Stop Thinking That God is the Answer to Everything

This video by DarkMatter2525 is completely depressing (and possibly NSFW), but the point is an important one. Religious people are conditioned to believe God is the answer to everything, no matter the outcome. And it’s an absolutely delusional way to think:

I can’t believe I used to reason that way. If I just missed getting into an accident, it was God’s will. If someone died in an accident, it was a part of God’s Master Plan. If I survived a surgery, I should be thanking God instead of the doctors. It’s a win-win situation for God no matter the outcome.

When God can never be wrong, we lose the ability to think rationally about any difficult situation.

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • Rb6k

    The sad thing is most of the people who will get to see this video already agree that people are foolish for basing every answer on Gods will. Those that still do will just shrug it off and continue to be ignorant.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LKTF6H5YXBEGHEFMRSOESS3KWU Advent Gred

      there may be a few, at some stage of learning, to whom it will be useful.  But yes there are limitations to so many of these videos and items that interest groups who already agree.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LKTF6H5YXBEGHEFMRSOESS3KWU Advent Gred

      there may be a few, at some stage of learning, to whom it will be useful.  But yes there are limitations to so many of these videos and items that interest groups who already agree.

  • Anonymous

    I’ve been saying for years that I want a gig like God’s. No matter how crappy my job performance would be, people would always find a way to spin it in my favor. And I wouldn’t even have to try to make myself look good!

    • Mike C. K.

      God’s done a fine job since the beginning.  It’s just all humans since Adam and Eve have done a crappy job, which over generations of crappy humanity results in a sewage of a world.    What we’ve done a good job at is not taking responsibility for our wrong decisions and blaming God for the consequences of our inability to crawl out of the gutter.  Look, the majority of us are bent towards mediocrity, if not worse.  So it’s not difficult to see why were left with such a mess.  Don’t hope for God to intervene, because the last time He did take things into His own hands He washed up the whole world in a flood.  Anyways, He promised to never do that again.  And I think He was saying in effect, from now on I’m generally keeping my hands off of your lives.  I gave you a mind and a free will.  Then God concluded in a in a fatherly way sort of like this, “Now use them and make me proud.  I believe in you.”  Man, it’s wildly crazy, but I think God actually is putting His faith in us.  And we keep dropping and fumbling the ball…       

      • tom

        I don’t know how you can possibly write that, except if you’re not actually thinking about what you’re writing.

        I agree with you insofar as humanity’s efforts to build a better world have been inefficient, wasteful and faltering, and harmed countless innocents, although you neglect to mention that the net result, for all the horrific suffering and death along the way, is to leave us, as a species, better off than when we started.

        However, when you proclaim that god’s done a “fine job” since the beginning, I don’t think you’re thinking very hard about what you’re saying.  All things considered, god’s alleged intervention has far worse collateral damage than just about anything we have done – and you yourself concede this when you say we shouldn’t hope for it, recalling the alleged great flood (ask yourself this: just exactly whose benefit was the flood supposed to be for?  Did the flood benefit humanity, or did the flood basically destroy humanity because god didn’t like it, couldn’t fix it, and wanted a new one?  Does destroying a problem even count as solving it?).  As described in the bible, God’s intervention is predominantly unimaginative, inefficient, inelegant and, above all, horrifically violent, usually with massive collateral damage to innocents.  Seriously, have you never read any biblical accounts of such things and not wondered if there were a better way of doing it?  How can you say mankind is so bad and god so good, based on our level of ability to fix things ourselves, when even your own descriptions portray god as being objectively worse at fixing our problems than we ever were?

        Were I to believe god exists, I’d say it was high time god take responsibility for his bad decisions, and asked our forgiveness for them.  Promising to never use the flood again, taking a hands off approach, letting us carry the ball – that’s everything but an admission that he is actually unable do it for us, and things like the flood were crude, fumbling, ill-considered mistakes.

      • Anonymous

        God’s done a fine job since the beginning.  It’s just all humans since
        Adam and Eve have done a crappy job, which over generations of crappy
        humanity results in a sewage of a world.    What we’ve done a good job
        at is not taking responsibility for our wrong decisions and blaming God
        for the consequences of our inability to crawl out of the gutter.

        Are you saying that, before he created Adam and Eve, God had no idea that humans would do a crappy job?  Or are you saying that the fact that we humans do a crappy job is part of God’s divine plan?

      • Anonymous

        You are proving the point here. You always give your god all the credit but never any of the blame. God is great and humans and wretched, broken, miserable creatures that can never do a good thing in their lives. Their only hope for something better is to die and go to heaven. Christianity at its core is profoundly anti-life and anti-human

        And your god is doing a terrible job. He sucks at management. Even if we just follow your silly mythology. First he places a tempting tree with ignorant humans who he knows will eat from it. Then he blames for his own mistake and throws them out. Then some time later humans have again screwed up for some reason and he just kills 99.9% of all life on Earth. Then a couple of thousand years later humans have screwed up in his eyes and the only way he can solve that is by staging a human sacrifice in a primitive, backwards place of world (not even Rome or China where this actually civilization). That’s the best your allegedly omnipotent god can do? Nah, he is simply incompetent. Or rather the storyteller is

      • http://twitter.com/enuma enuma

        No matter how badly humans have screwed up, we have never been so strapped for options that the only solution was to destroy 99.9999% of all life on earth.  Humanity has never failed that badly.

        Your supposedly all-powerful god can’t say the same.

      • http://twitter.com/enuma enuma

        No matter how badly humans have screwed up, we have never been so strapped for options that the only solution was to destroy 99.9999% of all life on earth.  Humanity has never failed that badly.

        Your supposedly all-powerful god can’t say the same.

    • M-36

      Kind of like being a weatherman! 

  • Anonymous

    I remember people telling me as a kid that an event was meant to be or Gods’s plan. I didn’t quite buy it but didn’t have the tools or knowledge or inclination to challenge them on it.

    Later, a religious friend’s cousin was in a bad accident, but survived generally unharmed. My friend told me he survive because it was Easter weekend. The was one of the first times I had ask, “Are you kidding me?”

    Darkmatter2525 does a good job of showing us how even a fictional god can’t fail.

    • Anonymous

      “God works in mysterious ways” is also a good way to shut down discussion

  • http://twitter.com/enuma enuma

    All the religions I have studied claim to have the answers to the same
    set of questions, but all of their competing supernatural explanations
    are equally devoid of any meaningful content. The reason you can
    explain the same phenomena by invoking Zeus or Yahweh is that neither
    answer really tells you anything, it just applies a veneer of agency to
    what is still an unknown.

    Accepting supernatural explanations is like
    thinking X is not a placeholder, but the actual answer to an algebra
    problem. Religion answers everything by explaining nothing.

    • Annie

      “Accepting supernatural explanations is like
      thinking X is not a placeholder, but the actual answer to an algebra
      problem.”

      This is such a fitting analogy!

  • Annie

    I was listening to an interview on NPR today… they were talking about Bobby Henline.  He is a wounded vet (lost his face in an explosion in Iraq) and was the only one in his group to survive.  He is now a comedian.  In the interview, he was talking about how, even though he wasn’t very religious beforehand, he knew he survived because god had big plans for him.  Maybe some would say this is a positive thing, as his idea that god saved him for a purpose has led him to do good things with his life, but I think it puts way too much pressure on survivors of any kind to think they were saved as part of some god’s master plan. 

    • ukeman

      Not only that, it apparently means God DIDN’T have any plans for the rest of his group. It seems to me an essentially selfish way to think, the old ‘everything revolves around me’ syndrome.

      • Annie

        Oh but he did!  He loved them so much more that he wanted them in heaven with him… NOW!  Funny, you would think a being that has been here since the beginning of time would show a little patience.  The logic, as Dark Matter illustrated so nicely, is incredibly flawed, but it is also a huge leap of faith.  So huge, it surprises me that more of the faithful don’t question it.

      • Anonymous

        Never mind that others died and he survived, thinking that the creator of the universe has any special interest in one person seems very narcissistic.

      • Anonymous

        Agreed! Whenever I hear the “god has big plans for me” after surviving something, I think “what about the other people? were they not good enough? Oh wait, that was part of god’s “master plan.”” 

        It is INCREDIBLY selfish way of thinking. “I am good enough to be the only one to survive a catastrophe because god has big plans for me.” What the heck?

        • Mike C. K.

          I don’t think God is impressed by anybody trying to impress Him by being good enough.     

          • Anonymous

            Thank you for being an advocate for Christianity :)

  • Anonymous

    By the way, the video that inspired this one (the talk by Seth at the Oklahoma convention) was pretty good. Lots of stuff we’ve heard before, but Seth’s a good speaker and puts humour into things.

  • Anonymous

    What question is “god” the answer to again?  Oh, any question.  That makes perfect sense.

    /sarcasm

  • Anonymous

    What a fucked up video.  Seems the religious have a positive answer for every one of those scenarios.

  • Ashton

    I didn’t know that you did used to think like that.   I didn’t think that Jains had a deity.  Or did you convert to something else for a while?

  • Lazarus Laptop Repair

    Somewhere between the Alpha and the Omega exist everything.

    “He who made kittens put snakes in the grass.”

    It’s all about perception.

  • AREN

    If God isn’t the answer to everything then who is? YOU…??!!


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