I Wonder Who’s Gonna Win…

I’m going with the Bunny in round 3.

(via nakedpastor)

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • TSeeker

    A Happy Easter would demonstrate courage in conviction. Humor is often a shield and a dodge, like the class clown joking to cover up the fact that he didn’t study his lesson.

    • TheBlackCat13

      Right, because being part of the majority requires so much courage.

      Humor is often a way to bring attention to issues, like every single satirist in history, like political cartoon, and like most great comedians.

      • TSeeker

        So agnostics or atheists who become religious are by definition courageous? Does this mean religious people in Russia or any one of majority secular European nations are courageous And what of those who have switched beliefs within the traditions? Protestant to Catholic or vice versa? Are they then courageous? There seems to be a large number of courageous religious people based on your definitions.

        • TheBlackCat13

          So agnostics or atheists who become religious are by definition courageous?

          That would depend on their reasons and whether they had convictions to begin with. If they never really though about it before, then settled on something later, that isn’t really changing their convictions because there were no convictions to begin with. If they had strong feelings but caved under social pressure, then no, that is cowardice. If they had strong feelings but after a lot of though and introspection changed their views, then yes.

          Does this mean religious people in Russia or any one of majority secular European nations are courageous

          That depends on how the majority treats the minority. In Europe they bend over backwards to accommodate the religious in any way they can, so no.

          And what of those who have switched beliefs within the traditions? Protestant to Catholic or vice versa?

          That depends on exactly how important the difference between the two, and their identity as being one as opposed to the other, was to them. If they just consider it all Christian, then no.

          • http://www.flickr.com/photos/chidy/ chicago dyke

            becoming majority religious identifying is hardly a ‘brave’ act. it’s joining or rejoining the group with all the privileges and advantages, and leaving (and thereby implying a refutation of) an oppressed minority group.

            there are plenty of active religious people in europe right now. there are still official churches and faiths, and politically active religious organizations attempting to impose their belief systems on everyone. 300K French people recently turned out to oppose gay marriage in france, and have you tried being a Jew in Russia lately, or a journalist looking into corruption in the orthodox church? easy way to get killed. being a conservative orthodox? not too hard in Russia today.

    • Nate Frein

      Easter is a co-op of pagan spring festivals to celebrate the unsubstantiated account of a resurrection of a man who was brutally beaten and tortured and the ritual cannibalism inspired by the story.

      Yes. I studied the lesson. I studied all the lessons. I’m sorry you don’t like the answer I came up with.

      • TSeeker

        Ritual cannibalism? So we’re appealing to the same charges that the Romans used when they crushed down on the fledgling Christian religion now? It seems you’ve not studied at all. You’ve merely cherry picked whatever accounts justify a hatred already present. By the way, that argument would work wonders if it weren’t for the variety of practice in the global Christian tradition. I’m often amazed at how many rational critics are stunningly unaware of the varied traditions dating back to the beginning, the origins of the various practices and the doctrines upon which they were built. Again, I prefer to debate religious belief based on what really happened, rather than selectively interpreted accounts that routinely ignore larger bodies of evidence. Rational thought means the actual truth, not what I wish was true.

        • http://www.facebook.com/sandra.stott.5 Sandra Stott

          not going into this debate. But if the “T” in your name stands for truth, then why not study deeper, and look under the covers of the story of the ressurection? What really happened? Well, the Catholic church openly states that they took the Pagan beliefs and changed the names. These holy days were around way before Christianity was. Study it yourself.

          • Claude

            The Church adapted pagan festivals. But the Pharisees believed in resurrection, and the architect of Christianity Paul of Tarsus was, by his own admission, a former “zealous” Pharisee. Still, since Paul cites what are thought to be earlier sources, it seems the earliest Christians believed they had seen Jesus after he died.

            So I’m curious where the RCC admits the central tenet of its entire religion is cribbed from pagan sources. Although perhaps you mean just the feast days; it’s not clear from what you wrote.

        • Nate Frein

          If a person actually believes that the bread and wine transubstantiate into flesh and blood, then they are committing ritual cannibalism when they consume it.

        • baal

          “what really happened”
          Knowing what ‘really’ happened last week for video filmed events can be difficult (c.f. police abuse cases, they are rife with dispute about what the video means). Knowing what happened from written recorded events is, well, fraught.

    • C Peterson

      Humor is also an effective way to demonstrate absurd ideas in a way that dispassionate discourse might fail to do. And when it comes to absurd ideas, it doesn’t get much more extreme than the mythology behind Easter.

    • Rain

      Humor is often a shield and a dodge, like the class clown joking to cover up the fact that he didn’t study his lesson.

      Jesus was known to “clown around” sometimes too.

      http://freethoughtblogs.com/rodda/files/2013/03/E4.jpg

      • Rain

        And apparently he was a red-headed European or American too, lol.

  • http://twitter.com/docslacker MD

    Bunnies are much tastier.

    • TheBlackCat13

      I agree. I am having one for dinner tonight.

      • allein

        I’ve had rabbit once or twice; wasn’t crazy about it. I prefer grown-up baby chicks. With mashed potatoes and gravy.

    • Sids

      Have you ever tasted demi-god? I hear it’s divine. A billion or so Catholics can’t be wrong*.

      *Well ok, they can, but that’s not the point…

      • TheBlackCat13

        Yes, I have. It is pretty bland.

        • baal

          I must be like the only person who actually likes communion wafers. Sadly, I can’t justify showing up to a mass to get one.

      • http://twitter.com/docslacker MD

        Demigod crackers are too damn dry.

        • allein

          My church growing up gave us god in the form of real bread and grape juice. It was actually pretty good.

        • RobMcCune

          I know you’d swear they’d been left out in a basement or something for 2 or 3 days

    • http://www.facebook.com/sandra.stott.5 Sandra Stott

      rabbits are actually rather good for you. I have a link.

    • Nate Frein

      I’ve tried cooking rabbit a couple times, and I wasn’t impressed. It was a lot of bones and picking for not a whole lot of meat, and the flavor wasn’t anything to write home about.

      That said, I’m sure I would be much happier with rabbit cooked by someone with experience in cooking rabbit. And I’m probably spoiled by the grotesquely overgrown American chickens.

      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/chidy/ chicago dyke

        go to a french restaurant. a real one, with french chefs. order it there. it’s very good prepared correctly.

        • Nate Frein

          I will definitely keep that in mind. Thanks for the heads up!

      • onamission5

        Was it farm raised rabbit or wild caught? Farm raised is much meatier and less stringy, what with the not having to run from coyotes and all.
        Lightly braised in butter, wine and shallots, that’s the way to do it.

        • Nate Frein

          Not really sure which, actually. I’ll pay more attention next time.

          And I always love an excuse to use shallots.

  • TheBlackCat13

    I’m not sure about in the U.S., but here in Germany Google Play Movies is offering Religulous as part of their Easter movie sale.

  • C Peterson

    Let’s see… Easter Bunny brings cream filled chocolate eggs; Jesus brings stale crackers made out of his flesh. Which one are you going to invite in? Sounds like the competition is over before it even begins.

  • baal

    I see a vase instead of 2 faces but it’s a really ugly vase.

  • What Did I Just Read….?

    I’ve read quite a few of your posts now and all I can gather is that it is an attempt to make Christianity look stupid. I thought I was going to read some interesting posts, talking about all religions, so I’m very disappointed.

    • TheBlackCat13

      There are posts about other religions, but priority is given to the religion that has the largest impact on our society, and the largest impact on the lives of atheists in our society.

      And there is no attempt to make Christianity look stupid, it is just pointing out the weirdness that is inherent in the beliefs. Putting the holy animal of a Germanic pagan fertility goddess as the primary symbol of what is supposed to be the most important Christian holiday is pretty weird.

    • Drakk

      >> [...]an attempt to make Christianity look stupid.

      Attempt?


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