Doctor Who Says Cancer Patients Can “Heal Themselves” Through Diet and Attitude Exposed by CBC

Several months ago, I posted about Makayla Sault (below), an 11-year-old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The disease is treatable with two years of tough chemotherapy and has a nearly 90% survival rate… but Makayla no longer wanted to continue the chemo and her Ojibwe/First Nations parents were more than happy to oblige, seeking out useless faith-based treatments instead.

Makayla was allowed to quit the chemo, but we learned in October that her condition had worsened.

And to make the issue even more on the forefront of people’s minds, it turned out another First Nations girl was in the same position — she would benefit from chemo, but she didn’t want to go through with it for cultural reasons.

Now, the CBC has discovered that the Florida doctor treating Makayla (and many others) may not even be qualified to provide care:

[Read more...]

Curt Schilling Defends Creationism on Twitter

For some reason, retired baseball star Curt Schilling decided to argue with people on Twitter about evolution yesterday. (Which is really where all academic debates should take place.)

Too bad the man with three World Series rings took on the role of Kirk Cameron:



[Read more...]

Epic Rap Battle: Ghostbusters vs Mythbusters

Now, there’s a Rap Battle: Ghostbusters vs Mythbusters!



[Read more...]

Happy Sagan Day!

Carl Sagan was born 80 years ago today. Although we’re still mourning his passing, he left a legacy of curiosity and optimism worthy of celebration.

You can find this image and many others like it on the Friendly Atheist Facebook page!

[Read more...]

The Dying of DNA Pioneer Francis Crick: Dealing With Death When You Don’t Believe in an Afterlife

Ten summers ago, Francis Crick, the famed molecular biologist and neuroscientist who won a Nobel Prize for co-discovering DNA, died after a years-long battle with colon cancer. One of his closest friends and collaborators, Kristof Koch, remembers Crick’s demise — and especially his unflappability in the face of death – in this funny and moving 16-minute presentation, recorded before an appreciative audience at the World Science Festival.

We feature it here because, unlike Koch, who remained a practicing Catholic (more on that later), Crick didn’t believe in an afterlife. In fact, he was often profoundly irritated by religion, especially Christianity:

“I do not respect Christian beliefs. I think they are ridiculous. If we could get rid of them we could more easily get down to the serious problem of trying to find out what the world is all about.”



[Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X