Hey, Pope, Come Have Dinner with Her Two Moms!

During the Pope’s Christmas address, he used his time to criticize gay people for… being gay…

Emma Tattenbaum-Fine has a message for His Holy Popeness: Come have dinner with my two moms [Read more...]

Christian Pastor: I Believe Mocking Jesus Should Be Outlawed!

There’s apparently a TV show called “Preaching the Word With Evangelist Jeff Worley” that airs in Roanoke, VA in the early morning hours on Saturday… and on today’s episode, Worley talked about a certain American Atheists billboard he saw in Times Square…: [Read more...]

Jesus Can Save You! But I Hope He Doesn’t…

Upton Sinclair, in his book I, Candidate for Governor, says the line: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

That’s the first thing I thought of, anyway, when I saw this cartoon from nakedpastor:

[Read more...]

When You Criticize the Godless, It Often Goes Unchallenged

David Niose picked up on something Mike Huckabee said in the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre that a lot of people ignored.

First, here’s what Huckabee said: [Read more...]

New York Times: Where Were Atheists After the Sandy Hook Massacre?

Samuel Freedman has an article in today’s New York Times with the headline, “In a Crisis, Humanists Seem Absent.” The gist, as you might guess, is that in the wake of a disaster like the Sandy Hook massacre, there were religious groups waiting to serve the victims’ families and the community… but there was no obvious Humanist presence:

This illustration of religious belief in action, of faith expressed in extremis, an example at once so heart-rending and so affirming, has left behind one prickly question: Where were the humanists? At a time when the percentage of Americans without religious affiliation is growing rapidly, why did the “nones,” as they are colloquially known, seem so absent?

To raise these queries is not to play gotcha, or to be judgmental in a dire time. In fact, some leaders within the humanist movement — an umbrella term for those who call themselves atheists, agnostics, secularists and freethinkers, among other terms — are ruefully and self-critically saying the same thing themselves.

“It is a failure of community, and that’s where the answer for the future has to lie,” said Greg M. Epstein, 35, the humanist chaplain at Harvard and author of the book “Good Without God.” “What religion has to offer to people at moments like this — more than theology, more than divine presence — is community. And we need to provide an alternative form of community if we’re going to matter for the increasing number of people who say they are not believers.

[Read more...]


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