Former ‘Two and a Half Men’ Star is Now a Spokesperson for Jesus

The last time we heard from Angus T. Jones, the “half” in “Two and a Half Men,” he was making about $300,000 per episode but ready to throw it all away because he was morally opposed to the show’s plotlines, which went against his Seventh-day Adventist values.

It wasn’t all that different from what happened with Kirk Cameron during his Growing Pains days after he became ultra-religious:

Once he converted to Christianity, he sometimes clashed with his fellow cast members and the show’s producers over what he felt were immoral story lines.

Now, a year after leaving the show, Jones is back in the spotlight. He recently spoke at World Harvest Outreach Church in Houston about how he found God:

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The 2014 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism Goes to…

The “Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism” is given out by the Humanist Community at Harvard, the American Humanist Association, and the Harvard Community of Humanists, Atheists, and Agnostics.

This year, the award will be given to former Congressman Barney Frank:

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Republican House Candidate Who Said Autism Was the Result of God’s Anger Over Gay Marriage Just Won Her Primary

Susanne Atanus, the 55-year-old Republican who told a local newspaper that God put autism and dementia on Earth as punishment for marriage equality and abortion, just won her primary for a seat in the House of representatives. She will face off against incumbent Democrat Rep. Jan Schakowsky this November:

Voters in the Republican primary will have two very different candidates to choose from in the 9th Congressional District, as David Earl Williams III and Susanne Atanus vie for the right to face Rep. Jan Schakowsky in the fall…

“I am a conservative Republican and I believe in God first,” Atanus said. She said she believes God controls the weather and has put tornadoes and diseases such as autism and dementia on earth as punishment for gay rights and legalized abortions.

Party leaders in the state urged her to drop out of the race, but she didn’t. Worked out for her (and maybe the rest of us, too); she came away with a narrow victory over her opponent David Earl Williams III:

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The History of the Westboro Baptist Church: Onion Edition

The Onion informs us of the history of Fred Phelps and Westboro Baptist Church:

And that’s only the beginning

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A Decade Later, This is the 500-Page Creationism Book a Public School Biology Teacher Gave His Students

For 15 years, high school biology teacher Larry Booher gave his Biology 2 students an extra credit assignment. All they had to do was read a 500-page book that Booher had compiled from a variety of sources… all of which pointed to Creationism as the way we came to be. It was awful science to begin with, but the fact that a public school teacher was advocating it made it completely illegal.

In all that time, no one complained about the book. Why not? Maybe because John S. Battle High School was in Bristol, Virginia and pretty much everyone you knew was a Christian. But that shouldn’t have mattered.

In 2005, administrators in the district received an “anonymous tip” about what Booher was doing. Ultimately, they forced him to stop distributing his book. And that was it. A slap on the wrist. He continued teaching for several years before finally retiring.

“He told the students, ‘You may read this. You don’t have to. It has some Bible references in it,’” Washington County School Superintendent Alan Lee said Thursday. “This teacher felt like he wasn’t doing anything wrong.”

The superintendent declined to say what punishment, if any, Booher would face, calling it a personnel matter. But he said the 48-year-old Booher was “one of the finest science teachers I’ve ever been around” and would return to the classroom in the fall after he agreed to stop distributing the creationism materials.

“He must teach evolution exclusively — observable scientific fact, not beliefs or religion,” Lee said. “I fully believe he will comply. He just stepped over the line.”

Keep in mind: this all happened just months before the verdict in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District, a case about teaching Intelligent Design in public schools. Creationism was a major topic of discussion and the Associated Press story about Booher (along with similar reports) made the rounds throughout the media.

So why do I bring all this up now?

Because I’ve been in contact with the “anonymous” tipster who outed Booher in 2005 — and I now possess a scanned copy of the 500-page Creationism booklet.

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