Heathen Holiday Card of the Day! (12/25)

A bit of a back story:

Hemant and I have been discussing a way to cap off the last couple weeks’ worth of cards and coming up empty-handed.

Then, last night at a family Christmas Eve party, I discreetly checked my email, and then burst out laughing at the tweet Hemant sent to me from M. Anton Mikicic.

Not only is this card magical, I am reasonably certain that it is going to be my personal holiday card next year: [Read more...]

The Winner of the 2012 Bad Faith Award Is…

As mentioned by Hemant back in November, New Humanist runs a poll every year known as the “Bad Faith Awards.” Readers vote for the person (or group) who has done the best to show the very worst of his/her faith over the past year.

Well, the votes are finally in and the 2012 New Humanist Bad Faith Award goes to (drumroll please!)… [Read more...]

Judge Will Allow Students to Remain Anonymous in Lawsuit to Remove Ten Commandments Monument from Their Public High School

This is the Ten Commandments monument sitting outside Valley High School in New Kensington, Pennsylvania (not far from Pittsburgh):

[Read more...]

Why I’m Against Christmas Cheer

Taken at face value, who could argue against “Christmas cheer?” Everyone looks forward to the Holiday Season, so the lore goes. Christmas is a national reprieve from the mundanity of everyday life, a time to set aside our troubles, kick back, and revel in festivity.

When “cheer” is experienced genuinely, it can have great salutary effect. But when cheer is effectively enforced — by cultural and/or familial custom — it can do just the opposite. I don’t feel particularly compelled to adopt a cheerful demeanor simply because tomorrow happens to be the 25th day of December, and the expectation that I must sours my mood further. Ritualistic expressions of saccharine cheer are almost always pretty depressing, in fact, on Christmas or any other day. [Read more...]

Ireland Legalizes Weddings Performed by Humanists

In Ireland, if a Humanist Celebrant performs a wedding, it’s only symbolic. You still have to have a civil ceremony for the wedding to be legally-binding.

Not anymore, though. [Read more...]


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