Meth-Dealing Priest and Money Launderer Kevin Wallin Would Like a Light Sentence, Please

If Father Kevin Wallin had peed in the baptismal font, smoked kush in the confessional, and humped a life-size crucifix, his bosses and parishioners would probably only be half as shocked as they are by what Wallin really did do.

Wallin, now 63 years old, was formerly the priest at St. Augustine Parish in Bridgeport, Connecticut, but was suspended in May of 2013 after church authorities say they learned that the pastor was engaging in gay sex in the church rectory. He also had a habit of dressing in women’s clothes, according to reports at the time.

But that pales next to the meth-dealing and money-laundering.

The out-of-control priest allegedly laundered his excess drug cash [from the sale of methamphetamine] by investing in a local business.

Liquor store? Car wash? Nope.

Sex shop.



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It’s a Miracle! Vatican Claims Coagulated “Blood” of St. Gennaro Liquefies After Pope Francis Kisses the Vial

The Catholic network Aleteia is named after the Greek word for truth, so this report must be totally truthful:

 The blood relic of St. Gennaro [a.k.a. Januarius], patron saint of Naples, [yesterday] miraculously liquefied in the presence of Pope Francis, the first time the miracle has occurred in the presence of a pontiff since 1848.

His blood has half-liquefied,” the Archbishop of Naples, Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe, said at the conclusion of Pope Francis’ address to diocesan priest and religious in the city’s cathedral. “It’s a sign that St. Gennaro loves the Pope, who is neapolitan like us.”



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Seven Children Perish In Brooklyn House Fire; NYFD Suspects That a Hot Plate, a Sabbath Loophole, Is To Blame

Because I wrote about it at the time, I’ve always remembered the dozens of fires that broke out during the early months of 2005 fires in Bedford Gardens, Brooklyn, a big apartment complex. That would have to be the work of a serial arsonist, right? Not so:

A fire caused by stovetop burners left on for Passover killed three boys as it whipped through a Brooklyn apartment before dawn yesterday, a few hours after the family had gone to bed at the end of a night of feasting, singing and celebrating. …

A fire official said that the Orthodox Jewish custom of leaving a flame burning during Sabbath and holidays has caused 35 kitchen fires at Bedford Gardens, the 600-unit apartment complex in Williamsburg, in the last several months.

Now, close to that same location, it’s happened again, and most likely for the same reason. This time the fire, which started early Saturday morning, engulfed a single-family house. Seven kids burned to death. The number of victims means that it’s the largest fire tragedy that New York City has seen since 2008.



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Children in London School Instructed Not To Watch Solar Eclipse For “Religious and Cultural Reasons”

But what if RaTonatiuh, and Svarog wanted us to watch the solar eclipse? When children disobey ancient sun deities, what is to become of their immortal souls?

From the U.K. Telegraph (confirmed via the Independent and ITV):

A London primary school was criticized for banning children from watching the eclipse for “religious and cultural reasons.” Pupils at North Primary School in Southall were stopped from watching the solar eclipse directly and had to observe it on screens instead.

Sometimes known as Little India, Southall is a diverse community in west London with a large Hindi population.



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God’s Bankers: Gerald Posner’s Financial Exposé of the Catholic Church Produces “An Acute Sensation of Disgust”

A new book by investigative journalist Gerald Posner, a 732-page tome titled God’s Bankers, lays bare “the history of money and power at the Vatican.”

Writes reviewer Damon Linker in the New York Times:

[T]he church from the beginning has been an all-too-human institution that ­often follows a logic of self-interest, placing the good of its members ahead of those outside it, and the good of those in positions of ecclesiastical power ahead of the good of everyone else. To a greater or lesser extent, this has been true of most institutions throughout history, though it has been a particular problem in the 2,000-year history of the church, with its lack of democratic accountability and deep roots in the corruption-prone political culture of the Italian peninsula. The result has been a tension — and sometimes a blatant contradiction — between the church’s exalted claims for itself and its behavior.

Think of medieval popes waging the Crusades — raising armies, sacking ­cities and conquering territory — in the name of Jesus Christ. Or prelates torturing apostates and heretics during the Inquisition. Or Pope Pius V expelling Jews from the Papal States in 1569. Or Pope Pius XI signing the Reichskonkordat with ­Hitler, which, in return for winning a measure of freedom for German Catholics ­under the Nazis, assured silence from the Holy See over the forced sterilization of 400,000 people and then only the faintest of ­objections to the Holocaust. Or more ­recently, bishops and other church officials concealing widespread and repeated child sexual abuse by priests.

I imagine that by this point, Bill Donohue‘s ears are producing steam, but Posner has only just scratched the surface:



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