Video Game Quote of the Day

After the last post about video games, Angela emailed me with several quotes from Rift, a game I haven’t played (not too into MMOs myself). F

From the description she sent me, there are two groups: The religious who want to win the game by supernatural means and the non-religious who want to win via technical/mechanical might. The quotes she sent me all come from the Defiants, the non-religious group.

Here’s my favorite:

Fate? Destiny? Bah, let’s make some miracles with our own two hands!

I can totally get behind that. :)

Another that I simply cannot end this post without sharing:

I learned at a very young age that the world is full of people who are terrified by knowledge and the power it bestows to the individual. Freedom is to be seized by those with the courage to think for themselves.

I’m really enjoying this. Keep the quotes coming to lklalakla at gmail dot com.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Chris-Hibbard/100002227509156 Chris Hibbard

    Two of the greatest video game quotes ever came from Resident Evil on playstation 1.

    “Here’s a lockpick, it might be handy if YOU the master of unlocking, take it with you.”
    Barry Burton to Jill Valentine

    “You almost became a jill sandwich”
    Barry after rescuing jill from a collapsing ceiling trap.

  • Anonymous

    A lot of Japanese video games have pro-atheistic, kill false gods, or “think for yourself” type narratives. I think Western developers/publishers shy away from such ideas because they might create controversy and hurt their bottom line.

    • Tom

       Mostly, but not always.  Remember this?

      “God was a dream of good government.”

      “You will soon have your god, and you will make it with your own hands.”

      “I am a prototype of a much larger system.”

  • Drakk

    One of my personal favourites.

    Al Mualim: What is the Truth?Altaïr: We place faith in ourselves; we see the world the way it really is, and hope that, one day, all mankind might see the same.Al Mualim: What is the world, then?Altaïr: An illusion. One which we can either submit to; as most do, or transcend.Al Mualim: What is it to transcend?Altaïr: To recognize nothing is true, and everything is permitted.
    That laws arise, not from divinity, but reason. I understand now that
    our creed does not command us to be free; it commands us to be wise.Al Mualim: Do you see now why the Templars are a threat?Altaïr: Whereas we would dispel the illusion; they would use it to rule.Al Mualim: Yes. To reshape the world in an image more
    pleasing to them. That is why I sent you to steal their treasure. That
    is why I keep it locked away. And that is why you kill them. So long as
    even one survives, so to does their desire to create a new world
    order.

    Disclaimer: No, I do not personally advocate the killing of theists.

    • Drakk

      Dammit, that got hopelessly mangled. Sorry. Could I get it edited for line breaks?

      • Erik Cameron

        you can edit your own post

        put two lines between each paragraph to get formatting to work

  • http://www.facebook.com/alexis.d.ocady Alexis Dawn O’Cady

    Morrigan in Dragon Age: Origins has very strong opinions on religion, particularly when discussing it with Leliana, one of the other characters who used to serve in a Chantry (kind of like a church/monastery/nunnery thing…all the priests are female so I’m not sure what it counts as:P)

    A couple of favorites:

    Leliana: But this can’t all be an accident. Spirits, magic, all these wondrous things around us both dark and light. You know these things exist.Morrigan: The fact of their existence does not presuppose an intelligent design by some absentee father-figure.

    and 

    Leliana: Let me ask you this, then, Morrigan. What if there really was a Maker?Morrigan: Then I would wonder why He has abandoned His creation. It seems terribly irresponsible of Him.Leliana: He left us because we were determined to make our own way, even if we hurt outselves, and He could not bear to watch.Morrigan: But how do you know? You cannot ask Him this. Perhaps He has gone to a new creation elsewhere, and abandoned this as a dismal failure, best forgotten.Leliana: I do not need to know because I have faith. I believe in Him and feel His hope and His love.Morrigan: “Faith.” How quickly those who have no answers invoke that word.

    (That last one was long, but I really just love that whole exchange. So reminiscent of trying to discuss faith with believers.)

    • Ross

      Great game! The character Leliana is a devout theist, who claims to have received a vision of the Maker (this fictitious world’s God).  During one of the game’s quests, the player and his/her companions are halted by a powerful guardian, who reveals interesting facts about each of the player’s travelling companion’s history, including the fact that Leliana is lying about having recieved a vision from the Maker.

      There are many more interesting aspects of the game as well.  The society depicted is surprisingly egalitarian, with women popping up throughout the story in positions of power or authority, both good and bad and also showing up in the front lines of combat.  There is also an opportunity to have a romance with one or more of your traveling companions, two of whom are bisexual.

  • Erik Cameron

    I always loved the way that in Japan its okay to portray a god as a character in a videogame. There’s no restraint that makes divine beings a taboo subject.

    It’s great how they in games like Okami and Actraiser, the main characters are Ameratsu and God respectively.

    In the original Japanese Actraiser, you play as the Christian God and attempt to vanquish Satan. Unfortunately the western translation changes the names to avoid offending people which butchers the context.

    After the games ending, you go down and visit a temple where people once prayed to you for help. There is no one there worshiping you. Your angel companion postulates that
    “People may be most happy when not in need of help from their [god], or when they have forgotten [him].”

    In general, I like how many Japanese games incorporate pieces of the Christian Bible into their mythology, just like Westerners steal ideas from older pagan religions in their stories. There is a lot of good material there.

  • Michael

    In Final Fantasy X there are strong parallels with the dogmatic and corrupt catholic church when the “maestors” (the equivalent of cardinals/popes in the game) turn out to be using religion and the idea of sin to oppress the masses. Then the protagonists go on to expose this lie and literally kill Sin in the game (“Sin” is the name of a large monster in the game who literally oppresses the masses by causing random natural disasters). There’s a lot more to it than what I’ve described and it’s really deep and thought-provoking in how it plays out. Worth a look.

  • http://www.mitechtechnology.com/ Mitech Technology

    The best video game quotes of the day indeed. I enjoyed whatever you added in this post. It’s interesting and funny as well. Thanks for good sharing.

  • http://kinectdancegames.net/ Kevin Noble

    Why i can’t see Dance central 2 for Kinect Xbox 360?

  • http://www.videogameparadise.com/ Dustin Bowen

    Those are two very awesome quotes! Great Morning read!


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