After Long Condemning Homosexuality, Evangelicals Are Now Trying to Distance Themselves from Uganda’s Anti-Gay Law

What do you do if you’re an evangelical Christian and you’re asked about the new law in Uganda criminalizing homosexuality, sentencing gay people (in some cases) to life in prison?

You distance yourself from it as much as you possibly can. Which is tough to do when your own stance is still in the realm of, “Gay people shouldn’t have the same rights that I do.”

In Sarah Pulliam Bailey‘s article for Religion News Service, she quotes a few Christians who attempt to explain why Uganda’s laws are bad while also implying that their own views are perfectly fine… which is like a really dark grey pot calling the kettle black.

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After Filing a Lawsuit Against a Public School District That Hosted a Christian Rapper, an Atheist Family Needs Help

Since we often talk on this site about the need for young atheists to stand strong against religious indoctrination in their public schools, it’s only fair that we also discuss the backlash that sometimes results from that.

One particular story — that has a not-so-happy-ending — began in September of 2011 at New Heights Middle School in Chesterfield County, South Carolina, a place that’s home to over two hundred Christian churches.

I wrote about an assembly held at the school in The Young Atheist’s Survival Guide:

Not only did [Pastor Christian Chapman] use his time to rail against atheism, evolution, and homosexuality, he told the students that “a relationship with Jesus is what you need, more important than anything else.” Christian rapper Bryan Edmonds (a.k.a. B-SHOC) later joined him onstage and performed “overtly Christian songs” for the crowd. Even the principal joined the mix by telling students to attend a local church.

But that wasn’t all. Students were told to sign a pledge dedicating themselves to Jesus Christ and teachers were told to pray with students before returning to the classroom. Afterward, the public school’s own website declared that “[b]efore the day ended, 324 kids had either been saved, or had re-committed their lives to the Lord.”

We know about this incident for two main reasons.

First, B-SHOC idiotically posted a video of the event to YouTube (the relevant portion begins at the 3:04 mark):



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This Christian Sorority Had a Choice: Kick Out Two Dating Members or Lose Its Charter

What happens when two women join a Christian sorority, rise to leadership positions within it, and then begin a relationship?

At the UC Berkeley chapter of Alpha Delta Chi, that’s what happened to Kylie Foo and Sophia Chaparro in the spring of 2012. Their decision to be open about their relationship began a chain reaction that led to the sorority’s national board ultimately forcing the members of the group to choose between their charter and their sisters. Sara Grossman does a remarkable job telling the story in The Daily Californian:



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An Atheist Member of the Arizona House of Representatives Delivered Another Godless Invocation This Week

Last May, when Arizona State Representative Juan Mendez (below) delivered a secular invocation on the House floor, a Christian colleague delivered two religious invocations the following day — to make up to God for the “mistake,” I suppose.

Hopefully that won’t be the case this time around.

On Monday, Mendez delivered another secular invocation, this time appealing a bit more to the religious legislators in the room (as opposed to last time, when he quoted Carl Sagan):

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How Long Should a Family’s Roadside Cross in Memory of Their Son Be Allowed to Stay Up?

In May of 2012, 19-year-old Anthony Devaney was taking a nighttime walk when a car struck and killed him.

It wasn’t long before a large cross was placed at the scene of the tragedy:

Here’s a difficult question: How long should that cross be allowed to stay up? Forever? A few months? It’s not an easy discussion to have, but the American Humanist Association’s Appignani Humanist Legal Center believes it’s time for the city of Lake Elsinore (yep, them again) to take it down. In fact, the city did take it down last December… but they put it right back up after Devaney’s mother “demanded” its return.

In a letter to the Lake Elsinore City Council, the AHLC says that to leave the cross up now amounts to government promotion of religion:

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