The Winner of the 2012 Bad Faith Award Is…

As mentioned by Hemant back in November, New Humanist runs a poll every year known as the “Bad Faith Awards.” Readers vote for the person (or group) who has done the best to show the very worst of his/her faith over the past year.

Well, the votes are finally in and the 2012 New Humanist Bad Faith Award goes to (drumroll please!)… Todd Akin!

Bad Faith Awards Results (via New Humanist)

Prince Charles and The Catholic Authorities of Mumbai (who went after Indian skeptic Sanal Edamaruku for exposing one of their lies) were both running close to Akin for a while but he ultimately pulled away from the pack to claim a well-deserved victory.

I’m sure you’re all familiar with Akin and his unconventional views of medical science and the female body, but it was the following statement uttered during an interview that clinched this year’s prize:

From what I understand from doctors, that’s really rare. If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. But let’s assume that maybe that didn’t work or something. I think there should be some punishment, but the punishment ought to be on the rapist and not attacking the child.

Akin later apologized, but the damage had already been done. Those comments ultimately cost him the race for the Senate seat in Missouri. It also perpetuated the notion of a so-called Republican “War on Women.” Who knows how many people were driven to vote for Barack Obama in the Presidential election because of the aftermath of this comment.

Akin is now in illustrious company as he joins such Bad Faith luminaries as Nadine Dorries, Pope Benedict XVI and Sarah Palin.

Nominations for 2013 are now open and will be for the next year. If you have any nominations over the course of it, all you have to do is make a case for that person via email to editor@newhumanist.org.uk.

About Mark Turner

Mark Turner was born and raised as a Catholic in the North East of England, UK. He attended two Catholic schools between the ages of five and sixteen. A product of a moderate Catholic upbringing and an early passion for science first resulted in religious apathy and by mid-teens outright disbelief.

@markdturner


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