Members of Congress Voice Support for National Day of Reason

Well, two of them, anyway.

Reps. Michael Honda and Eleanor Holmes Norton

Rep. Michael Honda (D-CA) recently declared his support for the National Day of Reason into the Congressional record (PDF):

I rise today to recognize Thursday, May 2, 2013 as the National Day of Reason. The National Day of Reason celebrates the application of reason and the positive impact it has had on humanity. It is also an opportunity to reaffirm the Constitutional separation of religion and government.

I have the privilege of representing Silicon Valley, where every day scientists and engineers employ the scientific method and apply reason to develop innovative technologies that help advance humanity. The application of reason, more than any other means, has proven to offer hope for human survival upon Earth, improving conditions within the universe, and cultivating intelligent, moral and ethical interactions among people and their environments.

Our Founding Fathers based the Constitution of the United States, the basic document governing the affairs of people within the United States, upon philosophical principles that have their origins in the historical Age of Reason. It is important that on the National Day of Reason, we take time to remember and celebrate this history, including the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of religion and freedom from the imposition of religion by the state. Our nation’s founders knew that the best way to protect religious freedom was to keep the government separate from religion.

The National Day of Reason is also a time to continue the effort our Founding Fathers began to form a more perfect union. Every year, events such as food drives and blood drives are held on this day in which Americans help their fellow citizens and our nation as a whole. These community service events are
just some of the many ways Americans will be working to help those in need on the Day of Reason and throughout the year.

I encourage all citizens, residents and visitors to join in observing this day and focusing upon the employment of reason, critical thought, the scientific method, and free inquiry to the resolution of human problems and for the welfare of human kind.

Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) issued a similar statement:

“I encourage all citizens to join in observing this day and focusing upon the employment of reason, critical thought, the scientific method, and free inquiry to the resolution of human problems for the welfare of humanity,”

Last year, Rep. Pete Stark recognized the Day of Reason on the floor of Congress, but with his loss in the last election, it’s good to know there are still a couple of representatives out there unafraid to support such a relatively simple proclamation.

(via National Day of Reason)

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • Kalex

    I just want to make it clear, Eleanor Holmes Norton is not a “Rep.” – she has no vote in Congress. She is officially called a “delegate.” DC statehood now!!!

    • http://www.facebook.com/Kukai.Aoki Austin Aycock

      Well, actually Kalex, she is the representative of D.C., and as such can have Rep as a title, regardless of her delegate non-voting status.

  • Free

    “Our Founding Fathers based the Constitution of the United States, the basic document governing the affairs of people within the United States, upon philosophical principles that have their origins in the historical Age of Reason.”

    Oops! Gets sticky at this junction. Religion promotes philosophical principles not scientific. If they are basing what we are interpreting the historical Age of Reason in a positive light here, then we are essentially saying that the principles of religion are rooted in historical logic. It is thus logical to consider the religious principles of our Founding Fathers as it pertains to their interpretation of the Constitution and therefore not seek to remove their religious and philosophical connotations from their intent. You can remove the enforcement of religion from people but can not remove their innate sense of worship.


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