‘Zombie Jesus Day’ Sing-Along

I don’t care if I am weeks late on this, this family sing-along of “Zombie Jesus Day” is too cute not to post:

(Thanks to Ashley for the link!)

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Swashbuckler332 Joshua Gizelt

    You’re not late, at least, not for many… the Eastern Orthodox Church will be celebrating Zombie Jesus next Sunday.

  • Leiningen’s Ants

    Okay, imagine an emotion-strobe device on its highest setting, and it flashes between absolute cuteness and manic hilarity. Now aim it directly at your face. Twelve inches away maximum. I am crying and explosively puking rainbows~<3

  • Just Sayin…

    Why is it this is called “the Friendly Atheist site” again?

    Look up the Southern Poverty Law Center definition of hate groups and tell me if there are any atheist groups that fit.

    • Golfie98

      Just did and ……… Nope. SPLC seem to have this crazy notion that the hate they measure is directed at people not ideas. There’s something to think about while you wait for replies from anyone else who can be arsed.

    • Qp83

      I have no idea why Hermant calls this site “Friendly Atheist”, but are you suggesting this blog is unfriendly? Maybe you could list a few things that upset you? Otherwise I think it might be difficult to better oneself if nobody explains what’s bothering them.

      • allein

        Apparently “friendly” means not allowed to criticize anything, or have a sense of humor. Who knew?

    • TiltedHorizon

      The SPLC defines hate groups as those that “have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”

      When did being religious become an immutable characteristic?

      • FBG

        So – just to be clear – you’re saying that if Christians repudiate their entire belief system, you won’t hate or mock them?

        • TiltedHorizon

          I did not realize I spoke in riddles. If the statement, “I can be “judgmental” of all ideas”, means to you “hate or mock”, then you are an idiot. Is that clear?

    • Carmelita Spats

      You can be friendly, skeptical and FUNNY. Last time I checked, this is not the “Constipated Atheist” site…To wit: Jesus had a VERY bad weekend 2,000 years ago and is now in PARADISE. He is just FINE! Do you cry over things that happened even 15 years ago? Of course not and neither does Jesus. YOU, sir, are mocking Jesus by depicting him as so “DIPPED-IN-CONCRETE” that he can’t take a little humor without tattling off names to the SPLC and shoving all gigglers into Daddy’s eternal torture chambers. The Dead-Guy-On-A-Stick is OKAY with atheists busting a gut laughing at the stupidity of following rascal Yahweh’s “ingenious” plan of salvation. I was in Jerusalem last summer with my daughter and I explained to her that “this is the city where the first Halloween took place.” I even showed her the bible verse, “and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; and coming out of the graves after His resurrection, they went into the holy city and appeared to many.” (Matthew 27: 52-53). She laughed. Just sayin’.

      • http://profiles.google.com/uncoolmom Cary Whitman

        The Constipated Atheist by Carmelita Spats

        Wow, that is just dripping with awesomeness! You really need to write a book or start your own blog or something, just so you can use that title!

    • http://profiles.google.com/uncoolmom Cary Whitman

      Right…… So your “loving” Christian bible says you should stone non-believers but a silly song on YouTube is evidence of a hate crime?

  • Rwlawoffice

    I thought atheist parents did not indoctrinate their children with their beliefs or teach them to be judgmental of others?

    • Randomfactor

      But they DO indoctrinate their children with the belief that beliefs themselves are fair game.

    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/chidy/ chicago dyke

      cuts a little too close to home for ya, RW? heh, you should be afraid. you know, i used to be annoyed with zombie mania in the media, but now i’ve seen the bite light. if it helps kids ask the simple question “so, jeebus is a zombie?” it’s a trend i can get down with. the comparison with the brain eating part is also quite apt.

      • Rwlawoffice

        Not close at all.

        • Leiningen’s Ants

          Let me take a crack at it then.

          Indoctrination huh?

          Okay. OOOOKAY FINE. I’ll condense it:

          My family went to a unitarian universalist church. Probably the only one in Stockton California. And all church was was a boring speech, followed by my parents mingling with other parents, while me and a good friend or two hijacked sunday school. After we’d swiss cheesed the lesson plan, we went out, played some B-Ball (I was always tallest), threw dirtclods around; I mean, in general, it was fun. The guys in charge even let us empty out the old fire extinguishers for the new ones, ‘cuz they know those three kids are natural born scientists.

          One of those three had a lesbian mother in a committed relationship, and waited until the last month of her child’s Senior Year to come out and file for divorce. If I was in his shoes, I’d be pushing up daisies too.

          The other guy, he became a fireman and a successful tie-wearing married with kids guy. I try to keep up with him seeing as how our moms were hanging out in pregnancy classes or some such.

          And then there is me. Just lil’ ol’ truthspitting Leiningen.

          Oh, I didn’t mention why my family decided to go to church no longer:

          Five Year Old Me: “Why do we go to church?”

          The World: [Silence}
          ——–

          When I was eight I was slapped, more like hit, across the face because my answer to “why don’t you believe in god?” was “I’m too old to.”

          —————

          You want to know why atheists are so “heartless”…

          I want to know when you religious fucks are going to give it back.

          Fuck you wolflice.

          • FBG

            Huh. My mother’s best friend had her family broken up when her husband, my “uncle,” decided molesting their adult foster care patient wasn’t enough and came out of the closet when their oldest son was about 12. She told him that as long as he was discreet, she would prefer that they remain a family. He decided bringing guys home when the kids were home but she wasn’t was discreet enough. A super ugly divorce resulted during which he tried to take the kids and all the money. After that his lover molested my “cousin.” Messed him up pretty good for years.

            None of these people were religious. File this under: “People often suck.”

          • rwlawoffice

            I grew up in a very loving Christian home, so what is your point? that your home life sucked and your folks happen to go to a Unitarian church?

    • TiltedHorizon

      “I thought atheist parents did not….”

      Who stated otherwise?

      • Rwlawoffice

        I have had many arguments with folks here who claim that only Christians indoctrinate their children. I knew it was a crock then and this helps prove I was correct. As for the judgmental part, quite a few clim that only Christians ate judgmental. Another example of folks not practicing what they preach

        • Kengi

          Please provide a link to the conversation.

          • rwlawoffice

            I wish I knew how to do that. It was several conversations where the topics were Christian children.

        • TiltedHorizon

          I am one of the folks who claim that “I” don’t indoctrinate their children. (can’t speak for anyone else)

          I teach my son my son about Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and about non-belief. I teach him that what he chooses to believe ,or not, should be completely up to him, based on what he feels to be true. The only absolutes I “indoctrinate” is to thoroughly answer doubts and to be suspicious of anyone claiming certainty of what cannot be known.

          I’m also a foster parent, for these children, I take them to their respective churches, keep them in their respective faiths.

          • rwlawoffice

            That is very honorable.

        • baal

          ah, when I say I don’t indoctrinate my son, that’s right. I don’t have doctrine or theology that I’m pushing. I do push that he considers the impact of his actions on others but I don’t specify how he carry out the analysis or what to do about the outcome. He more or less comes up with something I can live with. Compare that with teaching kids that the man must be one version of manly with a subservient wife. It’s not the same thing.

        • Anna

          Robert, I really don’t think anyone has ever claimed that all atheist parents refrain from indoctrinating their children. I would say a majority do not, based on everything I’ve read on the topic, but there are always going to be outliers.

  • Bdole

    If Jesus were really supposed to have been a zombie that whole doubting Thomas scene would’ve gone down a whole lot differently.
    That’d be an Easter movie I’d really like to see.

  • Kengi

    Sure, Zombie Jesus gets the songs and praise all the time, but what about the hordes of other zombies that shambled around Jerusalem that same weekend? Jesus was just one of the many who participated in the Great Jewish Zombie Uprising of 33 A.D.

    OK, not every zombie can have top billing, but still…

  • Guest

    Happy Zombie Day!

  • Rain

    The ukulele is especially appropriate for Zombie Jesus Day because ukuleles scare the hell out of people almost as much as zombie Jesus. Very scary instrument.

  • FBG

    Nice. Teaching condescension to young kids who neither know the meaning of nor are able to spell the word. That ought to make them friends. Glad I send my kid to a Catholic school.

    • Anna

      What’s school got to do with anything? This looks like a father with his own kids. I don’t agree with making videos like this with young children, but their school doesn’t appear to be involved.

      Speaking of which, are your kids learning to accept LGBT people, atheists, and others who fall outside your church’s approval at Catholic school? What are your children taught about people who don’t believe in a god? I don’t think the answer to that question would be any less offensive to me than the “Zombie Jesus Day” song is to you.

      • FBG

        Do you think this propaganda is meant to stay in house? They are making a video and asking for it to be shared, after all. I choose to do what I can to keep my kid away from this.

        As to your second question, I guess we are both offended then. E pluribus unum. Wait, no.

        • Anna

          Of course the song was meant to be shared. All YouTube videos are meant to be shared. But I’m completely confused what school has to do with anything. What does “Glad I send my kids to Catholic school” mean in this context? That you hope your children never meet the little girls in the video?
          Unless you keep them in a completely segregated environment, your children are going to meet kids from different backgrounds. They’re going to meet children from atheist families and Buddhist families and Muslim families at Girl Scouts, Little League, swimming lessons, day camp, etc.
          I can understand not liking the video. I don’t particularly like the video because I think the children are too young to understand what they are singing, and I don’t agree with children being taught anti-religion or pro-religion songs. However, since you send your kids to Catholic school, you don’t have much of a leg to stand on when it comes to criticism. Your kids are being taught pro-religion songs and they’re not being given a choice about it, either.

          • FBG

            I don’t actually value diversity; I think it inherently leads to conflict and eventually violence.

            Yes, you have the right and the ability to mock and disagree with what I believe. Since I think that’s rude, and I don’t particularly like being around rude people, I choose to limit my (and my child’s) exposure to it.

            By sending him to a Catholic school and participating fully in our Catholic tradition, I am giving him what I can in terms of tribal identity. People need to be around others who share their beliefs, their holidays, their culture, their food, their traditions. It’s how humans connect and create trusting bonds, build social capital. It is much harder to build social capital with people you share none of the above with and almost impossible with people who are hostile towards you because of some ingrained portion of your identity.

            I don’t hate you; I am weary of diversity, and I do not view inclusion as a core value.

            • Anna

              And you’re perfectly free not to value diversity. That’s your right. You can keep your children only around Catholics if you want. You can send them to Catholic school and not allow them to form friendships with children from non-Catholic homes.

              But given all you’ve said here, you hardly have grounds for criticizing the family in the video! You’re doing exactly the same thing, only in reverse. In fact, you’re even more extreme. I doubt those two little girls attend an atheist school, simply because there aren’t any atheist schools. They must necessarily go to school with children whose parents practice various religions.

              By the way, I didn’t actually mention valuing diversity. I said that I want my kids to learn that people have diverse views. It doesn’t mean I will teach them to agree with the views, but children need to be informed. I consider it a matter of proper education. I wouldn’t want my kids to graduate from high school without knowing about the existence and basic beliefs of Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, etc. We live in a global society, and they are going to encounter people with those beliefs (if they haven’t already) in college or in the workforce.

              • FBG

                I am teaching my child to value his tradition, not how to mock and denigrate another faith tradition, like Hinduism. The first thing they taught us in our Intercultural Communications studies in University is to respect the beliefs of others, or at least, if you can’t respect them, to not criticize them. People do not separate their beliefs from their identities very well, and if you want to be on friendly terms with them, you have to accept them for who they are and what they believe and not try to shame or convert them.

                Now, personally I don’t believe that all beliefs or cultures are equal or equally valuable, but I understood when I lived as a minority in other cultures that the people I was living among were not interested in my criticisms of their ways and would only tolerate criticism minimally before they would begin to shun or abuse me. For the record, they were generally agnostic or atheist, whereas I was not.

                • Anna

                  Mocking is often considered rude, yes. I don’t personally mock Christian beliefs because I don’t like to be rude to people.

                  But I still think that what you are doing is worse than what this family is doing. That’s just my opinion, and I don’t know the family in the video. However, you have said outright that you don’t value diversity or inclusion and you don’t want your children around people who disagree with your beliefs. So that would mean no exposure to kids from other backgrounds. No friendships outside school or church, no Little League, no soccer teams, no Girl Scouts. Nothing, basically, that would contradict what you are teaching them. And what if your child grows up to want to form friendships or (heaven forbid) falls in love with a non-Catholic? What will happen then?

                  By the way, disagreement doesn’t necessarily entail mocking. I can disagree with someone without mocking them. I don’t know your background, but I’d be awfully curious where you lived. All the agnostic and atheist people you met shunned and abused you because…why exactly?

                • FBG

                  I lived in the former Soviet Union. And, no, generally I wasn’t abused or shunned because I understood the deal and kept my mouth shut about my beliefs.

                • Anna

                  Okay, well, now I’m confused. You said they shunned and abused you because you were critical “of their ways,” and they could only “tolerate criticism minimally.”

                  So how is what you did in the Soviet Union different from what the father in the video is doing? He’s being critical, and you were being critical. He’s indoctrinating his kids, and you’re now indoctrinating your kid. Sounds like you are two sides of the same coin.

                  By the way, abuse should never be tolerated, but I don’t think there’s anything wrong with not wanting to spend time with people who have only negative things to say. You don’t want to spend time with the family in the video, and your Soviet acquaintances didn’t want to spend time with you. I guess that’s the price that comes with honesty. Both sides are entitled not to want to hang out with unfriendly or disapproving people.

                • FBG

                  No, I WASN’T critical of my Soviet friends and their beliefs. I may have asked general questions about their customs, but I figured this was their culture, I was the outsider, I should just mind my own business. Which I did. I got along fine. I understood that if I had been critical, if I’d told them they were all wrong or forced my beliefs on them, they wouldn’t have socialized with me. So I didn’t do that.

                  As to indoctrinating, it’s natural to share with your kids what you think is important in life whether that’s reading, or sports, or jazz. I share my religion (and my cultural tradition) with my child because it’s important to me. It makes sense that you would not because you don’t value religion. The advice given in this thread, to let a child choose for himself what he wants to believe or explore is how I treat an activity I don’t particularly value, like sports. It doesn’t matter to me whether he prefers basketball to soccer, since I prefer neither.

                • Anna

                  Wait, so you just assumed that your atheist and agnostic friends would have abused and shunned you, but they didn’t actually do it? Now I’m even more confused, LOL.

                  But never mind. About indoctrination, I don’t agree with it, but I can tolerate the fact that you have a right to do it. However, my original comment was that you really don’t have a leg to stand on when it comes to criticism of this father. He taught his girls an anti-religion song, yes, but your child’s school teaches pro-religion songs. The school does a lot more than just teach songs, and your own personal parenting choices restrict your child even further.

                  Which is fine as far as it goes, but let’s not pretend that the school or the church doesn’t teach critical things, too. My boyfriend went to Catholic elementary school and grew up singing a song about how people without God “walk in darkness” but people with God “walk in the light.”

                • Anna

                  Also, you seem to assume that I don’t feel as strongly about atheism as you do about religion. I can assure you that I do, but I still think it is wrong to indoctrinate children. Young children are naturally credulous and will accept anything you tell them. I don’t think it is right to tell them that gods are real or not real before they are even intellectually capable of understanding the concept of a deity.

              • FBG

                I am teaching my child to value his tradition, not how to mock and denigrate another faith tradition, like Hinduism. The first thing they taught us in our Intercultural Communications studies in University is to respect the beliefs of others, or at least, if you can’t respect them, to not criticize them. People do not separate their beliefs from their identities very well, and if you want to be on friendly terms with them, you have to accept them for who they are and what they believe and not try to shame or convert them.

                Now, personally I don’t believe that all beliefs or cultures are equal or equally valuable, but I understood when I lived as a minority in other cultures that the people I was living among were not interested in my criticisms of their ways and would only tolerate criticism minimally before they would begin to shun or abuse me. For the record, they were generally agnostic or atheist, whereas I was not.

    • Dez

      The idea that a man died and then started walking around after 3 days is not worth taken seriously. People believe in Bigfoot too, it doesn’t mean we have to respect such ridiculous beliefs. They should be mocked.

      • rwlawoffice

        Because you don’t believe in the resurrection of Christ you have the right to mock other people’s faith? so much for the tolerance that atheists always talk about. I am not saying that because billions belief in it it is therefore correct (so don’t say that I am arguing the point by majority) but because so many do believe, did you ever stop to think that maybe it is the few atheists (at least percentage wise) that missed something?

        • Bdole

          Lots of people believe in strange things. Should we tiptoe around them ALL out of respect? Have you ever seen a group photo of Raelians? (actually, don’t google it)

          Or can we say, “Listen man I respect you as a person, but you believe some very odd stuff.”

          There are lots of sincerely held beliefs that, to the unitiated, are simply hilarious. I’ll play the odds and assume you’re not Mormon. There’s a lot of comedic potential in the sacred underwear, their concept of the afterlife (I get my own planet!), the supernatural goggles, golden plates, Jesus in America, and on and on. Even if you have A faith, does it really prevent you from seeing the ridiculousness of other people’s? How about sacred cows, gods with elephant heads or multiple arms?

          btw – I didn’t care for the video. I much preferred the one with the religions of the world with that little girl saying “that doesn’t make sense!”

        • Anna

          I don’t like the video, but of course people have the right to mock other people’s faith. That’s part of living in a free society. Now, you can consider them rude if they do so, but it has nothing to do with not being tolerant. Tolerance means accepting the fact that people have different views. It doesn’t mean paying those views deference or respect.

          Tolerance is the bare minimum necessary for living in a pluralistic country. You yourself tolerate LGBT people, but you don’t accept them, agree with their relationships, or go out of your way to say nice things about them. Some atheists might feel the same way about Christians. We can tolerate their existence, but we don’t like what they believe and aren’t going to refrain from criticizing, condemning, and/or mocking their beliefs.

        • Dez

          It’s okay to believe in whatever you want, but that does not prevent you from being mocked when you believe in something that defies reality. Especially if you believe that a man can come back to life after 3 days, aliens abducted you, or there is a loch ness monster. Until you can prove that it actually happened, it’s free to be made fun of like believers of bigfoot.

      • Dez

        It’s okay to believe in whatever you want, but that does not prevent you from being mocked when you believe in something that defies reality. Especially if you believe that a man can come back to life after 3 days, aliens abducted you, or there is a loch ness monster. Until you can prove that it actually happened, it’s free to be made fun of.

  • Priscilla Parkerq

    Too cute. Favorite Easter song now.

  • http://twitter.com/gojirama Jenna Carodiskey

    Dude, Jesus is a lich, not a zombie.

  • Bill

    Zoe’s chipmonk sound at the end floored me…LOL!

  • Brian Morgan

    Love the title.


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