly unlikely.   Not worth even half a snit-fit.  The Carlin cartoon was different. That was saying something about Carlin’s morals. It was a swipe at Carlin.   But  the NYer cover  is not a swipe at Jobs or anything else.   Tribute more likely.  And funny.  Give it a rest.

    • poliltimmy

      Sorry but showing him being judged by st. peter is just as bad a swipe. It mocks who he was.

  • NorDog

    Well, not every cartoon can be as culturally sensitive as Stick-Figure-Jesus asking for nails in his feet so that his shoe stop falling off.  But still, how dare The New Yorker suggest that Jobs was so successful he cornered the digital market at the Pearly Gates.

    The fact is, New York is in America, and Amercia is still very much a part of Western culture, and Western culture has for centuries been influenced by Christianity.

    To be upset that certain images have become iconic after many centuries, and that people who make a living communicating visually would use those iconic images, seems a bit thin skinned to me.

    Heck, even the Apple logo/icon has biblical origins: An apple with a bite out of it.

    • Anonymous

      The apple logo isn’t a biblical reference. I read not long ago that the designer of the logo added the bite for scale purposes so it wouldn’t be mistaken for a cherry.

    • Anonymous

      By tradition, Jesus died _thousands_ of years ago, so it’s been a while.  To use Job’s image in making a mockery of Job’s beliefs the same week he died is just wrong.

      Also, can you point to the passage where it says the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil is an apple?  Popular culture may think it’s an apple, but to assert that it’s an apple isn’t biblical because the actual identity is simply not given in the story.

      • nordog

        Be that as it may, as an iconic/symbolic image, the apple with a bite out of it is, for many, a representation of the biblical story in question.  So instead of saying that it had biblical origins, I should have said that it does represent a biblical idea, which it does.

        Of course, like any symbolic image, it can represent more than one thing, as has been demonstrated here.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EAIHLUU3JSTIB3D2OWHGYN5PHA Ingen

          The apple in the logo is a reference to the Newton legend – discovery of gravity, great contribution to science and all that. Nothing to do with Adam or Eve (or Alan Turing, which many people believe).

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EAIHLUU3JSTIB3D2OWHGYN5PHA Ingen

          The apple in the logo is a reference to the Newton legend – discovery of gravity, great contribution to science and all that. Nothing to do with Adam or Eve (or Alan Turing, which many people believe).

          • Bob Becker

            Good grief, you see where this over-sensitivity to trivia gets us?  Into debates about the metaphysical and theological implications of Apple’s marketing icon. 

            Enough already.

            • NorDog

              LOL.  Good point.

    • Anonymous

      Some say the logo is a reference to Alan Turing, but that’s wrong . In fact, the bite was added so it wouldn’t be confused with other fruits

      A very early, very short-lived version of it also made an explicit reference to Isaac Newton and his apple tree

      • NorDog

        I’m not a computer guy, so could you tell me what the connection would be between the logo and Turing?  Newton is obvious, but why Turing?

        • ACN

          Turing was the father, in many ways, of computer science and he was thought to have committed suicide by eating a cyanide coated apple after he was convicted of indecent homosexual conduct and forced to submit to chemical castration. His crime was having consentual sex with a man, and letting this detail slip to the police as he reported a robbery. 

          There is a statue of him posed with an apple as the 3-way symbol of forbidden love, inspiration (via Newton),  and his death via suicide.

          • NorDog

            Belated thanks for the reply.

            • Rich Wilson

              It should also be noted that Turing was instrumental in breaking the German Enigma code, which certainly shortened the war.  Massive contribution to the world, met with massive persecution.  Terrible injustice.

            • Rich Wilson

              It should also be noted that Turing was instrumental in breaking the German Enigma code, which certainly shortened the war.  Massive contribution to the world, met with massive persecution.  Terrible injustice.

  • Sarah

    Overreacting indicates the presence of a literal or metaphorical vagina. Alima puts my sentiments well.

  • GARY GABBARD

    “You wouldn’t place a a cross over a Jew’s grave or hold a Catholic mass for an atheist, would you?”

    Interesting timing. An atheist friend of mine passed away on Sunday and his parents are having the mass on Friday. Definitely disrespectful, but what can you do? I’m not going to confront them after they lost their son so young and so suddenly.

  • GARY GABBARD

    “You wouldn’t place a a cross over a Jew’s grave or hold a Catholic mass for an atheist, would you?”

    Interesting timing. An atheist friend of mine passed away on Sunday and his parents are having the mass on Friday. Definitely disrespectful, but what can you do? I’m not going to confront them after they lost their son so young and so suddenly.

    • http://yetanotheratheist.com/ TerranRich

      That’s why I’m having some kind of document drawn up that says I don’t want any kind of religious ceremony when I die. Being indoctrinated into Catholicism was bad enough, but to have my lifeless carcass dragged out for everybody to see in some kind of macabre ritualistic ceremony… that just does’t appeal to me at all, and would be highly disrespectful of MY beliefs. If/When my parents die, I will have the greatest Catholic ceremony the world has ever known…but not for me, thanks.

      • Anonymous

        A while after I told my mom I’m an atheist, she called me and suggested she change her will to have one of her sisters do the arrangements for her funeral since she wants a full-on Catholic funeral.  Like I’m now too stupid to figure out how to do a religious funeral.  Heck, I sat at the diningroom table after my dad died, with my mom and her priest after he BLESSED the table as an alter so he could do grieving rights or some such thing for my mom.  I even read a passage from his blessed bible.  I think I can handle a funeral.  (Not that I want to any time soon!)

        • Rich Wilson

          My Grandmother was a Trekkie/Republican/personal-friend-of-Heinlein/brilliant/atheist.  I handled the logistics of her memorial, and my mother arranged for a pastor to speak.  Most of the family (like most American families) is Christian, and they did keep it low key.  Certainly not RC!

          But towards the end, I just felt like Grandma’s POV wasn’t being presented/respected.  So I got up and said a short piece about how Grandma enjoyed going to church with mom, but she was an atheist, and I felt that that needed to be acknowledged.

          One of my younger cousins (also an atheist) came up to me afterwards and said that it had never occurred to her that Grandma was an atheist, and wished she’d had more opportunity to talk to her about it.

          Greta’s point that we’re speaking to the lurkers really hit home.

    • http://yetanotheratheist.com/ TerranRich

      That’s why I’m having some kind of document drawn up that says I don’t want any kind of religious ceremony when I die. Being indoctrinated into Catholicism was bad enough, but to have my lifeless carcass dragged out for everybody to see in some kind of macabre ritualistic ceremony… that just does’t appeal to me at all, and would be highly disrespectful of MY beliefs. If/When my parents die, I will have the greatest Catholic ceremony the world has ever known…but not for me, thanks.

    • http://yetanotheratheist.com/ TerranRich

      That’s why I’m having some kind of document drawn up that says I don’t want any kind of religious ceremony when I die. Being indoctrinated into Catholicism was bad enough, but to have my lifeless carcass dragged out for everybody to see in some kind of macabre ritualistic ceremony… that just does’t appeal to me at all, and would be highly disrespectful of MY beliefs. If/When my parents die, I will have the greatest Catholic ceremony the world has ever known…but not for me, thanks.

    • http://yetanotheratheist.com/ TerranRich

      That’s why I’m having some kind of document drawn up that says I don’t want any kind of religious ceremony when I die. Being indoctrinated into Catholicism was bad enough, but to have my lifeless carcass dragged out for everybody to see in some kind of macabre ritualistic ceremony… that just does’t appeal to me at all, and would be highly disrespectful of MY beliefs. If/When my parents die, I will have the greatest Catholic ceremony the world has ever known…but not for me, thanks.

    • Bob Becker

      “I’m not going to confront them after they lost their son so young and so suddenly.”

      Kind of you, and the right thing to do.  The Mass isn’t for your friend. It’s for his parents.  Letting them grieve in their own way is the course of kindness. 

  • David C. Frier

    The Carlin cartoon was a horrific insult, by the way.

    • http://disienai.tumblr.com/ Semipermeable

      Yeah, he should be in space chilling out with the sun if anything.

      • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ Anonymous

        I kinda figured he was stuck on a roof somewhere…

    • http://disienai.tumblr.com/ Semipermeable

      Yeah, he should be in space chilling out with the sun if anything.

    • Pseudonym

      So was the Jobs one. The last place that he’d want to spend eternity is behind Gates.

      • Rich Wilson

        Sigh, that keyboard needed replacing anyway.

        The monitor, on the other hand…

      • Drew M.

        That was damned brilliant! I literally LOL’d.

      • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ Anonymous

        *LOL*

        *gasp*

        *choke*

        *coughing fit*

      • http://disienai.tumblr.com/ Semipermeable

        That was fantastic. :)

      • SphericalBunny

        Reminds me of another bad taste joke I heard – kinda ironic that the founder of Apple died of pancreatic cancer (PC).

        Also, a link worth reading for those that disapprove of homeopathy;
        http://www.skepticblog.org/2011/10/06/steve-jobs-succumbs-to-alternative-medicine/

  • poliltimmy

    Nowhere in the bible does it say the foe bidden fruit was an apple.

    • poliltimmy

      forbidden

    • poliltimmy

      forbidden

      • Michael S

        joe biden

    • poliltimmy

      forbidden

    • NorDog

      Of course, but the apple has become an icon for the story of the forbidden fruit.

      • poliltimmy

        The icon is a lie to support another lie.

  • http://www.facebook.com/AnonymousBoy Larry Meredith

    Yeah, really disrespectful. I’m sure Steve Jobs and Carlin were really offended.

    • poliltimmy

      No they were not. But what about those who loved him? His friends and family. What it is saying is your loved one, a buddist, must atone to the christian gatekeeper.

      • NorDog

        Atone to the gatekeeper?  Really?  I read it completely differently.  I thought Jobs was making a service call.

        Really though, I think you’re over reading the whole thing, but then, that’s your right of course.

  • http://disienai.tumblr.com/ Semipermeable

    Steve Jobs isn’t going in, he is just now head Tech support for all fictional, metaphysical, and parallel places of existence. 
    His hands are on his hips because this is the sixth time he’s had to come over to the pearly gates due to ‘grandpa’ trying to work the webcam. 

    …Probably trying to Skype with these folks: http://www.collegehumor.com/video/6607796/cute-old-couple-enjoy-webcam

  • Nicole S

    Eh. I get where you’re coming from, but at the same time, I just don’t think it’s that big of a deal. Especially when it comes to a “cartoon.” I fully support cartoons that mock religion and religious people, so it seems a bit silly to be upset about the opposite. 

  • Ian Reide

    Disrespectful. I am sure something more appropriate could have been thought of.

    • Bob Becker

      Far from disrespectful, I looked on it as a humorous tribute to Mr. Jobs and what he’d accomplished by  suggesting, tongue  very much in cheek, that  even heaven  is arming its staff with IPads.  

      • Michael S

        Still disrespectful, no matter what ignorance or laziness led to it.

  • http://twitter.com/TominousTone Tom Lawson

    That is a fictional representation of a fictional destination. I agree with others that it’s a cultural representation of America’s version of heaven. It certainly isn’t Christianity’s version of heaven.

  • Anonymous

    The Carlin thing is especially amusing considering his thoughts on the topic (relevant part from 3:30 on).

    • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ Anonymous

      Oooh, here, let me fix that URL.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5m2fmLdyDo

      • Anonymous

        OK that is just bizarre! I click the link and I go to a FA post, but when I click “edit” to correct the html link, I get the youtube video I had intended in the script. Jeez, my comment seems totally incoherent as stands.

        Thanks for the fix! :-)

  • Dan0

    He he he, I’m sure he has an app for that.

    No, I don´t think it’s disrespectful.
    It´s just a cartoon, a joke that speaks more of the character, personality, and work of the deceased than anything else.

    To read a religious commentary on such work is pointless and miss aimed: like PETA members getting mad at the ” a horse walks into a bar” joke, because implying alcohol drinking for horses promotes animal cruelty.

    Those kinds of cartoons are just “what if” scenarios with funny implications, nothing more.

    If we are to criticize such jokes, we might as well go after “The actor’s studio” and James Lipton, for every time he has done the Bernard Pivot questionnaire to a non-christian.

     
    Let’s not walk down that road; it’s better suited for the fundamentalists.
     

    As for the lack of creativity on the cartoonists part… well, even if it’s true (which I think it is) it’s hardly a point relevant to the discussion.

  • Anonymous

    Eh, the cartoons don’t bother me. It’s just a template joke that isn’t making any real religious point.

  • CW

    I am inclined to say that this illustration has nothing to do with disrespect, since (as Hemant has noted) it is not directed toward his religious affiliation. This is just a nod to popular symbolism, not unlike the old  scholar’s custom of invoking ancient Gods. We all have different means of paying our respects and sharing our observations. This is simply the author’s.

    It’s a neutral picture.

    • poliltimmy

      We will never get anywhere as long as someone that is supposed represent Atheist appease this blatant stab at non-christians. To me it says ‘see this is who you answer to after you die’.

  • http://annainca.blogspot.com/ Anna

    I can’t bring myself to get too worked up over this. It’s disrespectful, sure, but I’m more annoyed by the omnipresence of Christian afterlife mythology in popular culture. Even I, as an atheist little kid, learned all about heaven and hell and angels and devils by the time I was six years old, thanks to Disney cartoons. Of course I had no idea anyone thought those things were real, but that’s a different story. I think the abundance of images just feeds into people’s desire for an afterlife. Is it any wonder that people can’t seem to comprehend that death is the end when they’re treated to images like this all the time? If anything, it shows how much of an uphill battle atheists have. It’s not easy to get people to accept that death is final when everything they see and hear tells them that once they die, they’re going to wake up in another, better place.

  • Annie

    You know who I think would be really bothered by these cartoons?  Christians.  At least those that believe that only the most devout amongst them are going to end up in their celestial afterlife.  At first I thought the Carlin cartoon was disrespectful, but after further thought,  I think it’s brilliant.  The biggest cookie swayed in front of a believer’s face is heaven… and here they go and let an atheist in.

    • GregFromCos

      Steve Job’s death has been very interesting to watch play out on Facebook.  I still have many Christian friends, and it was interesting seeing so many Apple fans coming to terms with someone they respected going to their vision of “hell”.

      Had one friend say “RIP Steve Jobs”. He’s a preacher.  I’m generally pretty quiet with most on Facebook. But I really wanted to asked him if he believed that.

      I’d love to see American Atheists do an ad campaign that somehow focused on well respected people in American culture who are now in the Christian Hell. I think it would be very eye opening, and really push the button of the cognitive dissonance, that exists in even many fundamentalists about hell.

    • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ Anonymous

      I hadn’t thought about it like that — it’s brilliant!

  • MrPickwick

    Poor old Biorn shares Jobs and Carlin’s fate…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MV5w262XvCU

    • Michael S

      Wonderful video!

  • ACN

    The real crime is that it’s so damn kitschy.

  • http://www.facebook.com/melaniedawn.molinawood Melanie Dawn Molina Wood

    Good point. I really didn’t even think about that when I saw this cartoon yesterday: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150340210013608&set=a.190413228607.126393.180256858607&type=1&theater

    The Christian Pearly Gates image is so ingrained I didn’t even notice it.

    • Drew M.

      I snickered when I looked at that cartoon. Then when I started thinking about it, it looks like St. Peter cannot find Jobs’ name in the book, thus barring him from entry.

      I’m willing to bet that was not the cartoonist’s intentions, but it reminded me of how easy it is to find offense where none was intended.

  • Christina P.

    I’d have to side with those saying it’s largely harmless. Yes, it’s an overdone theme, but without St. Peter the gatekeeper and his infamous unwieldy book of names, the whole point is lost. I’m an atheist, and that being said, St. Peter is simply a mythical character. I’m certain we can all enjoy the humor in this cartoon without getting up in arms about it. Would a similar cartoon have been offensive if Santa Claus were using the iPad to streamline his naughty/nice list to determine Steve’s likelihood of getting a present? The only difference here is that one has to be deceased to visit St. Peter according to lore, and so the context must be considered.

    There are times to be outspoken and appalled at religious themes, and there are times to take them for what they are. If Mr. Jobs had been an outspoken and militant atheist such as Richard Dawkins, this would be a time for offense. However, Steve Jobs was simply a brilliant and driven man who created technology which brought us all out of keeping records in giant dusty tomes (or clunky box-like computers), and into the age of the iPad. If anything, from the artist’s (possibly Christian) perspective, this is a fitting homage to Mr. Jobs.

    The objections to drawing Jobs in a Christian themed cartoon remind me (in a lesser degree, of course,) of objections to drawing Mohammad for the sake of Islam beliefs. It feels petty, knee-jerk, and likely only serves to weaken future atheist arguments along the theme of ‘look at these guys totally freaking out over something harmless’.

    • Drew M.

      Very well said!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/John-A-Anderson/100000016895400 John A. Anderson

    As a True Christian(TM), I’m offended that the New Yorker would choose to display any graven image on its cover. Wait…Is that my photo over there, to the left? GET RID IF IT! I’m going to hell!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/John-A-Anderson/100000016895400 John A. Anderson

    As a True Christian(TM), I’m offended that the New Yorker would choose to display any graven image on its cover. Wait…Is that my photo over there, to the left? GET RID IF IT! I’m going to hell!

  • Susan Creamer

    Slow news day, Hemant? C’mon guys, chill out! We atheists can be such an overly sensitive and overly serious bunch sometimes. This is one of those times.

  • Susan Creamer

    Slow news day, Hemant? C’mon guys, chill out! We atheists can be such an overly sensitive and overly serious bunch sometimes. This is one of those times.

  • http://www.facebook.com/sam.mulvey Sam Mulvey

    The Jobs one doesn’t bother me too much.   He’s being turned into a new Edison, and I expect the same level of accuracy about Steve Jobs as I do with Thomas Edison. He was a vague hippy with a vaguely hippy spiritual stance, so this isn’t exactly out of line. Sure, it’s an expression of privilege, etc., but it’s not one I can get in a tizzy about.

    The Carlin one, who had very clear ideas about what he believed in, on the other hand… especially since the artist is using the lowest common denominator belief in the afterlife to chastise language usage.

  • http://disienai.tumblr.com/ Semipermeable

    What are you talking about?
    Clearly Steve Jobs is now a deity of technology, and the old farts in the Judeo-Christian sectors keep calling him up to figure out how to work these new fangled webcams and how to forward as many chain mails as possible.
    They are probably trying to Skype with their grandkids but Jesus is being a dick about installing decent WiFi.

    • Rich Wilson

      My town stopped putting on a July 4th celebration due to budget cuts, so the local mega-church stepped up.  Of course that means the program is infused with Evangelical Christianity.  Always get a kick out of how they go on about “Only in America, could a college dropout start his own company and grow it into Microsoft

  • http://www.facebook.com/AnonymousBoy Larry Meredith

    Steve Jobs was an asshole anyway. Why does nobody talk about that? The guy was a complete tool. I don’t know why we have to be so oversensitive and ultra respectful when someone dies. Remember people for who they were. Sugar coating it is insulting. Steve Jobs was not a good or nice person. He had good bankable ideas but he was a despicable human being.

  • Rich Wilson

    Here’s the correct Steve Jobs in Heaven cartoon

    http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ucomics.com/bor111014.gif

  • Rich Wilson

    Here’s the correct Steve Jobs in Heaven cartoon

    http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ucomics.com/bor111014.gif


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