Third parties?

I’ve heard many people dismayed by the major party presidential slate say that they would turn to a third party. Well, does anyone know what the various third parties are doing? Do they have a candidate either?

I’ve heard the Libertarians might nominate Ron Paul, but wouldn’t his pro-life convictions rule him out for that party?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Chris Hurst

    I’ve heard that the Green Party is running Cynthia McKinney. As for the Libertarians running Ron Paul; I like Ron Paul, and wish he was a more viable candidate, but I think a third party candidacy on his part would guarantee an Obama or Clinton victory. I hope he is content to lead a movement within the GOP, instead of Perot’ing the ’08 election.

  • Chris Hurst

    I’ve heard that the Green Party is running Cynthia McKinney. As for the Libertarians running Ron Paul; I like Ron Paul, and wish he was a more viable candidate, but I think a third party candidacy on his part would guarantee an Obama or Clinton victory. I hope he is content to lead a movement within the GOP, instead of Perot’ing the ’08 election.

  • http://poststop.wordpress.com Ethan

    I am ready to vote for RP but to my dismay I have my doubts regarding the strength of the Libertarians here in conservative Collin County.

    http://www.fourthgeek.com/cclp/members.html

    (you need to click the link to see what I mean)

  • http://poststop.wordpress.com Ethan

    I am ready to vote for RP but to my dismay I have my doubts regarding the strength of the Libertarians here in conservative Collin County.

    http://www.fourthgeek.com/cclp/members.html

    (you need to click the link to see what I mean)

  • David Thompson

    The Constitution Party has wanted to nominate Ron Paul as well. This party is libertarian in some ways (limited government, strict constitutionalists) but with strong moral positions on abortion (100% pro life), etc. They have had a candidate for president since 1992. They will not go anywhere, now, but their platform would seem to appeal to many conservatives, especially Christian conservatves. See http://www.constitutionparty.com/party_platform.php#Preamble

  • David Thompson

    The Constitution Party has wanted to nominate Ron Paul as well. This party is libertarian in some ways (limited government, strict constitutionalists) but with strong moral positions on abortion (100% pro life), etc. They have had a candidate for president since 1992. They will not go anywhere, now, but their platform would seem to appeal to many conservatives, especially Christian conservatves. See http://www.constitutionparty.com/party_platform.php#Preamble

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Lots of libertarians support Paul specifically because he wants to overturn Roe v. Wade and return it to the states–thinking pro-choicers can support that.

    And then there are a bunch of guys (like a colleague of mine) who find themselves supporting both Paul and Kucinich. That just about makes my head explode. :^)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Lots of libertarians support Paul specifically because he wants to overturn Roe v. Wade and return it to the states–thinking pro-choicers can support that.

    And then there are a bunch of guys (like a colleague of mine) who find themselves supporting both Paul and Kucinich. That just about makes my head explode. :^)

  • Kirk

    Ron Paul has explicitly stated that he will not run on the Contitution party ticket, which is probably wise for the future of his political career and personal credibility. I know that the Libertarian party has asked him to run and that he hasn’t officially turned them down. Plus, he ran for them in ’88, so who knows. I know that officially the Libertarians are pro-choice, but there is a significant pro-life movement within the party and that there’s a strong libertarian argument to be made for banning abortion, so I’m not sure how big of a deal Paul’s stance is.

    I know that Nader is running on an independent ticket. I’m not sure what his plaform is, though.

  • Kirk

    Ron Paul has explicitly stated that he will not run on the Contitution party ticket, which is probably wise for the future of his political career and personal credibility. I know that the Libertarian party has asked him to run and that he hasn’t officially turned them down. Plus, he ran for them in ’88, so who knows. I know that officially the Libertarians are pro-choice, but there is a significant pro-life movement within the party and that there’s a strong libertarian argument to be made for banning abortion, so I’m not sure how big of a deal Paul’s stance is.

    I know that Nader is running on an independent ticket. I’m not sure what his plaform is, though.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Wouldn’t Ron Paul have to give up his congressional seat to run Third Party? I think he’s vowed not to do that.

    And third party? Come on, how about a 2nd party.

    Everybody vote Republicrat!

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Wouldn’t Ron Paul have to give up his congressional seat to run Third Party? I think he’s vowed not to do that.

    And third party? Come on, how about a 2nd party.

    Everybody vote Republicrat!

  • Joe

    That is a question of Texas state law. Nothing in federal law prohibits a person from running for two federal offices at the same time. It comes down to whether Texas has placed a limit on it. In 2000 Lieberman ran for VP and US Senate.

  • Joe

    That is a question of Texas state law. Nothing in federal law prohibits a person from running for two federal offices at the same time. It comes down to whether Texas has placed a limit on it. In 2000 Lieberman ran for VP and US Senate.

  • Kirk

    Oh, and there’s always Gene Amondson of the prohibition party.

  • Kirk

    Oh, and there’s always Gene Amondson of the prohibition party.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Joe @ #7
    The question is whether a person can be in two parties at the same time – a Republican congressman / libertarian presidential candidate? Is that even possible?

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Joe @ #7
    The question is whether a person can be in two parties at the same time – a Republican congressman / libertarian presidential candidate? Is that even possible?

  • Joe

    Bryan @ 9

    My mistake; I misunderstood your point. That would be up to two political parties. Whether someone can run as a Republican, Libertarian, Democrat, etc. is left to the individual state parties. They control the use of their name by their power to control who is on the ballet. In Wisconsin, RPW decided that Alan Keyes (did you even know he was running?) should not be on the ballot as a Republican. So he wasn’t able to run as a Republican in Wisconsin. Of course, he could have run as an independent.

  • Joe

    Bryan @ 9

    My mistake; I misunderstood your point. That would be up to two political parties. Whether someone can run as a Republican, Libertarian, Democrat, etc. is left to the individual state parties. They control the use of their name by their power to control who is on the ballet. In Wisconsin, RPW decided that Alan Keyes (did you even know he was running?) should not be on the ballot as a Republican. So he wasn’t able to run as a Republican in Wisconsin. Of course, he could have run as an independent.

  • DCJ

    Hey Ethan, I’m another Collin County resident.. Small world…

  • DCJ

    Hey Ethan, I’m another Collin County resident.. Small world…

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    And, Ethan, thanks for that link to the Libertarian politicos. A bunch of little kids!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    And, Ethan, thanks for that link to the Libertarian politicos. A bunch of little kids!

  • http://www.cockahoop.com/ tODD

    For what it’s worth, I grew up in Richardson, just south of the Collin County line. We had to drive to Collin County to be able to shop in a supermarket where you could buy beer or wine.

    I don’t suppose any of you are members of Faith, Plano?

  • http://www.cockahoop.com/ tODD

    For what it’s worth, I grew up in Richardson, just south of the Collin County line. We had to drive to Collin County to be able to shop in a supermarket where you could buy beer or wine.

    I don’t suppose any of you are members of Faith, Plano?

  • Kyralessa

    I’m pretty sure the Constitution Party is who I voted in ’04, because I couldn’t vote Bush again, but I sure as heck couldn’t vote for pro-abortion Kerry either.

    There are some pro-life Libertarians out there, though. You can defend being pro-life and Libertarian if you believe the government shouldn’t be legislating *against* the unborn.

  • Kyralessa

    I’m pretty sure the Constitution Party is who I voted in ’04, because I couldn’t vote Bush again, but I sure as heck couldn’t vote for pro-abortion Kerry either.

    There are some pro-life Libertarians out there, though. You can defend being pro-life and Libertarian if you believe the government shouldn’t be legislating *against* the unborn.

  • DCJ

    tODD, I currently live in Richardson. I’ve visited Faith Plano, but I recently joined Messiah LCMS in Richardson.

  • DCJ

    tODD, I currently live in Richardson. I’ve visited Faith Plano, but I recently joined Messiah LCMS in Richardson.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    One might be able to make a solid libertarian argument against legalized abortion — I certainly think that’s possible — but making the argument and selling it among Libertarians (capital “L”) are two different things. I remember trying to make such an argument over in the discussion boards at Reason magazine once and if they could have tarred and feathered me, they would have, mainly because of a strong anti-religious streak among libertarians and because a lot of them simply don’t think an unborn baby is a human being. (One commenter with whom I debated claimed that aborting a baby was the exact same thing as cutting off a dead limb, or excising a cancerous tumor — and most everybody agreed with him.)

    If somebody can get the pro-life message across to those people, then great, but to me it seems unlikely. Even if an avowed atheist argued against abortion on an individual rights basis, the anti-religious bias of many libertarians would simply see that person as a religious nut (which to them is a redundant phrase).

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    One might be able to make a solid libertarian argument against legalized abortion — I certainly think that’s possible — but making the argument and selling it among Libertarians (capital “L”) are two different things. I remember trying to make such an argument over in the discussion boards at Reason magazine once and if they could have tarred and feathered me, they would have, mainly because of a strong anti-religious streak among libertarians and because a lot of them simply don’t think an unborn baby is a human being. (One commenter with whom I debated claimed that aborting a baby was the exact same thing as cutting off a dead limb, or excising a cancerous tumor — and most everybody agreed with him.)

    If somebody can get the pro-life message across to those people, then great, but to me it seems unlikely. Even if an avowed atheist argued against abortion on an individual rights basis, the anti-religious bias of many libertarians would simply see that person as a religious nut (which to them is a redundant phrase).


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