I Cried When I Saw a Christian Woman Destroy All of Paleontology in This Shocking Three-Minute Video

At least, that’s the headline you’d get if Upworthy and Ken Ham College had a love child.

Under the title “Dinosaur Hoax,” this unnamed young debunker of evolution triumphantly proves in a three-minute video that so-called dinosaur fossils are no more significant than random pieces of smashed-up plaster. You can spackle the bits back together any way you choose, she says; therefore, dinosaurs are a fabrication. Checkmate, Darwin!

The whole thing is so comically feeble-minded that I’m not even sure if anyone should debunk the debunking. Maybe this is a Poe? Or an atheist false-flag operation intended to smear Christians as morons?

I have a few minutes, and I don’t mind, so let’s just get this over with.

One: The allegation at 1:19 is nonsense. The first known dinosaur fossil was described in the 17th century by the English naturalist Robert Plot, and he mistook it for the bone of a giant man. The word dinosaur didn’t even enter the lexicon until more than 150 years later, when Richard Owen, a biologist, coined the term (it means “terrible lizard”). The discovery of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals is a result of fossil finds, not the other way around.

Two: Bones are frequently found in isolation; but many times, there is little or nothing to puzzle together, because prehistoric animals, dinosaurs included, have also been discovered fossilized and intact, or nearly so. Exhibit AExhibit BExhibit CExhibit DExhibit E.

Three: Bones (or their fossils) are not some crazy jigsaw equivalent of random pieces of plaster. Unlike arbitrary gypsum fragments, bones have shapes and sizes and hollows and ridges and similar properties that all indicate how they fit together into joints and other skeleton structures. This is obviously true for a mouse, a dog, and a human, including Ms. Einstein up there. Dinosaurs are no different.

I’m still holding out hope that she’s just trolling.

(via Godless Engineer)

About Terry Firma

Terry Firma, though born and Journalism-school-educated in Europe, has lived in the U.S. for the past 20-odd years. Stateside, his feature articles have been published in the New York Times, Reason, Rolling Stone, Playboy, and Wired. Terry is the founder of Moral Compass, a now dormant site that poked fun at the delusional claim by people of faith that a belief in God equips them with superior moral standards. He joined Friendly Atheist in 2013.