University Researcher Says Pious Religious Students Are More Likely to Cheat Financially

A new academic study appears to show that people who say religion is really important to them are also more likely to lie if it benefits them financially. The same is true for business majors and for children of divorced parents. As for the religious being more dishonest,

…[t]he lead researcher [Associate Professor of Economics Jason Childs, at Canada’s University of Regina] hypothesizes that this “really strange effect” is the result of the faithful feeling less kinship with the secular, and ultimately less concern about screwing them over for a few bucks.

The study will be published in the December issue of the journal Economics Letters. How was it conducted? The research team randomly split four hundred people into pairs, and asked each pair to conduct a simple money transaction.

[Read more…]

Hispanic-American Adults Are Less Catholic and More ‘Unaffiliated’ Than Ever Before

A few weeks ago, the Public Religion Research Institute released a report called the “2013 Hispanic Values Survey.”

A new graphic from PRRI released yesterday highlights the big changes: Fewer Catholics and more religiously unaffiliated Hispanics than ever before:



[Read more…]

If You’re a Minority Atheist, This Researcher Would Like to Talk to You

Professor Jerome Baggett of the Santa Clara Jesuit School of Theology is conducting a study on American Atheists and he’d like to hear more from those in minority atheist communities (specifically atheists who also identify as African-American, Latino/Hispanic and Asian/Pacific Islander).

If you’d like to participate, feel free to email Baggett directly! [Read more…]

Scotland’s 2011 Census Data May Have Underrepresented the Percent of Non-Religious Citizens

The results from Scotland’s 2011 census have just been released (take your sweet time, Scotland) and they show a growing divergence when it comes to religious beliefs:

Over half (54 per cent) of the population of Scotland stated their religion as Christian — a decrease of 11 percentage points since 2001 — whilst 37 per cent of people stated that they had no religion — an increase of nine percentage points since 2001.

Good news, right?

Well, the Humanist Society Scotland says the results don’t reflect the truth about the religious identities of the Scottish people. The disparity is much greater than the census claims, they say:

[Click headline for more…] [Read more…]

New Poll Shows That 1 in 3 Young Jewish Americans Are Not Religious

A new survey on Jewish Americans released just now by the Pew Research Center shows what we’ve come to expect from these reports: They are becoming less religious overall, with Millennial Jews even less religious than their older counterparts:

A Pew Research reanalysis of the 2000-2001 National Jewish Population Survey suggests that at that time, 93% of Jews in that study were Jews by religion and 7% were Jews of no religion (after some adjustments to make the NJPS and Pew Research categories as similar as possible). In the new Pew Research survey, 78% of Jews are Jews by religion, and fully 22% are Jews of no religion (including 6% who are atheist, 4% who are agnostic and 12% whose religion is “nothing in particular”). Though the two studies employed different question wording and methodologies and are thus not directly comparable, the magnitude of these differences suggests that Jews of no religion have grown as a share of the Jewish population and the overall U.S. public. The new Pew Research survey finds that approximately 0.5% of U.S. adults — about 1.2 million people — are Jews of no religion.

[Click headline for more…] [Read more…]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X