The Brett Favre conundrum

I don’t know what to think about Brett Favre now trying to come out of retirement and how if he does, it probably won’t be for the Packers. I just can’t imagine his playing for, say, Minnesota!

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    We don’t need no steenking Packers in Minnesota.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    We don’t need no steenking Packers in Minnesota.

  • saddler

    Favre: “How can they (Packer’s management) be concerned about my legacy when they seem to want me to finish things out in Green Bay with a clip board in hand.” (Paraphrase)

    This seems to me to be a great way to preserve a great legacy. The old guard steps down to make way for the young QB to step up. Rodgers could thrive under the direct tutelage of Favre. What better way to give your legacy longevity than to pass your knowledge and experience to those who follow.
    Also, Favre could well see significant playing time even if Rodgers doesn’t get hurt. Reduced playing time for a nearly forty year old quarterback would seem to make sense. Does he really believe that he can maintain the same high level of playing this next season as he did last season? Chances are pretty slim I’m thinking. But if he could reduce playing time to 20% of full time, he could remain effective for a bit longer.

    Favre is obviously thnking that his legacy is a single dimensional thing: playing full time at a very high level. If he doesn’t relenquish this idea willingly, it will get ripped out of his hands in a bad way that will only tarnish his legacy.

  • saddler

    Favre: “How can they (Packer’s management) be concerned about my legacy when they seem to want me to finish things out in Green Bay with a clip board in hand.” (Paraphrase)

    This seems to me to be a great way to preserve a great legacy. The old guard steps down to make way for the young QB to step up. Rodgers could thrive under the direct tutelage of Favre. What better way to give your legacy longevity than to pass your knowledge and experience to those who follow.
    Also, Favre could well see significant playing time even if Rodgers doesn’t get hurt. Reduced playing time for a nearly forty year old quarterback would seem to make sense. Does he really believe that he can maintain the same high level of playing this next season as he did last season? Chances are pretty slim I’m thinking. But if he could reduce playing time to 20% of full time, he could remain effective for a bit longer.

    Favre is obviously thnking that his legacy is a single dimensional thing: playing full time at a very high level. If he doesn’t relenquish this idea willingly, it will get ripped out of his hands in a bad way that will only tarnish his legacy.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    My take is simple; he’s 38, and he’s miraculously survived all those years in the NFL with his knees and his family intact, and he should have made and invested enough money to live comfortably for life. I’m hoping that he hangs up his cleats and turns his attention to other things. Possibly coaching, possibly other businesses. Saddler’s got a great point that his legacy can only be soiled by playing when his body ain’t the same as it was.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    My take is simple; he’s 38, and he’s miraculously survived all those years in the NFL with his knees and his family intact, and he should have made and invested enough money to live comfortably for life. I’m hoping that he hangs up his cleats and turns his attention to other things. Possibly coaching, possibly other businesses. Saddler’s got a great point that his legacy can only be soiled by playing when his body ain’t the same as it was.

  • Chryst

    My prediction is that he will play and start for the Packers this year.

    Trading him will be difficult, as he also has a veto-power in his contract, so they can’t send him where he doesn’t want to go.

    Releasing him gets the Packers nothing.

    Sitting him isn’t realistic – $12 million a year for a backup who, realistically, still gives them a better chance to win than Rodgers. No, they will have to swallow their pride and let him start. Methinks.

  • Chryst

    My prediction is that he will play and start for the Packers this year.

    Trading him will be difficult, as he also has a veto-power in his contract, so they can’t send him where he doesn’t want to go.

    Releasing him gets the Packers nothing.

    Sitting him isn’t realistic – $12 million a year for a backup who, realistically, still gives them a better chance to win than Rodgers. No, they will have to swallow their pride and let him start. Methinks.

  • Greg Smith

    I think that Packer fans in general are a bit disturbed about this development. Everyone is moving on in their mind to the post-Favre era. If Brett wants to continue playing, the best option for the Packers is a trade. After last year, Brett should still be worth quite a bit.

    Lars: I don’t think you have to worry about him winding up with the Vikes. He never played consistently well at the Dome, or any indoor arena for that matter. Ditto for Detroit. But he could wind up in Chicago where he has always played well.

  • Greg Smith

    I think that Packer fans in general are a bit disturbed about this development. Everyone is moving on in their mind to the post-Favre era. If Brett wants to continue playing, the best option for the Packers is a trade. After last year, Brett should still be worth quite a bit.

    Lars: I don’t think you have to worry about him winding up with the Vikes. He never played consistently well at the Dome, or any indoor arena for that matter. Ditto for Detroit. But he could wind up in Chicago where he has always played well.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert

    The rumor here in Indianapolis is that, with Peyton Manning undergoing knee surgery and being out for 6 weeks, there might be some consideration of going after Favre for Peyton’s backup. PM has a backup now, guy by the name of Jim Sorgi (played college at Wisconsin), but he’s untested and looks shaky whenever he plays.

    We could certainly use a seasoned vet at the backup QB spot, but I don’t see Favre filling that. I don’t think Favre would un-retire just to hold a clipboard for somebody.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert

    The rumor here in Indianapolis is that, with Peyton Manning undergoing knee surgery and being out for 6 weeks, there might be some consideration of going after Favre for Peyton’s backup. PM has a backup now, guy by the name of Jim Sorgi (played college at Wisconsin), but he’s untested and looks shaky whenever he plays.

    We could certainly use a seasoned vet at the backup QB spot, but I don’t see Favre filling that. I don’t think Favre would un-retire just to hold a clipboard for somebody.

  • Andrew

    Not only did he already tarnish an amazing legacy he is hurting the Packers dearly in the process. I am part of campaign to try and keep him retired (the only outcome that doesn’t hurt both parties involved). We are trying to get 5,000 people to send 2 golf balls each to Favre giving him enough balls to last him the rest of his life. Check it out here if you want to do something and let Brett know how we feel: https://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/stay-retired-brett-favre

    However, I know there are many out there who feel the other way on the issue. I made my campaign in response to another one on the site that will send 10,000 pices of Craft Singles to Ted Thompson if he doesn’t bring Favre back. If you’d rather look at that one check it out here: https://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/bring-back-brett-favre

  • Andrew

    Not only did he already tarnish an amazing legacy he is hurting the Packers dearly in the process. I am part of campaign to try and keep him retired (the only outcome that doesn’t hurt both parties involved). We are trying to get 5,000 people to send 2 golf balls each to Favre giving him enough balls to last him the rest of his life. Check it out here if you want to do something and let Brett know how we feel: https://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/stay-retired-brett-favre

    However, I know there are many out there who feel the other way on the issue. I made my campaign in response to another one on the site that will send 10,000 pices of Craft Singles to Ted Thompson if he doesn’t bring Favre back. If you’d rather look at that one check it out here: https://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/bring-back-brett-favre

  • T.V.

    First, stop toying with Viking fans and our fragile emotions, Sports Illustrated has already got us worried about the season.
    Second, no way this side of heaven the cheese heads let BF sign with an NFC Central team.
    Third, Brett, do what’s best for all concerned…STAY RETIRED!!!

  • T.V.

    First, stop toying with Viking fans and our fragile emotions, Sports Illustrated has already got us worried about the season.
    Second, no way this side of heaven the cheese heads let BF sign with an NFC Central team.
    Third, Brett, do what’s best for all concerned…STAY RETIRED!!!

  • http://teristyrades.blogspot.com Teri B.

    [b]Favre Part II – The Media Created Epic
    Get Your Popcorn and Check Your Brain at the Door[/b]

    I rewound and watched Brett’s interview last night TWICE, because I had seen an early release of some of the comments from it that didn’t jive with what Brett said.

    Then, later in the evening, I heard ESPN reporting that Brett might “show up at training camp and cause a circus.” HE NEVER SAID THAT. In fact, he never even mentioned training camp. That was the media filling blanks they created.

    “It’s tempting just to, as everyone said, you know, call their bluff or whatever,” Favre said. “I think it’s going to be a circus in itself already, whether I go there, whatever.” Favre’s tone of voice while making that comment clearly indicated he thought doing that was absurd. “I don’t want to go back there just to stick it to them, ” Favre added.

    Perhaps he was referring to training camp – perhaps he was talking about playing at Green Bay in general, but ESPN’s reporting spun it as if he were vindictively wanting to get back at the Packers by disrupting training camp. Quite the contrary, he was just saying that others were suggesting he could call the Packers’ bluff, and that while it was tempting, he had no desire to “stick it to them.”

    Further, ESPN was reporting that Brett was even now waffling on whether he wants to come back and play. That’s not true! He was stating that he was ready and able, but that “where is a different story.”

    This entire thing makes me ashamed of the sports world in total. To treat a guy who played with so much heart, honestly, and dignity like this really disgusts me. It was the media who ginned up this retirement story every year, NOT Favre. Yet I heard it characterized on ESPN last night as Favre’s “never-ending reversals.” He reversed himself ONCE. Other than that, HE’S BEEN HOUNDED ABOUT IT and merely responded that he hadn’t made any decisions. Good grief, during those years, as if his age and the team’s success weren’t weighing heavily enough on his mind, his wife was battling cancer and his father died. He would be irrational not to carefully consider putting the kind of total, grueling physical and emotional effort into another year that such a decision warranted.

    The media loves salacious BS, and if it doesn’t exist, they certainly know how to create it, but sports is generally pretty straight forward. Next, they’ll be changing the scores of sporting contests just to fit into the story lines they create.

    Watch it for yourself, then compare it what the idiot talking heads are saying and reporting:

    The media did the same thing in the Democratic primary. They rammed as much drama and controversy as they could into it for the sake of greed, money, and ratings, and at the expense of democracy. You should see the ratings CNN and MSNBC got during the primary. It was a freakin’ bonanza.

    Further, Fox News edited the Favre interview: 1) so they could split it up into 2 nights and up their ratings, and so they could play up anything that was even remotely controversial. According to http://gretawire.foxnews.com/, earlier in the morning, the entire 40 min. interview with Favre would be available on that website shortly, now they’re saying it won’t be posted there, but more excerpts will be aired on Fox Tonight:

    [quote]We have showed you two parts of our interview with Green Bay Packer Brett Favre…but we spent much more time with him. (We taped about 40 minutes.) We will post here – on GretaWire – the rest of the interview that you have not seen ON THE RECORD. I expect we will post the rest tomorrow…

    UPDATE – (Wed)…the entire interview won’t get posted here until tomorrow…but we are looking at airing more of this interview tonight that you have not seen …[/quote]

    http://gretawire.foxnews.com/2008/07/15/gretawire-note-bret-favre/

    Like Fox News can’t spare a few moments from exploiting that poor woman’s death whose body was just found, [i]ad nauseum [/i]to show the entire interview unedited.

    Now people are tuning in and clicking away on Fox News, sports networks, and other websites to find out what’s going on with Favre and the Packers, so they’re milking it for all it’s worth and outright LYING in order to make it sound as dramatic and contentious as possible. Too bad if they’ve got to turn Favre into a villian in the process. For a lot of jealous, loser can’t do “commentators” and writers that’s just an added bonus. If they want to create news, they should get off their flabby asses and play a sport, not throw feces at the ones who do.

    I swear, this is really sickening. I’ve already gotten to where I get my news mostly from NPR, PBS, and digging on the web on my own, so only watching the actual sporting events and shunning ESPN and the others won’t even be noticeable in my world.

    If we keep tuning in to this tabloid crap, and the media keeps profiting from this behavior, we can kiss real objective “reporting” good bye. I for one, will not.

    http://teristyrades.blogspot.com/2008/07/favre-part-ii-media-created-epic-get.html

  • http://teristyrades.blogspot.com Teri B.

    [b]Favre Part II – The Media Created Epic
    Get Your Popcorn and Check Your Brain at the Door[/b]

    I rewound and watched Brett’s interview last night TWICE, because I had seen an early release of some of the comments from it that didn’t jive with what Brett said.

    Then, later in the evening, I heard ESPN reporting that Brett might “show up at training camp and cause a circus.” HE NEVER SAID THAT. In fact, he never even mentioned training camp. That was the media filling blanks they created.

    “It’s tempting just to, as everyone said, you know, call their bluff or whatever,” Favre said. “I think it’s going to be a circus in itself already, whether I go there, whatever.” Favre’s tone of voice while making that comment clearly indicated he thought doing that was absurd. “I don’t want to go back there just to stick it to them, ” Favre added.

    Perhaps he was referring to training camp – perhaps he was talking about playing at Green Bay in general, but ESPN’s reporting spun it as if he were vindictively wanting to get back at the Packers by disrupting training camp. Quite the contrary, he was just saying that others were suggesting he could call the Packers’ bluff, and that while it was tempting, he had no desire to “stick it to them.”

    Further, ESPN was reporting that Brett was even now waffling on whether he wants to come back and play. That’s not true! He was stating that he was ready and able, but that “where is a different story.”

    This entire thing makes me ashamed of the sports world in total. To treat a guy who played with so much heart, honestly, and dignity like this really disgusts me. It was the media who ginned up this retirement story every year, NOT Favre. Yet I heard it characterized on ESPN last night as Favre’s “never-ending reversals.” He reversed himself ONCE. Other than that, HE’S BEEN HOUNDED ABOUT IT and merely responded that he hadn’t made any decisions. Good grief, during those years, as if his age and the team’s success weren’t weighing heavily enough on his mind, his wife was battling cancer and his father died. He would be irrational not to carefully consider putting the kind of total, grueling physical and emotional effort into another year that such a decision warranted.

    The media loves salacious BS, and if it doesn’t exist, they certainly know how to create it, but sports is generally pretty straight forward. Next, they’ll be changing the scores of sporting contests just to fit into the story lines they create.

    Watch it for yourself, then compare it what the idiot talking heads are saying and reporting:

    The media did the same thing in the Democratic primary. They rammed as much drama and controversy as they could into it for the sake of greed, money, and ratings, and at the expense of democracy. You should see the ratings CNN and MSNBC got during the primary. It was a freakin’ bonanza.

    Further, Fox News edited the Favre interview: 1) so they could split it up into 2 nights and up their ratings, and so they could play up anything that was even remotely controversial. According to http://gretawire.foxnews.com/, earlier in the morning, the entire 40 min. interview with Favre would be available on that website shortly, now they’re saying it won’t be posted there, but more excerpts will be aired on Fox Tonight:

    [quote]We have showed you two parts of our interview with Green Bay Packer Brett Favre…but we spent much more time with him. (We taped about 40 minutes.) We will post here – on GretaWire – the rest of the interview that you have not seen ON THE RECORD. I expect we will post the rest tomorrow…

    UPDATE – (Wed)…the entire interview won’t get posted here until tomorrow…but we are looking at airing more of this interview tonight that you have not seen …[/quote]

    http://gretawire.foxnews.com/2008/07/15/gretawire-note-bret-favre/

    Like Fox News can’t spare a few moments from exploiting that poor woman’s death whose body was just found, [i]ad nauseum [/i]to show the entire interview unedited.

    Now people are tuning in and clicking away on Fox News, sports networks, and other websites to find out what’s going on with Favre and the Packers, so they’re milking it for all it’s worth and outright LYING in order to make it sound as dramatic and contentious as possible. Too bad if they’ve got to turn Favre into a villian in the process. For a lot of jealous, loser can’t do “commentators” and writers that’s just an added bonus. If they want to create news, they should get off their flabby asses and play a sport, not throw feces at the ones who do.

    I swear, this is really sickening. I’ve already gotten to where I get my news mostly from NPR, PBS, and digging on the web on my own, so only watching the actual sporting events and shunning ESPN and the others won’t even be noticeable in my world.

    If we keep tuning in to this tabloid crap, and the media keeps profiting from this behavior, we can kiss real objective “reporting” good bye. I for one, will not.

    http://teristyrades.blogspot.com/2008/07/favre-part-ii-media-created-epic-get.html

  • http://www.besidethequeue.wordpress.com David

    Growing up (I’m 21 now) for me was one vast, extended exercise in hero veneration. No single human being was as amazing to me as Brett Favre. I say this jokingly, but I may as well have had an icon or two of him on my wall.

    What made him so great was the way he played like a kid, the way he was humble, and the way he cared so deeply for his team and the game. Today, I feel very differently. Apparently, he deals with difficult situations and disappointments like a child too.

    And that he would even question Packers General Manager Ted Thompson’s decision in recent years in laughable. TT has turned a disapointing and undisciplined team into a young contending team, with tons of potential.

    Favre brought up the Wahle and Rivera signings, or lack thereof: Brett, TT was a genius on this one. Wahle has been sub-par in two years with Carolina, and Rivera is no longer in the league.

    He brought up how TT didn’t hire Mariucci. Well, Brett Mike McCarthy is clearly the man for this job.

    And he brought up Randy Moss: Brett, you already have some of the best WR’s in the game in Jennings and Driver.

    It’s been quite a disapointment to see my boyhood hero lash out on my beloved team with such immaturity. Enlightening too, I suppose. Oh, that all our heros were perfect!

    I apologize for my rant.

  • http://www.besidethequeue.wordpress.com David

    Growing up (I’m 21 now) for me was one vast, extended exercise in hero veneration. No single human being was as amazing to me as Brett Favre. I say this jokingly, but I may as well have had an icon or two of him on my wall.

    What made him so great was the way he played like a kid, the way he was humble, and the way he cared so deeply for his team and the game. Today, I feel very differently. Apparently, he deals with difficult situations and disappointments like a child too.

    And that he would even question Packers General Manager Ted Thompson’s decision in recent years in laughable. TT has turned a disapointing and undisciplined team into a young contending team, with tons of potential.

    Favre brought up the Wahle and Rivera signings, or lack thereof: Brett, TT was a genius on this one. Wahle has been sub-par in two years with Carolina, and Rivera is no longer in the league.

    He brought up how TT didn’t hire Mariucci. Well, Brett Mike McCarthy is clearly the man for this job.

    And he brought up Randy Moss: Brett, you already have some of the best WR’s in the game in Jennings and Driver.

    It’s been quite a disapointment to see my boyhood hero lash out on my beloved team with such immaturity. Enlightening too, I suppose. Oh, that all our heros were perfect!

    I apologize for my rant.

  • Bruce

    Patrick O’Brien fans ought to be able to understand the character and behavior of Brett Favre. His fictional parallel is found in the famous character Jack Aubrey, a golden-haired ship’s captain beloved by his crew and known around the fleet as Lucky Jack Aubrey for his reckless daring, and success in taking prizes–captured ships sold for their cargo.

    Jack Aubrey on land however, was another thing altogether. Subject to the bad advice of any wiley land lawyer and speculator, negligent in hearing the warning voice of his wife Deanna–I mean Sophie! He squandered his reputation and wealth in foolish investment schemes, and the only possible recourse was a return to the sea. More than once a running off at the mouth at a soiree was the cause of his hasty retreat to his ship, his ship weighing anchor, and his hurried departure from the port.

    You “sea” where I’m going with this?

  • Bruce

    Patrick O’Brien fans ought to be able to understand the character and behavior of Brett Favre. His fictional parallel is found in the famous character Jack Aubrey, a golden-haired ship’s captain beloved by his crew and known around the fleet as Lucky Jack Aubrey for his reckless daring, and success in taking prizes–captured ships sold for their cargo.

    Jack Aubrey on land however, was another thing altogether. Subject to the bad advice of any wiley land lawyer and speculator, negligent in hearing the warning voice of his wife Deanna–I mean Sophie! He squandered his reputation and wealth in foolish investment schemes, and the only possible recourse was a return to the sea. More than once a running off at the mouth at a soiree was the cause of his hasty retreat to his ship, his ship weighing anchor, and his hurried departure from the port.

    You “sea” where I’m going with this?

  • Russell

    I’m an Australian and some 15 years ago we got our first televised NFL game on our equivalent of a public broadcaster hosted by one Don Lane. These were late night full game coverages and they were interspersed with information about the rules, the positions and the game tactics.

    That first game was a Packers game and watching a much younger Favre back then was a great introduction to the game and made a Packers fan of me.

    I have religiously watched the 2 or 3 games a week we get via Fox and ESPN and especially the Packers games. Like any other fan, I watched the retirement speech but was left with a sense of disquiet as to whether he had really made the decision in his heart.

    I’ve read the current events, watched the interview, listened to the (extensive) commentary from the experts and at the end of all this I cannot see there being any real winners from the sad and sorry saga.

    Nor is anyone really in the right here. Packers management have clearly been less than forthcoming, Favre has been indecisive and the media has played the whole thing out like a daytime soap opera.

    From my view, I was glad he retired after last season rather than the one before but if he wants to play again then the Packers should be his first option. Whether that relationship has suffered too much damage from the comments made to date is hard to assess but it is a good solution for both parties and probably won’t do Rodgers any harm either particularly if they both get playing time.

    Having said that, I will continue to watch and support his decision even in another uniform – he is, after all, a unique player and although he may not be at his best any more he brings passion to the game. Something that is sadly missing from likes of Peyton Manning – the ronot of QB’s.

  • Russell

    I’m an Australian and some 15 years ago we got our first televised NFL game on our equivalent of a public broadcaster hosted by one Don Lane. These were late night full game coverages and they were interspersed with information about the rules, the positions and the game tactics.

    That first game was a Packers game and watching a much younger Favre back then was a great introduction to the game and made a Packers fan of me.

    I have religiously watched the 2 or 3 games a week we get via Fox and ESPN and especially the Packers games. Like any other fan, I watched the retirement speech but was left with a sense of disquiet as to whether he had really made the decision in his heart.

    I’ve read the current events, watched the interview, listened to the (extensive) commentary from the experts and at the end of all this I cannot see there being any real winners from the sad and sorry saga.

    Nor is anyone really in the right here. Packers management have clearly been less than forthcoming, Favre has been indecisive and the media has played the whole thing out like a daytime soap opera.

    From my view, I was glad he retired after last season rather than the one before but if he wants to play again then the Packers should be his first option. Whether that relationship has suffered too much damage from the comments made to date is hard to assess but it is a good solution for both parties and probably won’t do Rodgers any harm either particularly if they both get playing time.

    Having said that, I will continue to watch and support his decision even in another uniform – he is, after all, a unique player and although he may not be at his best any more he brings passion to the game. Something that is sadly missing from likes of Peyton Manning – the ronot of QB’s.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17639370291865261582 Cindy Ramos

    I don’t know what Favre is up to. I always thought he was pretty honest, and after watching his press conference last March I was convinced that he was finished with football. Obviously he’s struggling through a huge adjustment. I just hope he figures things out quickly before he makes himself look worse.

    He admits he makes decisions emotionally, but I hope he can see the situation objectively and realize that he ought to stay retired. If he really wants to play again, he will have to swallow his pride and accept that he gave up his spot as automatic starter. Whether he comes back in Green Bay or elsewhere, it will be different than it was before.

    If he backs down and apologizes for causing a commotion in Green Bay, Packer fans will soon forgive him. He has enough of a reservoir of good will that he could still get out of this situation with his legacy intact. Packer fans want him to have a future like Bart Starr – an old hero who is a permanent friend of the team. We want him to be on good terms with the Packers; we want to be able to welcome him back to Lambeau anytime – in a ceremonial role.

    If he keeps on stirring up trouble, it would be a real shame for everyone. David (#9), I feel for you. My four-year-old son has a good start on Favre hero veneration. I hope I never have to explain to him that Brett Favre doesn’t like the Packers anymore.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17639370291865261582 Cindy Ramos

    I don’t know what Favre is up to. I always thought he was pretty honest, and after watching his press conference last March I was convinced that he was finished with football. Obviously he’s struggling through a huge adjustment. I just hope he figures things out quickly before he makes himself look worse.

    He admits he makes decisions emotionally, but I hope he can see the situation objectively and realize that he ought to stay retired. If he really wants to play again, he will have to swallow his pride and accept that he gave up his spot as automatic starter. Whether he comes back in Green Bay or elsewhere, it will be different than it was before.

    If he backs down and apologizes for causing a commotion in Green Bay, Packer fans will soon forgive him. He has enough of a reservoir of good will that he could still get out of this situation with his legacy intact. Packer fans want him to have a future like Bart Starr – an old hero who is a permanent friend of the team. We want him to be on good terms with the Packers; we want to be able to welcome him back to Lambeau anytime – in a ceremonial role.

    If he keeps on stirring up trouble, it would be a real shame for everyone. David (#9), I feel for you. My four-year-old son has a good start on Favre hero veneration. I hope I never have to explain to him that Brett Favre doesn’t like the Packers anymore.


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