Slander according to Islam

A piece on how a court ruling opens up the possibility of Islamic law being applied in a libel case gives more evidence of how Islam may indeed become THE postmodernist religion:

In the U.S., the Supreme Court’s seminal 1964 New York Times v. Sullivan decision defined libel or slander by a journalist as stating or writing falsehoods or misrepresentations that damage someone’s reputation—and in cases of public figures, doing so with malice.

Under sharia, by contrast, libel constitutes any oral or written remark offensive to a complainant, regardless of its accuracy or intent. Slander “means to mention anything concerning a person that he would dislike, whether about his body, religion, everyday life, self, disposition, property, son, father, wife, servant, turban, garment, gait, movements, smiling, dissoluteness, frowning, cheerfulness, or anything else connected with him,” according to Ahmad Ibn Lulu Ibn Al-Naqib (d. 1368).

If truth is relative, how can there be slander or libel laws? The answer has to be that slander must consist of words that someone does not LIKE and so finds “offensive.” In our popular discourse, we have ALREADY adopted the Islamic definition.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • John

    I sometimes think that if not for 9/11 the teachings of Islam might have slipped into our culture entirely under the radar, until it was too late to do anything about it. Who knows? It may already be too late.

  • John

    I sometimes think that if not for 9/11 the teachings of Islam might have slipped into our culture entirely under the radar, until it was too late to do anything about it. Who knows? It may already be too late.

  • S Bauer

    Can lawyers be depended on to resist this kind of change to our understanding of libel law? (I’m not speaking of all the good, kind, benevolent, altruistic lawyers out there).

  • S Bauer

    Can lawyers be depended on to resist this kind of change to our understanding of libel law? (I’m not speaking of all the good, kind, benevolent, altruistic lawyers out there).

  • Hiddenfaces7

    John, you are right on the money…Extremist Islam would have slipped right into our society unnoticed until it was too late to condemn it for the falsehood it is!

  • Hiddenfaces7

    John, you are right on the money…Extremist Islam would have slipped right into our society unnoticed until it was too late to condemn it for the falsehood it is!


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