After Negative Feedback, Chili’s Will Not Be Donating 10% of Customers’ Checks to Anti-Vaccine Group Tomorrow

Chili’s Grill & Bar was planning to host a nationwide fundraiser tomorrow night in which a portion of all proceeds would be given to the National Autism Association. That sounds all well and good until you take a look at the NAA’s website, specifically the page listing the causes of autism.

For no good reason — certainly, no scientific reason — the list includes “Vaccines”:

For that reason, spurred by popular websites reporting on it, people began complaining about Chili’s on various social media networks.

It’s entirely possible (hell, it’s very probable) Chili’s had no idea supporting the NAA would be controversial — they just figured they were helping a good cause — but to their credit, they’ve just announced that they will no longer be giving any money to the anti-vaxxer organization:

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Church Full of Oil Salesmen Claims to Cure Everything from Heart Defects to Mental Illness

The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God in Auckland, New Zealand has found the cure for damn near everything: “tumours, mental illness, stomach and bladder problems, marriage difficulties, strokes and heart defects.”

Their cure: Olive oil.

Don’t believe it, you say? Well, the oil was “blessed” in Israel… and it’s magical now. So there!

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Jimmy Wales: Wikipedia Won’t Pretend the ‘Work of Lunatic Charlatans is the Equivalent of True Scientific Discourse’

I don’t know what the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology was thinking starting a petition to get Wikipedia to treat their pseudoscience more favorably.

… people who are interested in the benefits of Energy Medicine, Energy Psychology, and specific approaches such as the Emotional Freedom Techniques, Thought Field Therapy and the Tapas Acupressure Technique, turn to [Wikipedia's] pages, trust what they read, and do not pursue getting help from these approaches which research has, in fact, proven to be of great benefit to many.

They urged petitioners not to give any money to Wikipedia unless these changes were made.

However, their efforts were slammed by none other than Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, who wrote up a blistering rebuttal:

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Homeopathic Products Recalled Because They Might Have Actual Medicine In Them

This actually happened:



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A Century Ago, These Poorly-Done Trick Photos of the Spirit World Had Many People Convinced

These turn-of-the-last-century photos are a visual cabinet of curiosities, all the more wondrous for having convinced anyone, at any point, that spirit mediums and visits from beyond the grave are real.

On the other hand, it doesn’t surprise me very much to learn that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, was convinced that the images below were genuine. While his famous protagonist was a cynic who believed in evidence, logic, and reason, Conan Doyle himself was P.T. Barnum‘s proverbial sucker, a man so keen on believing in the existence of the paranormal that he went to his grave with the certitude that fairies exist, based on a hoax photo made by two young girls.

Anyway, this is what you would have seen at a séance a hundred or so years ago:



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