Faith Baptist Bible College on the Losing End of a Record-Shattering Basketball Performance

Last night, Jack Taylor absolutely crushed the single-game NCAA basketball scoring record. The Grinnell College player had 138 points in his DIII game.

One of the more interesting aspects of his record-breaking game is the fact that his team beat Faith Bible Baptist college along the way. It’s a school so religious, its website is faith.edu.

You have to wonder where God is when the team with “Bible” in its name loses — in spectacular fashion — to a college once ranked among the least religious schools in the country

In any case, even I feel bad for David Larson, one of the Faith Bible Baptist players. He scored a seriously-incredible 70 points in the same game, and (as they said on SportsCenter) it didn’t even warrant a highlight.

That is, unless you’re at a school that is used to spinning stories to suit your own needs. This is the image found on the basketball team’s website late last night:

Yes… the night was all about Larson. (In the article that image linked to, there’s one sentence at the very end that mentions Taylor’s accomplishment.)

Obviously, the story here is Taylor and what he did, but it would be fascinating to see some reporters talk about the faith aspect of the game.

By the way, the more you look into the kind of place Faith Bible Baptist is, the scarier it seems. Just a glance at their Student Handbook (PDF) is enough to make you realize how willing some students are to sign their lives over to school officials who want complete control over them.

Like when it comes to dating:

You’re forbidden from dating anyone other than Christians who have been saved. In other words, stay sheltered and remain with your own kind.

The list of acceptable music isn’t much better. You can’t even listen to Christian music if it “carries a prevalent ‘rock’ beat.” Yikes.

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • http://www.facebook.com/mvanroy Mike Van Roy

    That’s why I like the San Francisco teams. We beat the Saints and the Cardinals.

  • cet

    I disagree with your interpretation of “spin” within the school’s own
    article (which is much more of a quick “blurb” really). Here it is in
    its entirety:

    “Faith Baptist men’s basketball player David Larson
    had a record setting night this past Tuesday when he scored 70 points
    on 77% shooting in the Eagles contest with Grinnell College. Larson
    easily broke the old school record of 47 points set in 2007. Larson was a
    very efficient 34 for 44 from the field. Congratulations to Grinnell’s
    Jack Taylor who broke the NCAA scoring record with 138 points in the
    game.”

    Of course the school is going to highlight the
    achievements of its own players. That’s what schools and colleges do for
    their own teams. The site is not an unbiased news channel and I don’t
    think any reader should expect it to be.

    With that in mind, you
    could spin it the other way. There are 4 sentences in the piece. One is
    congratulating (not just mentioning) Jack Taylor on his scoring record.
    So you could say 25% of the article was devoted to a player on the other
    team.

    • brianmacker

      He beat a school record which is newsworthy and was the point of the article.

  • Drakk

    I don’t understand why the schools think they have the right to dictate their students’ private lives (well, they’re christian, so it makes sense-ish). But what – would they actually expel a student for dating an atheist/someone of another religion?

    • Stev84

      Yes. It has happened

    • brianmacker

      It’s not exclusive to Christians or other religions. Leftists in control of schools also think they have the right to dictate their students private lives to.

      • amycas

         Schools providing healthy food options is not deciding which foods students are allowed to eat at home. If they want unhealthy snack food then they can still bring that from home, and no child was ever expelled for eating a cupcake. Also, public schools are for minor students–college is more students have reached and/or are passed the age of majority. So, let’s see: ensuring that children eat healthy by providing healthy foods in the cafeteria compared to ensuring that adults cannot date the people they want and cannot have control of their own lives. Which one is more draconian?

        • brianmacker

          Here’s one example since you seem to be ignorant of these things.

          http://www.aolnews.com/2011/04/11/chicago-school-bans-bag-lunches-to-get-kids-to-eat-less-junk-foo/

          Your comment also Is confused on the matter of who is responsible for deciding their child’s diet. Hint: Not the government.

          Oh, leftists don’t restrict themselves to bag lunches. I guess you’ve never heard of a reeducation camp. At least leftists don’t force abortions on people any more, except for china.

        • brianmacker

          Oh, and leftists intrusions in private lives don’t end in grade school. Look at what they did with the Duke University Lacrosse team. Even after the stripper was discredited (actually isn’t she now a murderer too) the leftists wanted to control private consensual behavior regarding who pays who to take off what, and where.

          Don’t forget the attempts to ban salt, fats, etc. Plus speech and behavior codes that go way beyond any attempts to protect the rights of others.

      • Xeon2000

        Are you for real?

        • brianmacker

          Yes I’m for real. Read something other than the NYT once and a while. Even the Huffington post ran an article one could use as an example of this. That barely scratches the surface. Funny thing is that back in the early eighties me and my friends used to joke where leftists were going with the cigarette ban. We jokingly predicted they’d ban unhealthy foods next and we were right.

          http://www.aolnews.com/2011/04/11/chicago-school-bans-bag-lunches-to-get-kids-to-eat-less-junk-foo/

      • RobertoTheChi

        Having a choice of healthy food for kids in school is not ‘leftists’ trying to control them. This school sounds positively archaic.

  • Michael

    “Group dating is always encouraged and usually preferred”

    And they say polygamy is going out of fashion in these biblical institutions.

    • Anne

      Group dating is not a start of polygamy. Group dating is simply this, the couple is encouraged to hang out with other people in a group setting so as to help them not to fall to the temptations that are human nature. This does not mean all the time. It also helps them to not isolate themselves from others, and it helps to form life-long friendships in college even if the couple breaks up. Even kids in the secular world group date.

      • RobertoTheChi

        Thanks, Captain Obvious. Apparently you have zero sense of humor and have NO idea when someone is being sarcastic. *shakes head and walks away slowly*

        • brianmacker

          Maybe you are missing Anne’s sense of humor, which is that his comment wasn’t funny to her.

          • RobertoTheChi

            I highly doubt that I am missing any sense of humor in that comment.

            • brianmacker

              She doesn’t have to express a sense of humor to have one. For example, I don’t laugh at racist jokes. That’s in accordance with my sense of humor.

      • Michael

        But by their terms a guy going out with eight women is better than a couple. Something of an oversight in their attempt to moralise, assuming it isn’t really encouraging polygamy.

      • amycas

         In the beginning of my relationships, I don’t like to group date. That’s because the beginning is the time when I should be forming and strengthening my relationship with this person. Later, when that relationship is formed, I will introduce it to my other friend relationships. If they all get along that’s a good sign. Only then do I go on any sort of double date or “group date.”

    • Antinomian

      Group dating sounds like the start of an orgy to me..

  • http://www.facebook.com/usman.bello.125 Usman Bello

    I was wondering where Paul Westhead was coaching nowadays. 

  • Caroline Miller

     “Students may not date those who are married.” Wow, what’s going on at that school that they need to make that a rule? And didn’t “parking” go out of style after the ’50s?

    • brianmacker

      I guess they don’t hold father-daughter dances then. :)

      • Reginald Selkirk

         I hope not, those things are creepy.

    • amycas

       “And didn’t “parking” go out of style after the ’50s?”

      I’m pretty sure the attitude that colleges should be able to control the lives of the adult students who go to their school went out of style in the ’60′s–as did the fear of music with a “prevalent rock beat.”

      But of course, if you have nowhere else to go, parking is the answer ;-)

  • http://atheistlutheran.blogspot.com/ MargueriteF

    “While enrolled at Faith, students should refrain from listening to or performing rock, rap, country and western, new age, and jazz, as well as any ‘Christian’ music that borrows these styles.”

    Sounds like Christian elevator music is pretty much your only choice there *shudders*. They won’t even let a student listen to what they designate “contemporary Christian music,” presumably because it uses rock elements. Ugh.

  • RobertoTheChi

    If you read the beginning of the handbook, you’ll see where this twisted fuck talks about his wife and her beautiful horse who couldn’t be ‘broken’ so he had the horse put down. What a sick and twisted fuck. What sane person does that? And then writes about it in a student handbook?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504525766 Michael Harbour

    And yet, even at Grinnell (where my daughter attends), they have the “Center for Religion, Spirituality and Social Justice” – implying that social justice is linked to religion and spirituality and apparently ignoring how much social injustice is perpetrated by the religious.

    http://www.grinnell.edu/offices/studentaffairs/chaplain

    And Social Justice is a cornerstone of the school’s identity so this isn’t a small thing:
    http://www.grinnell.edu/offices/studentaffairs

    • Birdie1986

      I don’t think you can conclude that they ignore how much injustice is perpetrated by the religious.  I think you need to talk to your daughter a little more about what Grinnell is really like.  One of the cornerstones of the school is open dialogue about all issues.  Would it be better if they just ignored the contribution of religions to social justice just because of the contributions of religions to social injustice?

  • amycas

    The “prevalent rock beat” is actually a throw-back to a more racist view that certain kinds of music are evil. Usually, that is music that originated in the black community (such as the “rock beat”). They even try to drum up ridiculous stories of native Africans who have become Christian coming to American churches and seeing demons while the Christians played music with a “prevalent rock beat” because it reminded them of the music used in their tribe’s ceremonies. Of course, these stories are not true, and they’re racist to the core.

  • A3Kr0n

    Yes, group dating!

  • The Dread Pirate Rodgers

    “The list of acceptable music isn’t much better. You can’t even listen
    to Christian music if it “carries a prevalent ‘rock’ beat.” Yikes.”

    My parents thought about sending me to a Christian high school. It had the same rule, as well as not allowing ANY music your freshman year. Oh, and mandatory church attendance 3 nights plus Sunday morning. So happy they decided it was too expensive and I got to go to public school.

  • OneHodos

    @RobertoTheChi:disqus 
    I disagree with the school’s position on some of the issues raised as well, but your comments show a vitriol and lack of tolerance that I find much more disturbing. And if you can’t see that . . . you are much more clueless than the people you so flippantly ridicule.

  • TheExpatriate700

    What does this have to do with anything? Other than the fact that one of the schools was religious, why does it warrant mention on this blog?

    • Deven Kale

       Because Hemant thought it was worth mentioning on his own blog.

  • Keulan

    Fundie colleges all have these long lists of rules for every aspect of their students’ lives. In my daily life I break enough of their rules that I’d be kicked out of this college within a day or two. It makes me glad that I went to a college that allows its students to control their own lives like the adults that they are, rather than one like Faith Baptist Bible College which treats its students like they’re still children.

  • Robster

    Why on earth would a young person sign up with a whacko school like this? Oh I know, years of nonstop dogma indoctrination. They probably think it’s perfectly normal.

  • Gb

    Under
    your theory Christian schools should win every high school and college
    championship, a church softball team should beat the Yankees, and the Pope
    should be the greatest athlete of all time.

     

    The
    reality is that one school is a non-scholarship school where the players are
    there to become pastors and missionaries while the other is a scholarship
    school that full-court presses when they are up by nearly 100 in order to get
    notoriety.  

    • allein

      Maybe we just enjoy the irony of the folks who always insist that God is on their side losing, especially to a team that does not make such claims. No it’s not world-changing; it’s just kinda funny.

    • Birdie1986

      Gb – Grinnell does not give athletic scholarships.  I don’t know where you are getting your information.

  • brianmacker

    How naive of you. Leftist don’t restrict themselves to providing additional choices. They use force to deny options they don’t like. For example, checking bagged lunches to censor what parents pack for the kids lunch.

    • Deven Kale

       I’ve never heard of that being done, not anywhere. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s illegal to do so. If the school your kids go to are doing such a thing, I would recommend hiring a lawyer and taking them to task for it.

  • Birdie1986

    I just have to come on here to say “Woo hoo!!  Go Grinnell!!”  (It’s very rare that I get to cheer for any sort of sports-related story about my alma mater).

  • jim

    your blog is ignorant

    • Susan

      Response to Jim: Verbal aggression (“your blog is ignorant”) is unacceptable in any debate at a high intellectual level and it accomplishes nothing more than demonstrating that you are incapable of offering a well-reasoned counter-argument to whatever it is that displeases you. Please therefore replace your verbally aggressive single sentence by a logical argument, such as would be accepted in science, psychology, or some other relevant discipline, that demonstrates why something you find here is wrong and your argument will be duly considered.

    • Edward

      For Jim: Do you see how Susan responds to your comment in a mature and polite way? Had she given tit for tat, she would have said something like “And you’re an idiot,” which would have accomplished nothing. Please acquaint yourself with the psychological concept known as verbal aggression. You will find that you will win more friends, influence more people, and accomplish more in life if you refrain from being verbally aggressive.

  • David

    A little over four months after Jack Taylor of Grinnell College scored
    138 points to help his team defeat Faith Baptist Bible College’s in a basketball
    game, a reporter for The New York Times mentioned some interesting
    religious aspects of the victory (Samuel G. Freedman, “On Religion: A
    Basketball Blowout and Its Celebration Raise Theological Questions,” 6
    April 2013, p. A18).
    Two passages in the article are worthy of comment.
    “Jack
    Taylor, an evangelical Christian, attributed his achievement to divine
    intervention. [He] alluded to a parable about talents in Matthew 25[.]
    Mr. Taylor said of God: ‘He definitely multiplied my talents that night.
    His fingerprints were all over that game.’”
    Matthew 25:14-30 contains fourteen occurrences of the Greek noun talenton (plural talenta),
    which designates a certain Greek unit of currency, called a talent in English.
    Whereas the English word talent eventually
    acquired the additional meaning ‘natural ability’, as in “a person of
    many talents,” the Greek word has not. Taylor, who in all likelihood has
    no Greek and was thus probably reading
    an English translation of Matthew 25:14-30, therefore unjustifiedly
    read the meaning ‘natural ability’ into the Greek word and consequently
    misunderstood those verses.

    I am surprised, by the way, that Jews, Christians, and Muslims (at
    least) are certain not only of the existence of “God” (to my mind, the
    word is, at best, a misnomer for the laws of physics) but also that It
    has a gender and that Its gender is male.
    How
    do they know all that? Where is the empirical proof? And if “God” does
    exist and has a gender, could it not be female or some gender absent in
    humans? (Why should the two human genders be all the possibilities?).
    And
    if “God” has a gender, does It have primary and secondary sex
    characteristics? A sexual orientation? Sexual urges? Sexual urges that
    It tries to satisfy? An interest in sports? Specifically basketball?
    Such a passionate interest in seeing a certain basketball team win that
    It would (just temporarily?) endow a certain player with such skill that
    his team would win by a whopping 138 points? You mean to say that It
    plays favorites?
    Notice that once we remove
    the unproven anthropomorphism (“He”) and substitute “It” (which would
    logically be far more expectable of a supernatural force), “God” becomes
    cold and impersonal and therefore not appealing at all to the
    religious, who are looking for a warm,
    protective father figure. Methinks that the author of Genesis 1:27 (‘vayivra
    elohim et haadam betsalmo [...]” ‘God created man [meaning 'human
    beings'] in his own image [...]‘) got it backwards (read “vayivra haadam
    et elohim betsalmo” ‘Human beings [specifically males, more
    specifically male chauvinists] created God in their own image’).

    The second passage in the article worthy of comment concerns the belief
    on the part of certain people, quoted there, that if Grinnell’s team in
    general and Jack Taylor in particular had behaved on the basketball
    court in a truly Christian fashion, they would have played less
    aggressively and in that way not embarrassed the opposing team by
    trouncing it. For example, “What strikes me in this story [...] is that
    you
    have the unapologetic, brazen appeal to ‘Jesus’ right alongside the
    unrepentant quest to make a name for the school, the team and the
    player” (Amy Laura Hall, who teaches ethics in the School of Divinity at Duke University).
    Or, “Our focus is always to bringing glory to God [...]. If we’re in a
    game where our opponent is outmatched, I’ll look at it as a chance to
    give experience to guys who don’t always get to play. I’ll encourage
    them to play hard, but we’ll work on specific things that are weaknesses
    — working for a good shot, taking care of the ball — so you can limit
    the disparity in score. A lot of that has to do with our philosophy of
    faith and sports. We’re God-honoring in everything we do. We don’t want
    to embarrass anyone” (Brian Fincham, coach of Faith Baptist Bible
    College’s basketball team).


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