Rediscovering ‘The Human Bible’ (A Little Too Late)

Over at my day job, there’s a little gem you may have overlooked.

Since February of last year, Dr. Robert Price has been hosting his solo podcast The Human Bible for CFI. It’s a show in which Bob brings his encyclopedic knowledge and his trademark humor to demystifying the many layers of myth and conjecture about the Bible. The bad news is that it’s coming to an end (at least as a CFI podcast, though Bob does his own thing as well). Funding and listenership were, of course, among the big culprits.

And I admit, I had kind of lost track of it myself. You see I have to consume a great deal of skepto-atheist media in my work, usually very quickly, so even things that CFI produces, things I really love such as Point of Inquiry and the magazines Free Inquiry and Skeptical Inquirer, can pile up.

Now CFI has a final set of 10 episodes of The Human Bible to release over the coming weeks, and it’s been our job to give them a listen and get them up on the website, into feeds, and the like. So I gave a listen to the first of the last, Episode 27.

And I’m telling you, it was great!

Bob got into stuff about the historical Jesus, about the implications of an intervening vs. non-intervening God, and, my favorite, stuff about how Ezekiel might have been describing an encounter with alien spaceships — and it sounded totally plausible! And of course, he was funny and self-effacing as always.

So just having rediscovered The Human Bible, I am sad it’s going away. Bob goes on, of course, as The Bible Geek, and that’s great, but it’s also our loss at CFI that The Human Bible won’t continue under the banner of the Big Blue Meatball. Lucky for us, no matter what happens, there will have been 36 episodes to dig into.

About Paul Fidalgo

Paul is communications director for the Center for Inquiry, as well as an actor and musician. His blog is iMortal, and he tweets as @paulfidalgo, and the blog tweets as @iMortal_blog.
The opinions expressed on this blog are personal to Paul and do not necessarily represent the views of the Center for Inquiry.