David Niose’s Nonbeliever Nation is Available Today!

David Niose, the author of the just-released-today book Nonbeliever Nation, gets some love in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette:

David Niose (Rick Cinclair – Worcester Telegram & Gazette)

In his new book, “Nonbeliever Nation: The Rise of Secular Americans,” Mr. Niose explores the rising challenge of secular Americans — including humanists, agnostics, atheists and lapsed Christians — to the dominance of evangelical groups.

Mr. Niose, 49, said it’s important that nonbelievers organize, in order to become a potent force.

He added that it would be beneficial for the country to return to secularism, noting that there’s less crime, a more highly educated population and less teen pregnancy in western European nations where religion plays no role in policy.

“There’s no need for church-sponsored soup kitchens in much of Europe because the government provides an effective safety net for those in need,” said Mr. Niose.

Slight edit: The article wrongly says Niose is the President of the Secular Coalition for America. He’s actually the SCA’s Vice-President and President of the American Humanist Association.

Anyway, David spoke at the Secular Student Alliance conference earlier this month about the topics in his book and that talk is now available online:



About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • Simon

    David Niose will be speaking in Washington, DC this upcoming Sunday July 22. More details here: 
    http://www.centerforinquiry.net/dc/events/voices_of_reason-david_niose_nonbeliever_nation/

    PS Hemant, I love this new trend of writing blog posts about our speakers! :-)

  • Skizzle

    Uh oh, you mentioned a social safety net.  Prepare for the incoming libertarian shitstorm in 3…2…1…

  • http://wordsideasandthings.blogspot.com/ Garren

    From the article: “Secularism is broadly defined as skepticism of religion or as the belief that religious views should be excluded from civic affairs.”

    By using the same term to refer to both of these concepts, we’re equating the separation of church and state with the rejection of religion. We can’t ask people to support secularism (as separation) without asking them to support secularism (as skepticism about religion).

    And yes, this is a big problem. The Secular Coalition for America and the Secular Student Alliance both _need_ to change their names to stop sabotaging the idea of secularism (as separation). Or, if they’re ruined the word already, we need a new term to express the idea of secularism (as separation).  

  • Alan Christensen

    Rats, the end of the video is missing.

  • Iosue

    “There’s no need for church-sponsored soup kitchens in much of Europe because the government provides an effective safety net for those in need,” said Mr. Niose.

    Yes, THIS. 

    Karl Marx was correct to call religion the opium of the masses, but Marx also put the cart before the horse: getting rid of religion will not help lead a country toward socialism nor communism.  Instead, what has happened in Europe is that socialism renders religion IRRELEVANT. 

    • VorJack

      Actually, I think that was exactly Marx’s point.  Things snap into focus when you realize that Marx himself took opium for various pains.  Today we might say that religion is the Aspirin of the people: if helps ease the pain brought on by capitalism.


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