Kentucky State Representatives Visit the Creation Museum

When someone says the Creation Museum is “educational,” it’s depressing.

When five Kentucky state representatives (all Republican) say the Creation Museum is “educational,” it’s downright frightening.

Reps. Kim King, Bart Rowland, Tim Moore, C.B. Embry, and Mike Harmon were all present for opening day of the museum’s zip line attraction, as we learned through King’s Facebook page:

We had a wonderful time at the Creation Museum, could easily spend 2-3 days there. There are so many interesting, fun and educational activities for families. The zip-line feature opened today. Our friends, Mike Harmon and Lynn Young Harmon were the first folks to enjoy this thrilling activity. I highly recommend you plan a visit soon. Beautiful place; we’ll definitely go back!!

If this were purely economical — there’s a business in town that’s bringing in new customers — I would understand. But to say that the museum is educational and a place that families should visit? That suggests that these representatives care little about what children in their state learn.

They’d rather promote a religious fantasy than encourage the pursuit of actual science.

Elected officials, even Republicans from Kentucky, should know better.

(Thanks to Joshua for the link!)

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.

  • C Peterson

    I’m sure it was educational. For example, they all learned the word “dinosaur”, which means that five state representatives now know one three-syllable word… a significant boost in their literacy.

    • Michael W Busch

      It is not necessary to falsely insult the legislators (you can count the number of high-syllable words in King’s advertisement) or the rest of the audience of the Creation Museum. Most of them are entirely literate.

      What they are is offensively ignorant of science. That is enough of an insult for anyone.

      • C Peterson

        Actually, they are idiots.

        • Michael W Busch

          No. They are just ignorant and wrong, and well practiced in the cognitive biases of motivated reasoning.

          • Art_Vandelay

            Or they’re just pandering to their voting base.

            • Michael W Busch

              Fair point.

          • Hat Stealer

            You know, I’ve met people who thought that Avatar: The Last Airbender was racist because Aang wasn’t asian enough, but I’ve never known anyone who was so politically correct that they think the insult “idiot” is offensive to stupid people. You’re taking things to an extreme here.

            There’s a simple word that can describe people who are “ignorant and wrong, and well practiced in the cognitive biases of motivated reasoning.” That word is “idiot.”

        • Carmelita Spats

          You are not supposed to use the word “idiot” because it’s ableist language. You can, however, repeat what my neighbor likes to holler, “they don’t have enough sense to pour piss out of a boot if the directions were written on the heel.” I’ve told him that he’s so short he has to stand on a box to kick a duck in the ass. I’m not 100% sure if this counts as ableist language but I will check.The trouble ain’t that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain’t distributed right.

          • Rodney Barnes

            You sir, are a wordsmith! Pure genius!

          • duke_of_omnium

            Can we at least say, “they have the intellectual depth of a prune danish” or does that insult baked goods?

          • VCP

            You give them too much credit. The full phrase is “They don’t have enough sense to pour piss out of a boot if the directions were written on the heel and with a hole in the toe.”

      • Guest

        STFU MWB!! No, they are offensive in many regards not JUST that they are “offensively ignorant of science”!!! The radical ignorance that these assholes perpetuate in children is criminal. And all in the name of a fucking god and book that in (their so-goddamned) minds is the truth. Fuck. How disturbing; how crazy; how unbelievable.

        Here’s the deal … I call on all persons of reason, skeptics, atheists, free-thinkers and the non-religious to draw a line. Draw it here and draw it NOW!

        There is no intellectual argument. There is no “two sides” to this religious madness. So, shut the fuck up MW Busch!

      • usclat

        STFU MWB!! No, they are offensive in many regards not JUST that they are “offensively ignorant of science”!!! The radical ignorance that these assholes perpetuate in children is criminal. And all in the name of a fucking god and book that in (their so-goddamned) minds is the truth. Fuck. How disturbing; how crazy; how unbelievable.

        Here’s the deal … I call on all persons of reason, skeptics, atheists, free-thinkers and the non-religious to draw a line. Draw it here and draw it NOW!

        There is no intellectual argument. There are no “two sides” to this religious madness. So, shut the fuck up MW Busch!

        • Michael W Busch

          I never said they were right about anything – they aren’t (Have you confused me for a creationist? That would be a first…)

          I merely say that they should not be called “idiots” or any other inapplicable insult. As you have said quite eloquently, there are very many insults that do apply to them. Their ignorance of science is simply the most immediately relevant.

    • Regina Carol Moore

      This is an excellent comment and very very amusing. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise!

  • observer

    I don’t get the point of the creation museums. I mean, don’t we already “know” about God and his work? Not to mention that the Bible, which is (supposedly) unchanging, isn’t really going to tell you anything new. What the hell is the creation “museum” going to tell you that you wouldn’t know already?

    • C Peterson

      Lots of models and pictures lets them get their message across to illiterates and semi-literates, which is their primary audience.

    • Michael W Busch

      Nothing. Which is why they have to add entirely unrelated and marginally-educational activities like zip lines in order to have repeat customers.

    • de

      It’s to reinforce their views. They might have a question like how can the world only be 6,000 years old if it takes millions of years for starlight to reach the earth. I once saw Ken Ham doe a Q/A and most of the people there were creationists who were trying to silence the nagging doubts about their beliefs.

    • usclat

      What in the hell are you talking about? Why do you ask, “… don’t we already “know” about God and his work”? No, we don’t. Do you know why? Because there is no fucking god! Allah (or Tlaloc, Zeus, Jesus of Nazareth or whatever) has never been proven to exist outside their shit-filled books. Enough.

      Oh, and Observe this: We will never go back into the darkness of “faith” and ignorance. Never!

    • Alice

      It’s just to make the whole thing look more legit.

  • A3Kr0n

    “…could easily spend 2-3 days there”. That’s what I thought every year my dad took my to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.
    Zip lines for Jesus! Sorry, I just had to get that out…

    • Geoff Boulton

      How bad do you have to be when you can’t sell religious stupid to religious stupid Americans and have to resort to zip lines to bolster falling visitor numbers.

  • sam

    I think she means ‘educational’ in the same sense as when you inadvertently stumble upon Uncle Bob’s German porn stash as an 8 year-old.
    Much like creationism, not an activity for families.

  • Dromicosuchus

    I’d say that as elected Republican officials from Kentucky, they’re actually doing a decent job, in that they’re more than likely voicing the views of the people who voted for them: Republicans from Kentucky. Sadly, I doubt they’re aberrations; they’re just a particularly visible manifestation of a much broader, more widespread scientific illiteracy.

    • usclat

      How quaint. So I suppose the representatives of the pre-Civil War South were “doing a decent job, in that they’re more than likely voicing the views of the people who voted for them”. So in your view Drom, there is no room for evidence, for reason, for discourse, for science, for progress, for justice, for … well, I’m sure you get my general gist. You sir, are a moron.

      • Michael W Busch

        You are using ableist slurs and misrepresenting what everyone else has said. Please do not do either.

        • usclat

          You may be right MB, but I’ve had it with tolerating this bullshit for argument. Slurs be damned.

          • Michael W Busch

            Dromicosuchus said “they’re accurately representing the people who voted for them” and “Sadly, they’re a manifestation of broader scientific illiteracy”. That is not saying that the representatives are doing anything good – it is saying exactly the opposite, while noting that the representatives are in office thanks to the people who voted for them.

            That isn’t a bullshit argument. It’s recognizing the true extent of the problem.

            And it is never appropriate to use bigoted slurs.

            • Jitterbits

              I’m really, really curious what you considered to be a bigoted slur or ableist…

              • Michael W Busch

                The word “moron”.

    • Reginald Selkirk

      I’d say that as elected Republican officials from Kentucky, they’re
      actually doing a decent job, in that they’re more than likely voicing
      the views of the people who voted for them: Republicans from Kentucky.

      Legislators should represent all the people, not just those who voted for them.

  • busterggi

    Is the new zip line only for advanced students who have already mastered riding the mechanical triceratops?

    • http://squeakysoapbox.com/ Rich Wilson

      They should have a sign up saying we don’t really know why people go down the line, but there are a couple of theories.

  • nubwaxer

    it’s a big middle finger salute to science (or more accurately reality) and a public relations advertisement for crony capitalism which is no doubt what this bogus museum is.
    i would go if they had a great flintstone exhibit. no i wouldn’t.

    • allein

      I bet I would find this museum “fun”…in a way. Not the way they intend it to be, but still. I would just have to turn off certain parts of my brain first.

  • Eldergothfather
  • Tak

    People who call outrageous lies educational are either evil to the core, being sarcastic, or completely stupid. Pick one. I would rather believe they are being sarcastic but we all know the most likely answer is stupid.

  • Guest

    ….And one of those lovely people is my representative.

    Sigh.

  • Stu P

    We have a small creationist museum in my town in the UK, and it’s hilarious. Fortunately it’s free admission, so I visit any time I’m feeling down. My favourite exhibit is the one that explains how life couldn’t have emerged, because if that was possible then a severed hand could jump out when you open a can of soup. Priceless.

  • Steve UK

    I would call them pig ignorant but that would be an insult………………to pigs. Are all Republicans this dumb?

    • Reginald Selkirk

      An interesting question. There are some, let’s call them ‘old school’ Republicans who claim the party used to be respectable and stand for fiscal responsibility. But since the time of Reagan (1980s), the party has been dominated by ‘social conservatives who are more concerned with hating gays and outlawing abortions; and truth be told, Republican economics is just as fact-based as Creationism.
      I say: if everyone else in the vehicle is wearing oversized shoes and red rubber noses, you may be in the clown car; and if you don’t have the sense to hop out before it drives over a cliff, you can’t blame people for thinking you too are a clown.

  • ORAXX

    The only way the creation museum could accurately be described as ‘educational’ would as an object lesson, illustrating the danger of ignorance and stupidity.

  • imjustasteph

    I wish I had the dollars to get my kids there. We’ve been doing a lot of looking at claims and learning how to determine whether they have merit, and it would be so cool to take them to something where the claims were presented in such a huge, definitive way, something that so resembles the way real scientific facts are often presented to kids, as a museum. I’d love to see them react- and I’d love to see the museum’s workers react to them.

  • pagansister

    I’m a registered Independent—I don’t align with any party. However IF I had ever thought about being even close to a “party member”, it certainly wouldn’t be the Republican one! They just keep shooting themselves in the foot (or probably the brain from the above post!).

  • http://www.myfathershouse.squarespace.com/ A Christian

    It is educational. If nothing else, you can see what “the other” side believes and why (I am not a Creation-Museum fan, btw, and I have issues with Ken Ham).

    I think this knowledge could provide an opportunity for counter-arguments and respectful debate.

    • Nilanka15

      Making up stories and building a theme park isn’t educational.

      • http://www.miketheinfidel.com/ MikeTheInfidel

        It educates you about what they believe.

        • Nilanka15

          Yes, it’s as educational as Star Wars ;)


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X