After the internet

We may be going from the web to the grid. New technology to be launched this summer may lead to the internet, which still relies on phone-company type switches, becoming obsolete. The new “grid” will eventually run 10,000 times faster than broadband, making possible near-instantaneous downloads, holographic images, and who knows what else. At least according to this.

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  • WebMonk

    Hmmm, something that runs 10,000 times faster than broadband – sounds suspiciously like my current fiber connection. My provider doesn’t give me access to all that speed at a cost I’m willing to pay, but it’s there.

    While I agree with the general movement of the Internet toward a fairly ubiquitous “grid” of very fast connectivity, the stuff that the article is promoting is just a sensationalist puff piece. It already exists and is available, just not in a widespread manner to individuals. Mostly businesses, universities, and telecoms have it right now, and they split it up to their individual users.

    The general speeds available to the public will continue to increase and will reach the speeds and ubiquity the article talks about, but the CERN network is hardly anything new and revolutionary; it’s just an all-fiber network running on good servers.

  • WebMonk

    Hmmm, something that runs 10,000 times faster than broadband – sounds suspiciously like my current fiber connection. My provider doesn’t give me access to all that speed at a cost I’m willing to pay, but it’s there.

    While I agree with the general movement of the Internet toward a fairly ubiquitous “grid” of very fast connectivity, the stuff that the article is promoting is just a sensationalist puff piece. It already exists and is available, just not in a widespread manner to individuals. Mostly businesses, universities, and telecoms have it right now, and they split it up to their individual users.

    The general speeds available to the public will continue to increase and will reach the speeds and ubiquity the article talks about, but the CERN network is hardly anything new and revolutionary; it’s just an all-fiber network running on good servers.