A Look at the Key Players in Town of Greece v. Galloway, the Supreme Court Case About Government Prayer

We’re a month away from the Supreme Court hearing oral arguments in Town of Greece v. Galloway, a case that could decide the fate of invocation prayers at government meetings.

While you can read a comprehensive overview of what the case is all about here, PBS’ Religion & Ethics Newsweekly recently ran an excellent segment on the case — interviewing some of the major players on both sides — and it’s now available online:

The best part is where we see a follower of Baha’i offering the invocation, suggesting that the practice is inclusive of all faiths, only to learn moments later that he seems to get invited to speak only when all the cameras are on and court dates loom closer:

[Correspondent] TIM O’BRIEN: But what about Tom Lynch of the Bahai faith, who delivered the prayer when we were there with our cameras last August?

TOM LYNCH (Prayer Giver, August 20, 2013): Well, actually, this was my second time.

O’BRIEN: When was the first time?

LYNCH: In 2008.

O’BRIEN: Five years ago?

LYNCH: Yeah.

O’BRIEN: You were here in 2008 when this case first came up?

LYNCH: Right.

O’BRIEN: And then they invite you back now when it’s before the U.S. Supreme Court?

LYNCH: Right.

O’BRIEN: Coincidence?

LYNCH: Maybe.

O’BRIEN: Do you think the litigation has anything to do with your appearance here?

LYNCH: Indirectly, it does. It was because I heard about the litigation, I checked with the town Clerk to see if they were still doing this, and they invited me back.

O’BRIEN: The lower court found that of more than a hundred thirty prayers offered, only four had been offered by non-Christians…

He’s pretty much the exception that proves the rule.

What’s going on in Greece, New York only looks acceptable if you’re a Christian who assumes everyone else believes just as you do. As you as you step outside the bubble, it’s obvious the system is rigged in favor of Jesus. That’s no way to run a government meeting. The only question now is whether the Supreme Court has the good sense to recognize the injustice.

About Hemant Mehta

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast. You can read much more about him here.