Carroll County Officials Decide by the Narrowest of Margins to Follow Court Order & Stop Praying to Jesus at Meetings

After a judge told the Carroll County (Maryland) Board of Commissioners that they needed to stop their prayers to Jesus at meetings, they decided they didn’t give a damn what the law said.

A day after the ruling, commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier said a religious prayer anyway (falsely attributing it to President George Washington).

After the American Humanist Association’s Appignani Humanist Legal Center sent the commissioners’ lawyers a warning letter threatening a contempt charge if there was another attempt to defy the ruling, the board went ahead and invited a speaker who also said a prayer to Jesus.

So the AHA demanded the court issue a heavy fine against the board — to the tune of $30,000 immediately and $10,000 for each additional violation of the court order.

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Congressman Caught in Affair Ran on Christian Values… That Jilted Husband Says He Faked

Cool story, bro.

Family values Congressman is caught on security-camera footage French-kissing a staffer. She‘s out of a job as soon as the affair comes to light… while he makes the usual feeble apologetic noises about having failed his wife and his five kids and his constituents… and gets to keep his position.

Here’s the politician’s pitch before over-credulous voters sent him to Washington:

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The Judge Whose Decision Led to Town of Greece v. Galloway Expounds on the Establishment Clause

As we wait for the Supreme Court to rule in Town of Greece v. Galloway, the case involving public prayers at government functions, let’s recall what Judge Guido Calabresi (below) wrote for the United States 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in May of 2012. The panel said at the time that the sectarian prayers in Greece, New York were unconstitutional:

We conclude, on the record before us, that the town’s prayer practice must be viewed as an endorsement of a particular religious viewpoint. This conclusion is supported by several considerations, including the prayer-giver selection process, the content of the prayers, and the contextual actions (and inactions) of prayer-givers and town officials. We emphasize that, in reaching this conclusion, we do not rely on any single aspect of the town’s prayer practice, but rather on the totality of the circumstances present in this case.

Calabresi, however, doesn’t think the media has characterized his argument properly. It’s not that he’s against prayer; it’s actually much more complicated than that. In an interview with Marie Griffith at Religion & Politics, he elaborated on that idea:

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Tennessee Senate Votes to Put ‘In God We Trust’ Sign in Capitol; House Likely to Follow Suit This Week

Yesterday, the Tennessee State Senate unanimously voted in favor of a bill that would add a sign to the state capitol building reading “In God We Trust.”

Both Senate Bill 2003 and House Bill 1776 (which will be voted on this Wednesday) were sponsored by — wait for it — Republicans: Senator Stacey Campfield and Rep. Mike Sparks:

The Senate bill also includes this amendment:

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UK Government Official: ‘We’re a Christian Nation… Get Over It’

Over the weekend, Eric Pickles (below), the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government in the UK, made a remarkable claim in London:

“I’ve stopped an attempt by militant atheists to ban councils having prayers at the start of meetings if they wish,” said Pickles. “Heaven forbid. We’re a Christian nation. We have an established church. Get over it. And don’t impose your politically correct intolerance on others.

Pickles rewrote the laws in 2012 to ban lawsuits against parish councils for their public prayers (though the National Secular Society begs to differ on his impact).

So it’s intolerant when “militant atheists” (which means what, exactly?) attempt to keep a government meeting neutral, but imposing religious prayers at those meetings is somehow inclusive?

Non-theistic groups in the region are already weighing in on the matter, holding very little back.

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